How many songs does it take for you to say you like an artist/band?

doggyd69b

Gold Member
As the title says, it takes more than just one song for me, but I say if I listen to an artist or band that has 2 or 3 albums and I like at least 10 or 12 out of 30 songs then I can say I like that band.
One example of that for me is Deftones, I have listened to their albums and out of each I like mostly 3 or 4 songs so out of all albums combined maybe around 16 or 17 songs, which makes a decent playlist.

I guess I should also ask how many listens does it take you to "get" an album?

For that example it took me several listens to get the greatness of Queensryche's Operation Mindcrime.
Same can be said for a few of King Diamond's records. (Even if you hate the vocals, the music is just superb).

Finally I have put some artists/bands off for years not sure why as in life got in the way kind of thing or I just kept listening to my "go to" bands. Of course I have heard of those bands before and even liked a few songs, but never took the time to listen to even one complete album, one recent example is Five Finger Death Punch, which just happens to have quite a lot of music that I enjoy so currently studying their drummer which may not be the fastest double bass wise but he sure has,.....had the stamina to play fast for a very long time.
In the song below where I can reach the speed no problem but I am unable to maintain that for more than 2 min. I am sure I could with some practice but again life gets in the way and at present I don't even have days off let alone time (or energy left) to drum.

 
I’m picky and precise. If someone asks “do you like such-and-such band?” I’ll say “I like a few of their songs.” For me to say I like them more generally, they have to have some history, maybe multiple albums where I like at least some of the material on most of the albums. I guess if it’s some spirited youngsters just hitting the scene, I might say I like them in the sense that I admire their creativity and hope they can keep it going.
 
I’m picky and precise. If someone asks “do you like such-and-such band?” I’ll say “I like a few of their songs.” For me to say I like them more generally, they have to have some history, maybe multiple albums where I like at least some of the material on most of the albums. I guess if it’s some spirited youngsters just hitting the scene, I might say I like them in the sense that I admire their creativity and hope they can keep it going.
At present time there is not a single band (in all my music history going from 1975 to now) that I can say I like all of their songs. Even the most "perfect" albums like the aforementioned Operation Mindcrime are not immune to that. However I sill like it.
Another thing I do (not on purpose most of the time) is I would not listen to a band or album for years and then "re-discover" my love for their music (and with a new appreciation because maybe the nostalgia factor) when I once again listen and enjoy the music with my current mindset.
How does that work for you?
 
One of Son of Vistalite Black's high school friends raged for an entire afternoon in 1981 because he bought the Red Rider LP with the radio hit "Lunatic Fringe," and there was nothing else that sounded like that hit or, in his opinion, justified the $8.98 cost of the album. For reference, a six-pack of beer cost $3.66 at the time.

SoVB can enjoy a few songs from a band and remain a fan until the act goes in a direction that is not as enjoyable. What happens in rare occasions is the band makes a record that destroys one's fandom completely. SoVB bought R.E.M.'s first EP and the first CD ever purchased was "Murmur," but "Shiny Happy People" made it impossible to continue to listen to any of their work -- before or after. Jackson Browne's "Lawyers in Love" had a similar effect.

For a more contemporary reference, "On the Game" by The Black Keys and "Mustang" by Kings of Leon is currently ruining SoVB's appreciation of those bands. It's a try-too-hard thing.
 
For me anyway , …..
I’d say ……
Under like a dozen and I like the song , over a dozen and I like the band and or artist . But it depends on how many albums/songs they have . An artist or band could be short lived and have a dozen sings( one album ) and if I like 10 I’d guess I’d be a fan of the band/artist . By the same token a band/artist could have over a dozen albums and I could like say 16 songs but dislike the rest I guess I’d be a fan of those songs only . Interesting question .
Maybe I need to think on this some more 😂.
 
I have never been into liking a particular artist or band way over others.
There are many great songs made by a lot of different musicians - also one-day-flies.
Some people made multiple great songs but usually as many I don't like.
 
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Back in the days of vinyl, if a record made you get up and flip it to the other side for the 12th time, the band/artist is worth listening to.

In the 1980s, I had to buy a second vinyl of Back in Black and Regatta de Blanc. But Quiet Riot's Metal Health never passed the bar.

Nowadays I listen to Apple Music. If I hear a worthy tune, I play that artist's "channel" and check 'em out. I've drilled through George Strait's catalog (loved it) and am now fully enjoying Vince Gill's guitar playing.
 
One of Son of Vistalite Black's high school friends raged for an entire afternoon in 1981 because he bought the Red Rider LP with the radio hit "Lunatic Fringe," and there was nothing else that sounded like that hit or, in his opinion, justified the $8.98 cost of the album. For reference, a six-pack of beer cost $3.66 at the time.

SoVB can enjoy a few songs from a band and remain a fan until the act goes in a direction that is not as enjoyable. What happens in rare occasions is the band makes a record that destroys one's fandom completely. SoVB bought R.E.M.'s first EP and the first CD ever purchased was "Murmur," but "Shiny Happy People" made it impossible to continue to listen to any of their work -- before or after. Jackson Browne's "Lawyers in Love" had a similar effect.

For a more contemporary reference, "On the Game" by The Black Keys and "Mustang" by Kings of Leon is currently ruining SoVB's appreciation of those bands. It's a try-too-hard thing.
Bands need to evolve and that is a lot of times what kills them (or kills them for a lot of previous fans) one example (because I like to give examples of everything when available) is Metallica.

They went from aggressive trash metal on their first three albums to a more.. "metal progressive" And Justice for all which was still metal albeit different, to the more commercially oriented Load and Re-load which alienated a lot of people.
I don't think anything they have produced up to present day matched the level of their first 3 albums but that is of course my opinion. That and getting old, you can't expect anyone to perform at the same level they did when they were in their 20's when they are now mid sixties...
I can't blame anybody for wanting to evolve though.
 
One of Son of Vistalite Black's high school friends raged for an entire afternoon in 1981 because he bought the Red Rider LP with the radio hit "Lunatic Fringe," and there was nothing else that sounded like that hit or, in his opinion, justified the $8.98 cost of the album. For reference, a six-pack of beer cost $3.66 at the time.

SoVB can enjoy a few songs from a band and remain a fan until the act goes in a direction that is not as enjoyable. What happens in rare occasions is the band makes a record that destroys one's fandom completely. SoVB bought R.E.M.'s first EP and the first CD ever purchased was "Murmur," but "Shiny Happy People" made it impossible to continue to listen to any of their work -- before or after. Jackson Browne's "Lawyers in Love" had a similar effect.

For a more contemporary reference, "On the Game" by The Black Keys and "Mustang" by Kings of Leon is currently ruining SoVB's appreciation of those bands. It's a try-too-hard thing.
Bands need to evolve and that is a lot of times what kills them (or kills them for a lot of previous fans) one example (because I like to give examples of everything when available) is Metallica.

They went from aggressive trash metal on their first three albums to a more.. "metal progressive" And Justice for all which was still metal albeit different, to the more commercially oriented Load and Re-load which alienated a lot of people.
I don't think anything they have produced up to present day matched the level of their first 3 albums but that is of course my opinion. That and getting old, you can't expect anyone to perform at the same level they did when they were in their 20's when they are now mid sixties...
I can't blame anybody for wanting to evolve.

I like to believe that when an artist or band choose to record and album (and this may be part of the producer's job) they have a specific direction and they are not just recording random tracks that are all over the place so maybe your friend jumped the gun buying that album and/or didn't give the rest of the tracks a fair chance. To me it took me an average of 4 listen throughs (full album) to start to like most of it (or determine I don't like [most of it] enough therefore is not worth my time [or money] to buy). This of course is no longer the case with all the music available online, you could just stream the album and never really spend the $$, I just like to try to support the artist but we all know that these days the streaming services get all the $$ and the artist gets peanuts.
 
For some years one of my favorite bands, based on their early albums, was Calexico. Then later in their career they turned to more radio friendly Americana indie rock, and that material was boring and sucked. I don’t know if it’s just where they were at as artists, or if they were making a bid for commercial success. So then I “didn’t like them anymore”. Some more years passed and I thought why not see what they’re up to lately, and it turned out they had done some great new creative work while I wasn’t looking. So yeah I like them, and they just put out some clunkers along the way, which is unavoidable for any prolific artist.
 
One little fragment, like a few bars, even just one bar if they are improvising or they are either very good or very bad...
 
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One of Son of Vistalite Black's high school friends raged for an entire afternoon in 1981 because he bought the Red Rider LP with the radio hit "Lunatic Fringe," and there was nothing else that sounded like that hit or, in his opinion, justified the $8.98 cost of the album. For reference, a six-pack of beer cost $3.66 at the time.

SoVB can enjoy a few songs from a band and remain a fan until the act goes in a direction that is not as enjoyable. What happens in rare occasions is the band makes a record that destroys one's fandom completely. SoVB bought R.E.M.'s first EP and the first CD ever purchased was "Murmur," but "Shiny Happy People" made it impossible to continue to listen to any of their work -- before or after. Jackson Browne's "Lawyers in Love" had a similar effect.

For a more contemporary reference, "On the Game" by The Black Keys and "Mustang" by Kings of Leon is currently ruining SoVB's appreciation of those bands. It's a try-too-hard thing.
I was with you until the Jackson Browne part... ;)
 
I have to like at least half of an artist's songs to say I like the band. Peace and goodwill.
 
I don't get math-y about it- no certain total number an artist has to reach. I do have an approximate percentage of their total work, i.e. if I only like 2-4 songs per album, I'd say they're ok but I don't own any of their material, but if I like all but 1 or 2 songs on each album, I'd say I'm into them. That decreases if they start making the same album over & over; I'd rather see an artist evolve in a way that I don't like as much (Metallica) than repeat themselves into mind-numbing redundancy (Deftones, AC/DC).

I also don't have a longevity requirement- I immediately loved S.C.I.E.N.C.E. (their debut label release) by Incubus- it was my favorite album of 1997 and it didn't leave my CD changer for months. They then evolved into more focused songwriters and less funkity-funk but they were still great. The year prior, my all-time favorite band Fishbone, who I thought could do no wrong, released a clunker (but not due to the change in sound/mood) compared to previous efforts. I've grown to appreciate it more over the years but it still doesn't come close to all their previous work.
 
Oh, Fishbone… one of the greatest bands ever, except for their records. I don’t remember the details but it seemed like they got screwed over by the industry and it drove them “out of business” as a band.
 
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