How many drum parts or techniques are there?

beeter

Senior Member
Do they have names? With guitars there's techniques like palm muting and so on. Just curious what they are for drumming. Seems as if banging on drums is easy enough.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Oh geez, you have just opened Pandora's box. This list will be endless. I'll give you an easy one:

Cymbal choke - it's when you catch the cymbal immediately after striking it.
 

MrPockets

Gold Member
Don't say endless. Just give me the actual number, you only gave one.
Given the nature of the instrument it is essentially endless.

Buzzes
Diddles
Rolls
Rim Shots
Cross Stick
Flams
double stops
Heel Up
Heel Down
Hi Hat Splash
Open Hi Hat
Closed Hi Hat
Bell
...

Then there are stick techniques like:

American
French
German
Moeller
Push/Pull
...
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Given the nature of the instrument it is essentially endless.

Buzzes
Diddles
Rolls
Rim Shots
Cross Stick
Flams
double stops
Heel Up
Heel Down
Hi Hat Splash
Open Hi Hat
Closed Hi Hat
Bell
...

Then there are stick techniques like:

American
French
German
Moeller
Push/Pull
...
Let's no forget about beats:
Shuffle
Train
Money
Four on the floor
Blast (many different variations of this)
...

Then there are rhythms/styles:
Samba
Waltz
Bossanova
Rock
...


You see where this is going. There is even a named technique that sets one stick on the rim and you hit it with the other stick. I was shown it a long time ago and don't remember what it is called. I never use it.
 

SmoothOperator

Gold Member
I read that the GuZheng, a Chinese Zither has the largest number of documented techniques required for proficiency.

I think the list of techniques for drums is potentially endless, but mastery doesn't really require that many, and many of the "masters" disappointingly never bother with more than a few.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
It's like asking how many different foods are there in the world. It's the possible combinations of foods, or drum techniques, that drives the number up.

You'll never get to them all, but what you will find will be enough.
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
No, no, no.
There is only one drumming technique. It's called the KM technique.
You simply hit something whenever you feel like it. You fill in all of the empty spaces in the music. As long as the hits are close to the tempo of the song.

See here: https://youtu.be/DOp3yLvQu1E



.
 
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beeter

Senior Member
I guess I should have asked what drum to hit along with what basically to get the "standard" effect in drumming. While there are no set rules per se, but how do I sound good (if one lacks virtuoso level chops)?

Does it go something like this; crash hits usually along with bass drum, and not toms etc.
 

beeter

Senior Member
Keith Moon played drums like it was a guitar!

I don't know if his "metronome" is determined by bass drum and snare, then everything else just HAD to be hit at all angles eventually lol.

No, no, no.
There is only one drumming technique. It's called the KM technique.
You simply hit something whenever you feel like it. You fill in all of the empty spaces in the music. As long as the hits are close to the tempo of the song.

See here: https://youtu.be/DOp3yLvQu1E



.
 

MrPockets

Gold Member
I guess I should have asked what drum to hit along with what basically to get the "standard" effect in drumming. While there are no set rules per se, but how do I sound good (if one lacks virtuoso level chops)?

Does it go something like this; crash hits usually along with bass drum, and not toms etc.
Stereotypical drum parts are genre dependant.
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
I guess I should have asked what drum to hit along with what basically to get the "standard" effect in drumming. While there are no set rules per se, but how do I sound good (if one lacks virtuoso level chops)?

Does it go something like this; crash hits usually along with bass drum, and not toms etc.
OK, at least now we're getting into 'how to play' questions. But still, you're asking us to count grains of sand for you here. People can (and have) written books on this. And made videos. And give lessons and make full four-year degree programs in conservatories. You're not going to get a diploma just from asking graduates questions, you've got to crack books and study on your own too.

Get on YouTube and voraciously search for "starting out on drums" videos. Don't get into master class type Drumeo gospel chops stuff right now. You want to learn good techniques for making consistent beats against a simple 4/4 time signature. And if you don't know what that is, start there. Even just read the Wikipedia entry on "drum kit". It's actually a pretty good and comprehensive article lately.

And again, consider getting lessons, if only for one or two sessions. You need some in-person time with a decent drummer who can show you these things in front of you, to get your hands on, and answer your questions in the context of an interpersonal conversation.
 
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