How long did it take you to find a band?

boomstick

Silver Member
I am currently in a new band, and I'm feeling pretty good about it so far. We are nearing the completion of our debut album, and I think it's going to be pretty good. Thing is, the search for the right band has been a long one for me, as in several years. It was hard enough finding people who were interested in making the kind of music I was interested in. On top of that, so many other factors have to come together: playing well together, getting along with each other, having similar goals and levels of commitment, being in close proximity to each other, among others. Also, given how much time and effort goes into getting a band going, I wanted to be sure it was something I was really enthusiastic about. I think that's the main reason why it too me so long. Anyway, I was wondering if others had an equally hard time finding the right band, or if it happened rather quickly.
 

TNA

Senior Member
It really depends on how picky you are with what kind of music you want to play. I could find a band tomorrow if I was more open to different genres. Also depends on what you can define as a band or being in a band. I've been in a band with some friends for years, yet we're only just now writing songs and actually being productive. The last "real" band I was in I found within a few weeks of looking. But we broke up after 6 months, but we did have a very good run during those 6 months.
 

Lucho

Member
Hey boomstick,

In the last 2 years I auditioned for loads of different bands trying to find a group where I felt comfortable with the people and I felt happy with the music that was being played.
I shuffled in and out of several groups and what I usually found was that I generally liked the people I was playing with, but I wasn't happy with the music that was being made. Or more specifically, the groups made good music but my opinions on songwriting weren't really heard.

After about a 6 months I finally found a group that I was really happy with and had a good run with them, then it took me another 4 months to find another group that I'm currently in. I'm quite happy with the groups and the creative input I can give and receive.

I think that finding the right group is really difficult, because personalities have to match and musical tastes have to match. And depending on where you live it's perfectly reasonable for it to take over a year to find a group you're happy with.
 

brady

Platinum Member
Still looking here too.

I was in a band this past spring/summer which I thought would be a good fit. It became evident pretty soon that we had vastly different influences.

My advice is to not answer a Craigslist ad...
 

boomstick

Silver Member
Well, I'm glad to know it's not just me that has a hard time! At one point, I wondered if I should join any band I could just to get out there. I often hear stories of musicians meeting at gigs and subsequently forming a band together. I finally did "compromise" and joined a cover band for a couple years. It wasn't really what I wanted to do, but I was out there playing. It never hooked me up with new people to play with though. Believe it or not, the band I am now was a craigslist connection. But craigs was just a means of establishing initial contact. All of us had lots of video/audio examples of our music/playing elsewhere online, so we all had a good idea of what we were into and what we were capable of before we even met in person.
 

boomstick

Silver Member
I shuffled in and out of several groups and what I usually found was that I generally liked the people I was playing with, but I wasn't happy with the music that was being made. Or more specifically, the groups made good music but my opinions on songwriting weren't really heard.
Oh yeah, that's a frustrating situation to be in. My current band is usually receptive to my ideas, but not always. I think the trick is to find people who are mostly on the same page as you, but also not take it personally if they occasionally shoot down your ideas.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
Find a good band is I think is one of the more difficult things to do.

Everyone has differences in influences, and differences in goals. Even you find a great band, keeping everyone together is rather difficult over time.
 

Florian

Gold Member
they found me.....I have yet to look for a band, all my previous bands in the last 30 years have come knocking....not sure why.

F
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
I've only ever auditioned twice - once for a great band that was out of my league for the experience and I wouldn't have been there except the keys player lived two doors down the road and had been a friend all my life.

So I've been in one band via audition, and it wasn't that great. All the others I've been involved in the start-up. Every band I've been in has been a "what if" band - "what if the singer was better?", "what if the others were interested in being more musically adventurous?", "what if the guitarist didn't have to re-tune every 10 seconds?", "what if the drummer wasn't such a flake?" :) There's always something that's not quite right.

I've always done a lot of settling. I've been settling for so long that I'm not sure my dream band even exists. I think of bands as being like an arranged marriage - you know they ain't The One but you get used to their peccadilloes and find your fun where you can.
 

Masheanhed

Senior Member
A band that has actually stayed together long enough to start booking gigs and work up over 40 songs? 27 years.

I have been in a slew of "one night stands" that lasted anywhere from one gig as a sit-in to a few small gigs before someone got mad, lazy, or was assassinated because of their ego.
 

MikeM

Platinum Member
Every band I've been in has been a "what if" band - "what if the singer was better?", "what if the others were interested in being more musically adventurous?", "what if the guitarist didn't have to re-tune every 10 seconds?", "what if the drummer wasn't such a flake?" :) There's always something that's not quite right.

I've always done a lot of settling. I've been settling for so long that I'm not sure my dream band even exists. I think of bands as being like an arranged marriage - you know they ain't The One but you get used to their peccadilloes and find your fun where you can.
Sadly, this is so true. To hold out for the perfect band where everyone is spectacular is to never play with anyone. Even the more successful bands that we all know about have serious cracks in their foundations that eventually bring the whole thing crashing down. Precious few bands can last for decades and often they aren't precious anyway.
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
Sadly, this is so true. To hold out for the perfect band where everyone is spectacular is to never play with anyone. Even the more successful bands that we all know about have serious cracks in their foundations that eventually bring the whole thing crashing down. Precious few bands can last for decades and often they aren't precious anyway.
Yep, the cracks in the foundations. It very often mirrors relationships where you have people who are at first stimulated by their differences (eg. one person's more into ballads and one's more into rock) which creates some interesting hybrids. Then one or both feels the need to stretch out more in their preferred idiom and strays too far from the compromise for the other person to tolerate.

This results in separations due to "artistic difference", or in layperson's terms - "It's not you, it's me" (aka "It's all YOU, you [expletive expletive]").
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
I believe to some extent, in order to find a good band you have to make your own luck. Market yourself and it becomes easier. If you've ever recorded something halfway decent that shows off your playing ability, you too can make a Facebook Music page, a Myspace Music page, or a ReverbNation page. That way, when you tell people "I play the drums", you can also give them a short, easy web address where they can actually hear you play.

I live in an area where apparently drummers are as scarce as pandas in the wild. I put up a well-written Craigslist ad with pictures and a link to my ReverbNation page. Within two months of moving to town, I had auditioned with one of the top local acts and our first gig was last Friday. Craigslist does work, if you use it correctly.

Other than that, you have to go where musicians go. Where are those places? Music stores, recording studios, and places that play live music (especially if there's places that cater to your specific brand of music). Network. Get to know people in the scene.... and for heaven's sake, don't burn bridges if you can help it. The guy you just told off might be the best-connected guitar player in the tri-state area!
 
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