How Do You Read These Notes?

ZenR1

Well-known member
In the second half of this bar, which is in common time, the last 4 snare hits are 16th notes right? Starting from the first snare/bass note combination, which starts on 3, how would you count this out?


Screenshot_20201204-074040_Chrome.jpg
 

ZenR1

Well-known member
1 + 2 + 3 +a .e+a. resting 4
So if the hihat note between the last two snare notes wasn't there, those two snare hits would be 8ths ( 4resting + a )? It's the hihat in between that makes the snare hits 16ths? Do I have this right?
 

WhoIsTony?

Member
So if the hihat note between the last two snare notes wasn't there, those two snare hits would be 8ths ( 4resting + a )? It's the hihat in between that makes the snare hits 16ths? Do I have this right?
no the snare would still be on the e and the a

removing one of the notes is not going to change the placement of the others
 

WhoIsTony?

Member
But the last two snare hits are farther apart than the previous two 16th snare hits?
you count 16th notes - 1E+A 2E+A 3E+A 4E+A

those two snare hits are on the E and the A of 4 and they always will be no matter what you take away

the two previous snare hits are on the + and the A of 3 ... those two beats are right next to each other that's why they are closer together
 

ZenR1

Well-known member
you count 16th notes - 1E+A 2E+A 3E+A 4E+A

those two snare hits are on the E and the A of 4 and they always will be no matter what you take away

the two previous snare hits are on the + and the A of 3 ... those two beats are right next to each other that's why they are closer together
When I listen to the actual song, the last two snare hits sound further apart than the previous two.
 

DrummerJustLikeDad

Well-known member
So if the hihat note between the last two snare notes wasn't there, those two snare hits would be 8ths ( 4resting + a )? It's the hihat in between that makes the snare hits 16ths? Do I have this right?
I see what you’re saying.

Yes, if you disregard the hi-hat strike and just observe the remaining snare hits and their timing to each other, then yes, the VALUE between those snare hits (identified “E“ & “AH”) is the exact same value and relationship which a “1” & “AND” would share together.

Therefore in your example, those last two snare strikes are as if you took a coupling of 2 eighth notes and slid them to the right by an increment of a 16th note. (If it helps to look at it that way, which I gather is where you were taking it.)
 

TMe

Senior Member
It misread it at first.

Here's what I get.

1 e & u 2 e & u 3 e & u 4 e & u
x - x - x - o - x - x x - - x -
1 - - - 2 - - - 3 - & u - e - u
 

ZenR1

Well-known member
I see what you’re saying.

Yes, if you disregard the hi-hat strike and just observe the remaining snare hits and their timing to each other, then yes, the VALUE between those snare hits (identified “E“ & “AH”) is the exact same value and relationship which a “1” & “AND” would share together.

Therefore in your example, those last two snare strikes are as if you took a coupling of 2 eighth notes and slid them to the right by an increment of a 16th note. (If it helps to look at it that way, which I gather is where you were taking it.)
yes...that is where I was taking it. Not sure if it's helpful
 
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rustyfingers

Senior Member
This has helped me more than once.

 

TOMANO

Senior Member
Having read it quickly on my phone, I screwed it up. I will take a drumstick in the eye.

1 & 2 & 3 (e) & a (4) e & a.

Feeling shame, I will play this for an hour.

Peace & Love.

MT
 

TMe

Senior Member
What throws me off is four eighth notes tied together to make a half note. Hate that. Who writes drumkit scores like that? We all think in terms of quarter notes, don't we?
 
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