How do you practice this style... ?uestlove

jodgey4

Silver Member
Maybe it means he does it by feel at times and by precise subdivision displacement at other times so he has no opinion one way or another?
Can't say I blame him, at the end of the day you're either playing music or not.
He probably sees us as arguing over basic math while he is a man who may have just as well invented calculus...
"Awww, that's so cute to see them struggle..." :p
 
A

Anthony Amodeo

Guest
Can't say I blame him, at the end of the day you're either playing music or not.
He probably sees us as arguing over basic math while he is a man who may have just as well invented calculus...
"Awww, that's so cute to see them struggle..." :p
I replied to his email asking if he could give me any thoughts on those beats and the unquantized affect .....got this reply

all sp1200, EPS16, ASR10, honestly never thought about it
Sent from my iPhone
 
I replied to his email asking if he could give me any thoughts on those beats and the unquantized affect .....got this reply

all sp1200, EPS16, ASR10, honestly never thought about it
Sent from my iPhone
Not surprised. I was working with the same gear as RZA during the time when he produced the first Wu-Tang record. Ironically it was the imperfections in that gear that drove people to the Roger Lynn MPC 3000 (the upgrade from the MPC 60).

The Ensoniq EPS (with the 3 button sequencer) and the EPS-16 plus (that was special because it had built in reverb effects), both had sequencer glitchs.


After awhile you just learned to accept it for what they where and move on to the next song.
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
I guess it's not too surprising he wouldn't have much to say about it-- creating something in the first place is different than trying to figure it out and copy it after the fact-- you have to operate on partial information, with a whole different technical background-- what's intuitive, organic and sort of inevitable for the original guy, can be, for someone trying to copy it— I don't know— sort of like trying to learn dairy farming by looking at a wheel of gouda.

By the way, I was doing some reading on this, and this passage from Chris Dave's MD interview was interesting— the three records he mentions when asked about arriving at his own sound are Crescent by John Coltrane, Sorcerer by Miles Davis, and Fantastic by Slum Village:

With Slum Village, J. Dilla was always doing these crazy beats. I worked real hard, trying to figure out how to play those J. Dilla beats on the drumkit. As drummers, we can hear most programmed beats and go to work learning them. But Dilla's stuff wasn't quantized. It was loopy and a little bit off. I was able to get that stuff down, and it opened my mind up even more.

MD: Play Dilla beats, you had to have strong independence. How did you develop that?

CD: I worked with the book 4-Way Coordination by Marvin Dahlgren. I had my four-way coordination down by the time I finished ninth grade. I'd started it well before I finished middle school. Being in control of that makes a huge difference in the way I play. All that brain-splitting stuff. It opened my thinking up, and I was able to see and hear all these ways to execute different rhythms and beats. So when I started getting into J. Dilla, it was hard, but I could do it because I had the independence I need to get those rhythms down and play them comfortably.
 
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