How do you drum along with music?

uniongoon

Gold Member
In defense of the guy who does not need to hear his drums, unless you have the music insanely loud, it is easier to play along with sound off pads, as long as you concentrate where your strokes are falling in relation to the play back, be aware of flamming, dragging, rushing etc. That is easy enough to do by feel without having full on drum noise.
 

Swiss Matthias

Platinum Member
REALLY? you need to hear yourself? I know what each drum sounds like when I hit it so whats the point of hearing it??
Not hearing my own playing doesn't make any sense to me.

It makes more sense to me to balance the music you're playing to with the sound your own instrument,
because having all strokes on the right time isn't everything. Your own sound is very important, and it's
something the greats work on all their lives along with the placement of strokes.

Also, you can't just bash the hell out of your drums (which you will probably do and not
even be aware of), you have to balance everything you play within the musical context,
which you can't do (and practice) when you're not hearing your instrument.

Again, placement isn't the only thing you want to practice, there are other parameters
that are as important in order to sound good.

Ok, hope that clarifies my "????" from my post before and settles the argument.
 

Fuo

Platinum Member
I prefer just using speakers. I'm not much into wearing headphones. I've never played to a click. I don't have anything against clicks. Just never used one. I use headphones with my computer so I can check out all these You Tube clips. The neighbors like it quiet and I like my music loud. I can't stand things in my ears. I never wear earplugs except out of total necessity.

WTF? I play the damn drums because they're acoustic. I've always prided myself on not having to use any freakin' electronics spare the occasional microphones. Technology? So what. I'm a freakin' drummer. What's with all this technical mumbo jumbo this and that? Just crank up the speakers and play some drums. Besides the drummer you're playing along to is probably playing to a click anyway.
You don't wear any protection? You may want to search on here and read some of the old threads about hearing lose and titonitis. It doesn't sound pleasant.
 
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TFITTING942

Guest
Not hearing my own playing doesn't make any sense to me.

It makes more sense to me to balance the music you're playing to with the sound your own instrument,
because having all strokes on the right time isn't everything. Your own sound is very important, and it's
something the greats work on all their lives along with the placement of strokes.

Also, you can't just bash the hell out of your drums (which you will probably do and not
even be aware of), you have to balance everything you play within the musical context,
which you can't do (and practice) when you're not hearing your instrument.

Again, placement isn't the only thing you want to practice, there are other parameters
that are as important in order to sound good.

Ok, hope that clarifies my "????" from my post before and settles the argument.
STOP taking a piece of something I said to someone else out of context!!!!! The op cant hear the music over his drums so i am saying tone down the drums. dont play softer, use soundoff because as you kind of say you need the right strokes etc. I told someone that i dont need to hear my drum basically un muted because when learning a song, I know how my snare will sound when I take the mute off? how do you not understand that???? his question is nerver answered by you, just out of context attacks on me???/
 

Swiss Matthias

Platinum Member
I can quote your other post if you like:
what I have been doing lately works for me. I use in ear buds and I have sound-off drum silencers. I cant even hear my drums which is perfect because I know what they sound like and the important thing is following along with the ipod, not hearing what im playing.
Here you explained what you are doing lately, so I think I'm perfectly in context. You're
talking about not hearing yourself, and finding it ok. I'm talking about why I'm finding
that not at all ok. Ok?

Btw I wanted to PM you back, but either you disabled PMs, or the mods don't
let you receive them anymore.
 

Skulmoski

Gold Member
Just wanted to share this private message I got from TFITTING942:

"No shit smart ass? when i play live i get to hear mine. guess you dont gig at all. the OP said he cant hear the music over his drums and is having trouble learning the songs. if he quiets the drums down he will be able to hear the music . make sence fuck face???"

Sucks to be you.

GJS
 
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TFITTING942

Guest
Real class act posting somones PM.

for the record the mods have nothing to do with me leaving this forum.
 

Drummertist

Silver Member
First, are you guys 5 years old? Did he steal your juicie cup and now you want playskool revenge? Grow up.

Second, I listen to songs on my iPhone through some cheap earbuds. I like to hear my drums while I'm playing. I like hearing what my drumming sounds like instead of just imagining that I play like Buddy Rich (which I obviously can't do). This way I can tell if my strokes or timing is off slightly or if I didn't end a fill at exactly the right time.

When practicing single or double strokes, do you clog your ears and just "imagine" that they sound even or do you listen? This idea applies to everything I play.
 

uniongoon

Gold Member
Wow, some of you guys have a narrow line of vision. I have been "listening" to my drums and the attack, volume, accuracy etc for 30 + years. If I am learning a song structure, I really don't need to be "listening" to my dynamics. I have good control, there is a time for that stuff, and mostly that work is done live. If you are honestly trying to learn someone elses song, hearing what they do is alot easier when you are not ghosting them with your own playing. And to criticize a guy for that is just plain amateur hour.
 

MikeM

Platinum Member
If I am learning a song structure, I really don't need to be "listening" to my ... If you are honestly trying to learn someone elses song, hearing what they do is alot easier when you are not ghosting them with your own playing.
I didn't realize that this was just about learning someone else's song or drumpart. At least, that's not how I read the OP. So then there are at least two ways I would look at this:

1. If I'm trying to learn a cover song, then I'll spend most of that time not trying to play along. In that case, I mostly just listen, followed by a bunch of air drumming until I *think* I know it. Then to really get it, run the songs thru headphones and play along. I still want to be able to hear what I'm doing, though. I'm confused about how you'd get any useful feedback if you're not hearing yourself. (it's not about admiring the awesome sound of your kit with foamies in under cans blaring music) But I suppose if going through the motions and feeling the sticks is enough... Anyway, I don't play in cover bands so this issue rarely comes up.

2. I practice along to music all the time just for my own kicks. For that, it's the same thing with blasting songs thru my headphones and I promote myself to lead drummer in what is now a two drummer band! Again, I want to hear what I'm doing because usually I'm pushing the envelope and I want to get a sense of what works and what doesn't. It's just practice after all.

But I guess I get where someone might not be concerned with hearing themselves playing along. It's all good. Not sure where the drama's coming from on this one.
 

Nuka

Senior Member
Senhiesser 215 over the ear headphones or a pair of headphones we used at the O2 Academy music venue with a Vi6 mixing desk... so we could monitor the mix from headphones rather than by ear in an empty venue. Great quality!

But I find that sometimes my drums come over the headphones too much. In those instances, standard iPod earbuds with firing range grade ear defenders.

Oh btw, love the troll on here go and rage quit some more :)
 

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
You don't wear any protection? You may want to search on here and read some of the old threads about hearing lose and titonitis. It doesn't sound pleasant.
I know it sounds stupid. I'm sure if I played big gigs more often, I'd do that. But I like to hear all the sound. I've had a little bit of tinnitus after a loud concert or rehearsal, and sometimes I have to sleep with the TV on to drown out the ringing a little. On the flip side, I never crank up ear buds or headphones too much. I just can't stand hearing my drums all muted.

I agree though, you're right. Will I change? Probably not until something bad happens. Then it'll be too late.
 
Do to my job and the fact I like to hear. I play with foam ear plugs with headphones on. I guess I play loud enough I still hear what im doing with the music so its great.
 

Swiss Matthias

Platinum Member
I didn't realize that this was just about learning someone else's song or drumpart. At least, that's not how I read the OP. So then there are at least two ways I would look at this:

1. If I'm trying to learn a cover song, then I'll spend most of that time not trying to play along. In that case, I mostly just listen
^ This. Plus I'm probably writing myself a sheet. I guess the OP didn't mean learning song structures though.
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
I can't play drums at home so I play a small practice pad set to an iPod in its docking station. All very quiet, and I'm tapping quietly too.

I've been working on retaining goove and energy at increasingly low volumes for a couple of years now and it's getting to the point where if I'm careful I can play without waking Dad up :)

One day I'm going to be able to set up in the house - a kit is so much better when working on tone production and hi hat / cymbal effects.
 

Mark_S

Silver Member
I use Beyer Dynamic DT100 headphones.

http://www.theheadphonecompany.co.uk/headphones/beyerdynamic-headphones-beyerdynamic-dt100-headphones-grey-400-ohm.php

I think they are fairly popular in studios. I basically use an overhead condensor mic, feed it into a mixer and mix the drum sound with the music and put it all through the headphones. It seems to work really well for me at least. There's no need to completely isolate the drums, I think these headphones cut out enough and are pretty comfy and not too heavy like some.

I used to use speakers years ago but this is infinitely better.
 

Brundlefly

Senior Member
I use EX-29's just like others but I wear them over EIMs for as much isolation as possible. I then have my kit miked and that is mixed with a feed from an iPad that sits behind the kit. This lets me hear the entire kit mixed well with the music while keeping the volume ultra low.
 

denisri

Silver Member
My approach is as follows:
Listen to song
Write out song structure and main beats and fills/kicks
Work the song out at low volume and slower speed if required.
Bring up to full speed
Use my IPad and earphone....adjust my playing volume to hear song
Denis
 

uniongoon

Gold Member
Do you play the music on headphones or on speakers? I have big speakers and am lucky enough to have a sound proof room, but whenever I wear ear protection (like I can barely hear the music over my drums and keep going off beat. Is it better to play music over headphones? It seems like that would be bad for your hearing. How do you guys practice?
OK, the OP was not crystal clear on intentions, a couple people interpreted differently (just like religion lol)

I just wasn't impressed by the abrupt sarcasm a helpful poster got for posting his ideas. And personally, I used to jam out for hours with huge speakers and or headphones, like 6-8 hours a day. That is why I am pretty hearing damaged now. And more often than not, I learn new songs by one or two listens in the car on the way to the gig, jump on stage 123 go.
 
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