How do you clean your hardware?

alex.56

Well-known member
In this lockdown period, I wanted to clean my drums, in particular, the hardware. Al my cymbals stands are new so they are already clean, but my hoops are so dirty. I once cleaned all my hoops with a degreaser but it was on a cheap drum so even if it caused some problems I didn't care, but now I want to clean my Dw performance snare and I don't want it to be ruined. So I was wondering how do you clean your hoops? Do you do this monthly, once a year, every week? Thank you!


Snare.jpeg
This is my super dirty snare,pls help mee!!
 

ineedaclutch

Platinum Member
Well it appears that you have some corrosion and rust to deal with. I assume you live near the ocean. Those rusty tension rods told me that. I have a few drums like that from years of island gigs.

This is what I do.

I would take the hoops and tension rods and soak them in water with dish soap, then scrub them to remove as much dirt, salt, and oil as possible.

You can then use aluminum foil and coke to scrub the hoops. It works wonders and will not scratch the chrome as the chrome is harder than the aluminum foil. You could use water instead of coke, but I find the coke helps. Replace the aluminum foil often as it flattens out.

Follow this with another dish soap scrub and polish with Nevr-Dull as @cbphoto mentioned, or a chrome polish or wax.

For the tension rods: same process with the soap and scrub. I put them in a drill and hold a scrub brush or two toothbrushes, held like tongs, and run them through that. I little gun oil, graphite, or your lubricant of choice, and they are done.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
Thank you, how often do you do this?
Long answer:
I lived in an old house (built in 1890) for twenty years. My kit was in the basement, where there was moisture from the clay sub-floor and surrounding brick walls. The kit was a Sonor Force 3000, with their triple-treated chrome hardware. When I first saw minor corrosion on the hardware, I kinda lost my mind. A friend of mine, a gun owner/hobbyist, informed me about the corrosive nature of the basement and turned me on to Nevr-Dull. That’s when I began a once-per-year month of cleaning. I’d take one or two stands and rub ‘em down. I disassemble the drums ‘cuz the satin finish on the drum shells would show the oil from the Nevr-Dull wads. I’d do one drum a day, try to make a zen-like experience out of it, not rushing, drinking beer and laughing loud enough that my kids would think maintaining gear is one of life’s pleasures (it worked with my oldest, but the other two knew I was faking it).

I’m now in a different home, where the drums are not exposed to so much moisture, and the process is: rub it down when needed. About every two years.

If you live by the ocean, I recommend not wiping off the oil residue from Nevr-Dull. Leave in on to help protect the metal.

TL;DR: About once every year or two.

674D56A1-CD59-4946-8AC1-CCEAB6D43DE6.jpeg
 

alex.56

Well-known member
Well it appears that you have some corrosion and rust to deal with. I assume you live near the ocean. Those rusty tension rods told me that. I have a few drums like that from years of island gigs.

This is what I do.

I would take the hoops and tension rods and soak them in water with dish soap, then scrub them to remove as much dirt, salt, and oil as possible.

You can then use aluminum foil and coke to scrub the hoops. It works wonders and will not scratch the chrome as the chrome is harder than the aluminum foil. You could use water instead of coke, but I find the coke helps. Replace the aluminum foil often as it flattens out.

Follow this with another dish soap scrub and polish with Nevr-Dull as @cbphoto mentioned, or a chrome polish or wax.

For the tension rods: same process with the soap and scrub. I put them in a drill and hold a scrub brush or two toothbrushes, held like tongs, and run them through that. I little gun oil, graphite, or your lubricant of choice, and they are done.
You're right i live near the sea. Thank you i'll try to do this way!!
 

ottog1979

Senior Member
Every few years I clean al my stands with this, a tooth brush and some sports watching on TV. Time consuming , but they look brand new afterwards. shopping.jpeg
 

ottog1979

Senior Member
Also used the Turtle Wax Chrome Polish on all my drum hardware when re- wrapping a few years back. It safely takes off rust and other corrosion.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I've never experienced corrosion or rust on any piece of hardware. I dust hardware with a dry Swiffer cloth. If I note a smudge, I remove it with a damp paper towel and dry the surface immediately.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Aluminum foil and warm water for chrome. Dont ever use Coke. Would you pour acid on your drums? That's what happens when you use Coke. Its unnecessary, sticky, and an all around bad idea.

The water creates a chemical reaction between the foil and chrome. The water turns into a paste that removes any surface dirt and rust. When it turns dark just wipe it off with a clean towel. It's really that easy.

Use science, not force and chemicals.
 

Ransan

Senior Member
In my experience buying old Ludwig Hercules stands which conditions vary, no matter I immediately take them apart and clean them. I have had great results using the water/coke and tinfoil method.
It cleans the light rust and a bit of elbow grease gets more stubborn rust blotches. If you find that it is not working, I just get a new side of foil or a new tin in general to break it up.
Though it doesn’t clean back to new it does a surprisingly good job, I recommend looking into.
 
Last edited:

Ransan

Senior Member
I can't be the only person that never cleaned a stand.

Absolutely fascinating, your species.
If kept contained and somewhat maintained that’s fine.
I have rescued some crusty Ludwig Hercules clip mount stands that have been through the depths of hell.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Even my gig hardware which I've been using for like 16 years...the thought never even occurred to me to polish them.
 

ottog1979

Senior Member
Even my new-ish stands get dirty after 2-3 years of gigging. Sweaty hands packing up at the end of a gig, beer spillage, flying sweat while playing, dust & stick material, you name it. Spend an hour or two with a tooth brush & some rags and you'll be blown away how dirty they were and how clean when finished.
 

alex.56

Well-known member
Long answer:
I lived in an old house (built in 1890) for twenty years. My kit was in the basement, where there was moisture from the clay sub-floor and surrounding brick walls. The kit was a Sonor Force 3000, with their triple-treated chrome hardware. When I first saw minor corrosion on the hardware, I kinda lost my mind. A friend of mine, a gun owner/hobbyist, informed me about the corrosive nature of the basement and turned me on to Nevr-Dull. That’s when I began a once-per-year month of cleaning. I’d take one or two stands and rub ‘em down. I disassemble the drums ‘cuz the satin finish on the drum shells would show the oil from the Nevr-Dull wads. I’d do one drum a day, try to make a zen-like experience out of it, not rushing, drinking beer and laughing loud enough that my kids would think maintaining gear is one of life’s pleasures (it worked with my oldest, but the other two knew I was faking it).

I’m now in a different home, where the drums are not exposed to so much moisture, and the process is: rub it down when needed. About every two years.

If you live by the ocean, I recommend not wiping off the oil residue from Nevr-Dull. Leave in on to help protect the metal.

TL;DR: About once every year or two.

View attachment 92081
Thank youu!
Aluminum foil and warm water for chrome. Dont ever use Coke. Would you pour acid on your drums? That's what happens when you use Coke. Its unnecessary, sticky, and an all around bad idea.

The water creates a chemical reaction between the foil and chrome. The water turns into a paste that removes any surface dirt and rust. When it turns dark just wipe it off with a clean towel. It's really that easy.

Use science, not force and chemicals.
I'm going to use aluminum foil, and if it doesn't work I will use nevr-dull hoping I won't ruin my hardware. Thank you, I didn't know how to use aluminum foil to clean chromes.
 

alex.56

Well-known member
In my experience buying old Ludwig Hercules stands which conditions vary, no matter I immediately take them apart and clean them. I have had great results using the water/coke and tinfoil method.
It cleans the light rust and a bit of elbow grease gets more stubborn rust blotches. If you find that it is not working, I just get a new side of foil or a new tin in general to break it up.
Though it doesn’t clean back to new it does a surprisingly good job, I recommend looking into.
Thank you, as I see aluminum foil is very useful
 
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