How do folks keep o-rings in place?

BruceW

Senior Member
Before I start, I apologize, I did try and search for an answer before posting...the search function won't recognize the o in o-ring, sadly.

So...I have used o-rings on my toms to keep the sound controlled. I have been keeping them on the toms using small pieces of tape. I just changed heads, and I don't want to use tape and gunk the new heads up.

But...I want to keep the o-ring on the drum when I pack them up. I don't have any sort of way to store them otherwise. I can't envision a way to store them, and transport them to and from gigs, if i don't have them attached to the drums.

How do you folks handle o-rings in a gigging environment?
Thanks
 

Bozozoid

Well-known member
I only use one on my 16 floor which sorry to say I use tiny pieces of rock-n-roll tape at 12-3-6-and 9. TINY pieces.
 

iwearnohats

Silver Member
How do you folks handle o-rings in a gigging environment?
Thanks
Honestly, I never used them gigging. If you dislike the overtones, please go listen to Simon Phillips play drums - it will transform your perception of how your drums sound.

If you're absolutely convinced that you still want a "controlled" sound then I would recommend using heads like Remo Pinstripes or Aquarian Studio-X heads, that will solve the O-ring problem.

Check out this video (Start from about 4:30 if you're impatient)
to hear what drums are meant to sound like :)
 

Lee-Bro

Senior Member
I use them from time to time and when I play an outdoor gig, I use a couple small pieces of gaffer's tape to keep them in place. Gaffer's tape doesn't leave a residue on the heads.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I only use Snareweights on my toms whenever I'm close-miked (which is 99% of the time). I'm all about signal chain. I don't want the sound guy to fool around with gates and compression if he doesn't have to. Just throw a Snareweight on it and be done in 2 seconds as opposed to hitting the rack tom for 10 minutes while he adjusts the sound from the board. YMMV.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
Check out this video (Start from about 4:30 if you're impatient)
to hear what drums are meant to sound like :)
geez. This guy blows my mind.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
So...I have used o-rings on my toms to keep the sound controlled. I have been keeping them on the toms using small pieces of tape. I just changed heads, and I don't want to use tape and gunk the new heads up.
You'll probably get superior results by shunning the tape solution. Taping an o-ring to a head is contrary to the ring's functionality. It's not designed to cling to a head the way Moongel does. The ring is fashioned to float uninterruptedly. When the head is struck, the ring should elevate slightly, then return to its resting position. Its purpose is to abbreviate sustain, not to smother it.

I used o-rings on occasion when I had Coated Ambassadors on every drum, but now that I have a Coated P3 on my snare and Coated Pinstripes on my toms and bass, I have no need for rings at all.
 
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Neal Pert

Well-known member
I keep all the various type of muffling rings and devices in an 18" H&B cymbal bag that I keep near the drums. Pizza box would also work, for sure. Or just leave them on the drums when you pack them into cases.

Sometimes things like the BFSD and the RootsEQ are the perfect thing for a quick, impermanent change of tone for a song or two.
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
I keep a set in the bottom of my snare case just in case I’m in a church or restaurant where I really need to control the volume whilst also needing a deep sound. My largest floor tom is 14”, so all the rings fit in the snare cae.
 

iwearnohats

Silver Member
The sound crew with Simon are well acquainted with gates...and NOT the gates prior to entering the studio.
I've never had a problem live or in the studio with my unmuffled heads :) if anything I would frequently get compliments on how good the drums sounded and how easy they were to get sounding good out front :)
 

BruceW

Senior Member
Thanks for the replies.

I use bags for the drums currently, not hard cases. (Someday I'll have hard cases, all it takes is money) The rings will come loose and get folded and bent.

The pizza box is the best solution of the bunch, so far. It would be perfect if i had another gear box that such a pizza box would fit in, alas, not currently. I have to try and minimize things that I bring and pack efficiently, my gear goes in the band trailer. to more ideas...
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
Thanks for the replies.

I use bags for the drums currently, not hard cases. (Someday I'll have hard cases, all it takes is money) The rings will come loose and get folded and bent.

The pizza box is the best solution of the bunch, so far. It would be perfect if i had another gear box that such a pizza box would fit in, alas, not currently. I have to try and minimize things that I bring and pack efficiently, my gear goes in the band trailer. to more ideas...
If you're set on using rings, simply collect all the rings on the largest drum inside its bag. Then put a spare drumhead upside down on top of them, it will nestle inside the rim and the bag will hold the whole thing in place.
 

Neal Pert

Well-known member
Oh, another possibility: Some models of Beato bags have a compartment on top for a spare head. That'd be perfect.
 

Woolwich

Silver Member
If by O Rings you mean the type of thing I use , studio rings, I just leave them in place on the drums, if I'm not using them I lay them in the drum bag while I'm gigging and put them in place at the end of the night.

I'm with Porkpieguy on their use. Un mic'd I don't use them on my toms. Mic'd it's an effective real world solution for people like me who play in a pub band to get a great tom sound in 5 seconds without the time and stress of retuning or getting our bass player to work out how to do it on our pub spec band desk. I'm not even sure it's got noise gates on it but that doesn't matter because I've got my studio rings.
 
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