how common is it to crash the "ride" cymbal?

georgeusa

Member
how common is it to crash the "ride" cymbal?

does it give a much deeper sound than what a large crash would give?

any particular drummers who crash the "ride" cymbal?

thanks
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
"How common is it to crash the ride cymbal?"

It's very common among some players, though I don't do it, even though my 21" ride is extremely thin and highly crashable. It's technically a crash-ride, in fact. I just prefer to crash my crashes, as they're positioned in the path of my comfort zone for crashing. My ride is pretty low and extended over my bass drum. Riding it is more natural than crashing it to me.

"Does it give a much deeper sound than what a large crash would give?"

It depends upon the profiles of the rides and crashes in question. In general terms, the larger the diameter, the lower the tonal output, though weight and other characteristics shape sonic specifics as well.
 
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C.M. Jones

Well-known member
. . .so I tend to not use a pingy/heavy ride (except where I need that specific sound.)
I recently switched to Zildjian's A Avedis series (Zildjian's "vintage" line) and am playing a 21" crash-ride. It has a very thin profile, the thinnest I've ever owned in a ride. I'm liking it a lot more than many of the ping-oriented rides I've played over the years. The bell still has cut, and the bow is articulate, but its woody, mellow voice is wonderfully musical.
 
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sumdrumguy

Senior Member
When things really get going, I love laying into my ride. All of my rides are crashable. (y):D

I recently switched to a set of Zildjian A Avedis cymbals (Zildjian's "vintage" line) and am playing a 21" crash-ride from the series. It has a very thin profile, the thinnest I've ever owned in a ride. I'm liking it a lot more than many of the ping-oriented rides I've played over the years. The bell still has cut, and the bow is articulate, but its woody, mellow voice is wonderfully musical.
Sound like my Meinl 22" Stadium Ride. It has a oversized bell, but the bow thins quickly and the edge feels like it will cut you.
 

Quai34

Junior Member
At first, Imhad only two 16" and while they were crashes, I felt them very hard to crash (Medium heavy and heavy) same with the ride (Super Heavy ping ride, all 3 cymbals were Avedis 70's, made in Canada).
So, I tried to have ride that could be crashable and I did, with the 23" A Custom sweet ride and AAX Raw Bell Dry Ride but yes, even the groove ride, they feel heavy in the stick at least for me...Now that Image a lot of crashes, I don't crash them at all, almost...
 

brushes

Well-known member
Almost all jazzdrummers crash their rides. Some rockdrummers and metaldrummers also crash their rides, but as said, it depends on the ride and musical situation.

I have two rides, one left and one right hand and a crash/ ride on the far right. All of them are used as crashes and rides. By the way, the label ride and crash is rather "modern". Back in the days, there were only cymbals with diameter and weight information and it was up to the drummer to use the cymbals as they felt appropriate. The "new" Avedis line reflects that, as it consists only of "cymbals", not crashes or rides.
 

Old Dog new Cans

Senior Member
Starting out in the 80s, NEVER. Literally sounded horrible to our ears. That included jazz band. We always had a big fat ride in school. Heavy.

Nowadays, I experiment with it more. But, I'm still having trouble getting used to that. I'm a rock drummer.
 

Bozozoid

Well-known member
Well?..using a 22" paiste 2002 I don't crash it as I would a (crash) cymbal but when all hell is breaking loose on stage I'm riding it at times as if it's a crash/ride and the rare instance I do decide to crash that %#?!!..its with the shaft of my 5b on the meat of the bow.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I also use 2 rides, right and left. Sometimes I will crash the right one for a big, washy, saturating cymbal sound. I never crash the pingy left one.
 

Ransan

Senior Member
how common is it to crash the "ride" cymbal?

does it give a much deeper sound than what a large crash would give?

any particular drummers who crash the "ride" cymbal?

thanks
Very common to crash the rides. I would say old Zildjians, Sabian Vanguards, Paiste 2002s, and GBs are cream of the crop, very beautiful instruments for crashable rides.

Sounds can be very bright and ping with thicker cymbal profile or heavier weight to dark and complex low crash pitch on a thin cymbal profile with raw lathe and hammering technique.

Tomas Haake uses any where from 2-3 rides on his set up, his 22” HHX heavy ride is his mainstay, he commonly may switch out the others for a Groove, or Evo Ride, even will break out 23” crash/ride.

He uses them ALL to crash on and is quoted as saying with a straight face ‘I don’t use rides anymore’.
 
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Ransan

Senior Member
Strike point on heavy rides is important. Not like a medium or rock crash that will build wash on the edge.

When I want to crash on my AAX Metal ride, I’ll lay a strike with most of my stick across the top profile of the cymbal, more on bow than shoulder and bell.

The sound then is a bright ping and very punchy crash that sounds completely different.
 
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