Holy Grail of the Drum World?

drumbandit

Silver Member
For me the holy grail snare is the Brady solid hollow tree trunk.

Chris Brady made the world's first hollowed out tree trunk snare and there aren't many in the world. They're almost impossible to find.

Sound wise they're unique but I also love the backstory and craftsmanship.

I also adore finding left handed cymbals
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry" - Administrator
Staff member
Submitted for your approval: Guru drums.

The tympanic bearing edges, (which work really well) segmented construction, lightweight hardware and minimal finish make for a really resonant shell. The cabinet grade (meaning really dark) walnut was a huge bonus.

My other Guru kit, is a steambent ash that has zero holes in the shell. Zero. Everything is attached to an external re-ring. They sound amazingly resonant.

In my mind I can't top these kits. I can't think of any improvements. They are my personal holy grail of drums.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
Submitted for your approval: Guru drums.

The tympanic bearing edges, (which work really well) segmented construction, lightweight hardware and minimal finish make for a really resonant shell. The cabinet grade (meaning really dark) walnut was a huge bonus.

My other Guru kit, is a steambent ash that has zero holes in the shell. Zero. Everything is attached to an external re-ring. They sound amazingly resonant.

In my mind I can't top these kits. I can't think of any improvements. They are my personal holy grail of drums.

Andy seems to really be especially focused on the relative thinness of his shells in terms of achieving that wonderful pre-EQ’d tone. What do you think?
 

afj617

New Member
I do not know if this is considered vintage or 80s but I got my hands on a sonor signature bubinga kit for 1,300$ in 2003. I agree beauty is in the eye of the beholder and my holy grail drums are ones that exist in my imagination only. Like if Sonor SQ2 offered more thicknesses, different edges and shells made of walnut, cherry, bubinga, or even a full cast bronze kit.
 

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caddywumpus

Archnemesis of Larryace
There are many “grail” pieces of gear that people tout. They could be grails because they’re rare and expensive (Gladstone drum sets, vintage Ludwig top hat and cane kits, old K cymbals, Cadillac Green round badge kits, etc…), or they could be grails because they sound great or are legendary (any number of commonly-produced vintage kits, cymbals of certain models/eras, etc…). I’m more in the camp of a “grail” being a piece of gear that makes you happy in some way. If you’re a collector, go ahead and gush with your $100,000 “only 4 were made” drum set. If you’re a player, be happy with that snare you love or that cymbal that will take you years to fully explore its sonic palette and realize its full potential.

I’m happy with my gear, and I wish the same for everybody else!
 

Hypercaffium

Active Member
"Holy grail", objectively speaking, doesn't exist.
Personally I use what I need, what I like, what works well and costs the right amount of money for me. I couldn't care less about blazoned/high end/vintage gear everybody talks about and very few actually play.
 
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