hinger technique?

ronyd

Silver Member
ed soph mentions playing quarters on the ride using hinger technique on the upstroke getting ready to play the next downstroke, ie next quarter note. anyone know how this is executed?
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
Do you mean "finger" technique? I've never heard of "hinger" methodology.

For the most part, Soph employs French Grip (thumbs up) on ride patterns, making use of both the wrists and fingers to control the stick. Being an exclusively German Grip (palms down, thumbs on sides of stick) player, I don't follow Soph's ride recommendations at all, though they may be useful to those who favor French Grip.

Here's a brief video of Soph's ride technique:
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
A Hinger-style timpani stroke, I guess. At USC I knew a great drummer named Jeff Falcone-- he was another student, who had studied with Soph. He told us about an exercise of Soph's, which involved timpani-like strokes, with a lot of lift. Basically a jazz cymbal rhythm @ ~40 bpm, with full strokes on every note. Hinger's technique is described here:
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
A Hinger-style timpani stroke, I guess. At USC I knew a great drummer named Jeff Falcone-- he was another student, who had studied with Soph. He told us about an exercise of Soph's, which involved timpani-like strokes, with a lot of lift. Basically a jazz cymbal rhythm @ ~40 bpm, with full strokes on every note. Hinger's technique is described here:
Interesting. Jazz/orchestra isn't my genre, which I guess explains my lack of familiarity with this approach.
 

eddypierce

Senior Member
ed soph mentions playing quarters on the ride using hinger technique on the upstroke getting ready to play the next downstroke, ie next quarter note. anyone know how this is executed?
The "Hinger technique" is named for the famous percussionist Fred Hinger, who was known for both his tympani playing as well as his snare drum technique. If I'm not mistaken, the "Hinger technique" refers to the type of stroke Hinger would generally use when playing tympani. It's a type of French grip, with the thumbs on top of the stick, but the stroke is made not with the fingers but by rotating the forearm. If you put both your hands together in a praying position and then turn them down away from you (while keeping your palms together), that will give you an idea of the motion involved.

I think Soph is advocating that one primarily play quarter notes on the ride cymbal with the Hinger technique.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
The Hinger technique should really be called the Schwar technique. Leopold Stokowski brought his timpanist from Europe, a Dutchman names Oskar Schwar, when he became conductor of the Philadelphia Orchestra. Hinger became timpanist of the orchestra about 5 years after Schwar died, and the technique was explained to him by the percussionists with the orchestra who had played beside Schwar. Hinger never actually studied with Schwar, but that’s where the technique originated.

It’s very similar to the Cleveland technique taught by Cloyd Duff of the Cleveland Orchestra. Duff studied directly with Schwar before he got the Cleveland timpani job. He modified the technique to work with the very live acoustic in Severance Hall in Cleveland. The Academy of Music in Philly is a much drier room, and you can get away with a heavier, fuller stroke that includes more arm and a heavier, softer mallet.

Like mentioned above, it’s a French grip, except that the movement of the stick is accomplished with the turning of the forearm.

I personally studied for 4 years with Kalman Cherry of the Dallas Symphony, who grew up in Philly and studied with Hinger for many years. Timpani is really my main instrument, but there’s not a lot of timpani gigs. LOL
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I always enjoyed watching tympanist in civic orchestra-I don't know how they hear to tune in real time like they do. We had two and they'd let me play some to see how it feels-probably to get me to shut with all my questions LOL. Man I loved it-very powerful for orchestrations. Hinger technique and more details. Learned something new today. I like to do that everyday. Thank you all for the "learning lessons". It's really a whole different instrument than regular drums, and it always "begged the question" wondering why all bass or toms drums didn't have a bowl bottom and no reso head ?
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
About that ride cymbal exercise-- don't sweat the exact technique too much. It's not a high performance technique where you're going to fail if you don't do it right. It's more about finding a personal touch on the cymbal, with some grace to it-- it least that's what I did it, and teach it for. The key elements are to go slow and to use a lot of lift on every note, a la a timpani stroke.
 

eddypierce

Senior Member
The Hinger technique should really be called the Schwar technique.
George Lawrence Stone studied tympani with Oskar Schwar. I caught at least one reference to Schwar in Stone's "Technique of Percussion" compilation that just came out. For that matter, he mentions Hinger at least once as well, although I believe the Hinger mention was in reference to a discussion they had about teaching snare drum technique.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Anatomically, it seems like a bad way for the wrist joint to move. I was always told to not move the wrist joint like that when working a stick. Which definitely does add up in my mind. If I'm in that position anyway, why would I not use french grip using my fingers? My wrist has at the most 45 degree movement using the "praying" method. Not much. It seems like a very beginner method that has not much promise.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I love it. I always thought this was just my way of coping with playing faster than I really could. I always just hang on to the beat and add little "skip" accents to keep it not so boring as well as relieve the tension of playing the same thing quick over and over.
 
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