Hi-hat Stands

michaelg

Member
AMERICA? Some of us are proud of the flag, and the U.S.A.
With the greatest respect, I always struggle to understand some peoples obsessions with flags but if it makes you happy good on you i suppose :)

I'm from a small county in Europe and sometimes I like my Country, sometimes not, with the huge increase in homelessness, corruption and bad decisions by my government its very hard to be proud sometimes.

If i was from Denmark or another Scandinavian country, i might feel proud then, they do a good job with how they run things IMHO

I always liked Bill Hicks take on Patriotism :)

Apologies for the digression, back to hihats
 

Wave Deckel

Gold Member
I just don't get the extremely wide price differences between hi-hat stands.

What does a stand that costs $279 do that's different than my $59 stand? Is it only about stability?

Educate me!
Take a look at e.g. a Yamaha HS650A and a HS1200D.

650A: Single braced, three legs. Single chain. Simple clutch without protection against keyholes. Thinner tubes. Spikes at footplate gate. Thinner, lighter footplate design. Non-adjustible spring-tension. Lightweight.

1200D: Much beefier. Direct pull drive that gives more linear power distribution. Perfectly made super-smooth direct drive-mechanism. Double braced legs, two legs can be tilted and rotated. Spikes in legs with pressure-mechanism for fast setup. Additional spikes at solid footplate, adjustments for spring tension and footboard height. Easier to set up with multiple foot-pedals e.g. doublepedals for bassdrums (narrow design), thicker tubes, better quality tension-locks. Superior cymbal seat with self-locking angle adjustment and reversible washer (felt and rubber, the 800, 700, 600-versions only have felt). Better and sturdier clutch-design with cymbal protection against keyholes that won't loosen. Two pull rod lengths to choose.

Better product quality, thicker and heavier, more options for setup and individual adjustment. That's what you pay for. A simple HS650A will do the job in many cases. But it won't give you the little extra and struggle with bigger/heavier hats.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
I just don't get the extremely wide price differences between hi-hat stands.

What does a stand that costs $279 do that's different than my $59 stand? Is it only about stability?

Educate me!
Here's what I've learned over the years and years of doing one-niters and endless set-ups and tear-downs: the more expensive stuff seems to last longer, and require less maintenance. But this would mean you are also moving and using your stuff around as much too. If you aren't, then by all means keep doing what you're doing. But, if like me, you take calls at the last minute and throw your kit into the car for a gig, and do that a few times on a weekly basis, sometimes for several nights (it's been a while since I've hustled that much), the last thing you need to be doing when playing with new, strange musicians in a venue you've never been to is dealing with equipment you're not sure of.

So I eliminate the possibility of any kind of break down by just having the best stuff I can afford.

The argument made here about the higher prices keeping you from buying other things is a fallacy when you know that you have what you need to cover the gig {A whole other conversation about what instruments to use on a job - which to me, is a basic 4-piece kit, with hi-hats, crash, and ride cymbal, and a cowbell - I figure if you can't do a gig with just that, then there's something wrong}. I can do a gig with the basics, I just don't want to have to worry about anything breaking on me at some inopportune time. So I've noticed I've been using my heavy hardware a lot more lately since I also have lightweight flat-based stands too. Even more so I think it's important as I play out less and less, since there's less time spent out playing, I don't want those times marred by a broken piece of gear, either.

But, on the more expensive hi-hat stand, everything just works smoother. I'm not having to tighten things down as hard. Once I set the stand, it never slides around on me. It can handle my big 17" hi-hats, and spring tensions are adjustable. The clutch that comes with it is top-notch (although I carry spares, I've never had to use one in all my time of using heavy stands).

So just by it being slightly bigger and heavier, gives me that secure feeling. That's worth the extra $220 to me.
 

opentune

Platinum Member
The argument made here about the higher prices keeping you from buying other things is a fallacy when you know that you have what you need to cover the gig
Well hope no offense was taken by you. My statement was a little tongue-in-cheek. Sure, you're professional, buy a professional stand. If you're an occasional gigger (which I believe Mitch to be), it appears his $59 stand is suiting him fine, which it seems to be by his OP. Will there be that much difference?
My other point would be, (not tongue in cheek), that Matt Bo Eder will sound the same with a $59 stand as he does with a $279 one. So does this guy on his rather modest stand.
 
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Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Well hope no offense was taken by you. My statement was a little tongue-in-cheek. Sure, you're professional, buy a professional stand. If you're an occasional gigger (which I believe Mitch to be), it appears his $59 stand is suiting him fine, which it seems to be by his OP. Will there be that much difference?
My other point would be, (not tongue in cheek), that Matt Bo Eder will sound the same with a $59 stand as he does with a $279 one. So does this guy on his rather modest stand.
I love me some Max! I've watched that video so many times now....

But the stand Max is using is a (now) vintage Ludwig Atlas from the 80s - those were the state-of-the-art when they came out. Hi-hats got really complicated after Tama and Pearl started pushing the envelope in the 80s. It's all their fault!

I did point out that if our OP doesn't work that much, then he's fine with what he's using. But if he did upgrade, he wouldn't have to upgrade ever again. ;)
 

Wave Deckel

Gold Member
Do you notice the difference when playing? Yes. The difference in the smoothness, the sturdyness, you really feel it. Well,... I feel it. Still, you basically do not need the most expensive hihat-stand (I play with a Yamaha 640A now and then and it gets the job done with 14" hats, but my HS1200D is muuuuuuuch better and smoother). If you get a good middle-class stand, like e.g. an IronCobra 600, you should do well and it won't cost you an arm and a leg.
 

MikeM

Platinum Member
I'm not much for spending a lot on over-engineered hardware, but that doesn't mean the spendy stuff doesn't sometimes offer enough benefit to make it worth it.

If you've tolerated and gotten used to a rickety throne, then suddenly found yourself on a nice solid one, you'll know that something that appears over-engineered actually has a practical reason to exist. (my RocNSoc made a believer outta me later in life)

Hi hat stands are similar, but it depends on how you use your left foot. Based on what I see out in drummerland, a significant chunk of drummers plant their left foot down on the HH pedal and leave it there motionless for majority of the time they're playing. It's like a binary open or closed with almost nothing in between.

If that's how you play, great, but it won't make much sense to go all in on a stupidly expensive HH stand.

On the other hand, an exceptionally playable HH stand works wonders for an active HH foot and for really modulating the force holding the cymbals together.

One of my frustrations was not feeling like I had enough leverage to hold a larger pair of hats closed tight enough to not sound sloppy, so I looked for a stand that had some kind of cam or lever action to give me that extra mechanical advantage, but also smooth enough to not snap open hard. I also detest the feel of a footboard inclined too steeply and find wobbly two leggers deeply annoying.

With that list of criteria, only the DW9000 ticked all the boxes, and it was $280. I'm usually pretty cheap with hardware (no double braced cymbal stands; prefer my $200 Iron Cobra over every other pedal I've played, etc) but I would've paid $500 for my HH stand. Did I mention that it's by far my heaviest piece of hardware and a total PITA to drag to gigs? It's true, but I don't care. It's worth it.

For me and how I play, the HH stand is just as important as the BD pedal or choice of sticks.
 

MrPockets

Gold Member
I got a DW9000 Hi Hat stand off Craigslist for $100. It is the smoothest pedal I have ever used.

While the sturdiness is about the same as my old Yamaha, the pedal action is much more sensitive.
 
G

Ghostnote

Guest
AMERICA? Some of us are proud of the flag, and the U.S.A.
Hey, you do you breh, it was just a joke, not a dig or a political satire. I guess I'm not really a fiercely PROUD Canadian, but I'm awfully glad I live here and am very appreciative of the fact that I'm luckier than the majority of people on the planet by virtue of the location in which I live in regard to gov't, resources, opportunities, etc. There's no country more similar in most ways to the States than Canada...
 

hippy chip

Silver Member
After reading some of the replies on this I decided to do a little testing. My lowly PDP 2-leg stand was able to handle a pair of 16" crashes no problem---on padded carpet, and it was still not wobbly.
 

GAW

Senior Member
I have an experience I'd like to share cause it taught me a couple of things...

I was about to do the ebay roulette and buy a used hihat that I'd never tried. Then I had a moment of clarity and thought "eff it, I'll go and TRY SOME OUT" and boy am I glad I did.

I ended up with a Mapex Armory stand for £89 (10 quid knocked off cause it was the last in store, ex-display). I was very pleasantly surprised just how smooth and responsive the action was, it's very well built, rock solid and I'm really pleased with it.

Thing is, I'd never have even considered a Mapex til I went into that shop. I thought I'd want an iron cobra (couldn't afford the 900 but I reckoned a 200 would be good enough) or a yamaha 6/700. They had a limited range to try out but I got to have a go with the yammy, the tama cobra 200, mapex armory and Mars, and a dw 5000. To be honest, I couldn't tell a huge difference in action between the armory and dw, certainly not enough to justify the 300% price difference. The tama and yamaha were fine, I'm sure they'd do the job admirably, but when you put them alongside the mapex it's stunning how much more you get for your money with that stand. The pull action has a link and sort of cam thingy and, for me, it feels like a pedal worth 2 or 3 times it's price.

Whether the mapex is built well enough to last a few years is another story - it seems so, but who knows?

I took 2 things away from this:

1) go to a store and TRY STUFF OUT. Yes you pay a bit more but it opens your eyes to things you just wouldn't consider if you just trawl the Internet for suggestions. In this instance I got a far superior stand than I would have bought otherwise for the same price, so I guess I kinda saved money in a weird sort of way

2) mapex stuff is very good value, don't dismiss it offhand. I own an M-Birch, it's okay, doesn't knock my socks off, but it was dirt cheap. This stand is cheap AND sexy. A bit like me. There's a pattern forming here. Check em out along with the higher profile brands, you might be surprised.

That’s my lot. Have a nice day :)
 
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