Hi Hat Height

CommanderRoss

Silver Member
For me it's high enough that the dominate hand doing the hi-hat work doesn't hit my non-dominate hand hitting the snare.
Once I get that right, I tighten the collar.
 

ottog1979

Senior Member
Let's put more numbers on this (like Larryace)! I have 3 high hat set ups that I use with kits. Never actually measured until now but they're all 31.5-32" high from the floor to the bottom hat.
 

Kuromaku

Well-known member
From the floor to right where the hi hat top meets the hi hat bottom when closed = 29.5".
 

wraub

Well-known member
At the moment- 29.25" from the floor, 4" above the snare.
 
Thanks for posting this important topic Kuromaku! Funny thing, but just last week, while tweaking my practice kit, I went down to my acoustic set and measured the height from the floor to the bottom cymbal's edge...32.5". But that's not that important when you consider your own height, where your feet sit on the pedals, how high you sit, (what angle your thighs are), and where your hands naturally fall. All of these factors figure into the room you have to cross over and being able to play everything you need to, and still be ergonomically sound and comfortable. It's all relative to the individual. So our comparative heights and distances could be only somewhat academic.

I know when I feel tension in my trapazoid and shoulder area with the crossover arm, it's time to reevaluate. Rule of thumb...index everything!
 

Rotarded

Senior Member
I switch between traditional and matched grip frequently during gigs, depending on the song, and do a lot of hat work utilizing both hands. The hats reside at the 10 o'clock position and are 3.5 inches above my snare. Just high enough that I don't crack my knuckles doing 16th notes on the hats while cross sticking. I can't give a measure from the floor as I rotate between 3 different kits, all with different hardware, in 3 different sizes/configurations.
 
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Morrisman

Platinum Member
I used to play on the edge with the hats set high and my hand below it, until a sound engineer commented that my hats were louder than my snare. After realising he was correct, I tried lowering the hats and now play on top like a ride cymbal. The edge of the (closed) hihat is 4-5 inches above the rim of the snare.
 

Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
My "normal" set up has the hi hats 35" off the floor and about 7" above the strike zone on my snare. My hi hats are also just about as high as the strike zone on the bow of my ride cymbal.

I like to set up with a high, medium, and low level of things to hit, where everything on that level is just about the same height. Crash cymbals high, hi hat, toms, and ride in the middle, and snare and floor toms at the bottom.
 

Kuromaku

Well-known member
My "normal" set up has the hi hats 35" off the floor and about 7" above the strike zone on my snare. My hi hats are also just about as high as the strike zone on the bow of my ride cymbal.

I like to set up with a high, medium, and low level of things to hit, where everything on that level is just about the same height. Crash cymbals high, hi hat, toms, and ride in the middle, and snare and floor toms at the bottom.
I'm setup very similar to this - hats 30" from the floor, 8" above the head of my snare. My hi hat and ride are at the same height, which are at about the same height as my rack toms. My crashes are about 5" above that level. And as I noted, my snares and floor tom are about 8" lower than the hi hat level. So all in all, I only have about 13" of travel from the highest thing to hit to the lowest thing to hit.

I used to like the big, wide, almost overhead cymbals, "rock" type of setup. I now have about twice the amount of drums and cymbals compared to those days, but my footprint might actually be more compact. I think the time behind a four piece with only hats/ride/crash setup before my most recent rig helped me get tighter and more ergonomic.
 
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