Hi guys, i'm new in this site and i would like to share with you this my drumming problem

Lable Drummer

New member
Hi guys, i am Riccardo from Milan (Italy), i am 21 y.o. and it's the first time i write on this forum. I'm doing this because i play drums from the age of 10 and during these years i changed (logically :D) me as a person and particularly as a drummer. i always see drums as a sort of natural thing that came from me and not as a unique technique stuffs...I've always been undecided on what would have been my life's way, my future "work" and only in this period i feel very very close the feeling to became a professional drummer. I study for 6 years at a normal music academy in my area, but i was young and the concepts that i learned I struggle to remember them and make them truly mine in a professionally way. But the point is...i would like to start studying drums again because more and more i feel that drums are my way and it's the thing that I feel most mine! I also have a youtube channel on which I have uploaded various covers, but often I find most of my drumming routines playing songs on songs (especially metal) but this does not entail anything new and above all educational! yes of course, I try quite complex songs! but I feel that I miss the technique a lot, unlike the creativity on the set! so, how can I clear up the main drum topics to improve my technique even more? can you do this without a master following you? I would love to start a professional drumming course, studying day by day and getting better and better ... the problem is that I don't know what to study and where to start! would you help me in this?

I can't go back to class privately, for a factor of money and for a factor of people who don't teach metal in my area, but also because honestly I never liked that relationship that is established in class between "teacher and student" or am I wrong?....
i would like to became a professional metal drummer, at least this is the genre that I prefer the most, but who said that maybe during my drumming routines I will not be passionate about other more conventional genres such as funk or jazz?!


so this ... I would like to know if a person can become a professional drummer even by disciplining himself and structuring daily routines on various topics. What topics do you think I can start with? this is the main question.


p.s. sorry for my english :D
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
Welcome! It's obvious you love to play drums. I hope you get to do it for the rest of your life. I'm a drummer and teacher.

so this ... I would like to know if a person can become a professional drummer even by disciplining himself and structuring daily routines on various topics. What topics do you think I can start with? this is the main question.
No. The world is full of talented, driven musicians who are all trying to make a living at it, as much as they can. Everyone has access to YouTube videos, online lessons, and so on. But the ones who take lessons, go to university, get experience in professional or school-related bands (cover band, jazz) have a serious advantage over drummers who can't or won't, such as yourself. You cannot train yourself nearly as well as someone who attends lessons, gets experience in different bands, and accepts the "teacher-student" relationship with maturity. You obviously love playing drums - and that's very important - but so do lots of drummers.

the problem is that I don't know what to study and where to start! would you help me in this?
No one can possibly know what you should study, because they haven't seen or heard you play in person. A video cannot tell you what you are doing wrong, and can't suggest an effective way to improve.

You should also realize that getting lessons, experience, a university degree -- none of this guarantees that you'll become a successful drummer. But it will at least improve your chances.
 

Lable Drummer

New member
Welcome! It's obvious you love to play drums. I hope you get to do it for the rest of your life. I'm a drummer and teacher.



No. The world is full of talented, driven musicians who are all trying to make a living at it, as much as they can. Everyone has access to YouTube videos, online lessons, and so on. But the ones who take lessons, go to university, get experience in professional or school-related bands (cover band, jazz) have a serious advantage over drummers who can't or won't, such as yourself. You cannot train yourself nearly as well as someone who attends lessons, gets experience in different bands, and accepts the "teacher-student" relationship with maturity. You obviously love playing drums - and that's very important - but so do lots of drummers.



No one can possibly know what you should study, because they haven't seen or heard you play in person. A video cannot tell you what you are doing wrong, and can't suggest an effective way to improve.

You should also realize that getting lessons, experience, a university degree -- none of this guarantees that you'll become a successful drummer. But it will at least improve your chances.




696/5000



Thanks for the tips! well what to say, you're right, you're telling me that basically i should take lessons and shut up: D or am i wrong? what do you mean when "i should accept teacher-student lessons in a mature way?" how you do it? does that mean that at the moment I'm not mature from a musical point of view?

However, you know, the factor that does not make me take lessons is what makes me think that I have been playing for many years now and the hypothetical teacher I would face would lead me to have a style like his at the expense of mine. Also I have no idea where to find a good one and schools cost ...

It is a difficult time for me because I am deciding what to do in life ...
 

danondrums

Well-known member
Get with a teacher. In person is best, but if it's important for you to have similar musical styles, Skype/Online lessons can be very helpful.

You mention that you worry a teacher would lead you to have a style like theirs... Two things on that.
- A teacher can't change how music makes you feel and what you feel is what comes out in your playing so I wouldn't worry about that.
- Or the other side of the coin, your teacher is making a living playing drums. You want to make a living playing drums. You will serve yourself by becoming more like your teacher than where you currently are.

It's all growth and those who make excuses that hinder their growth are wasting valuable time.

Best of luck on your journey!
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
you're telling me that basically i should take lessons and shut up
I didn't say it that way, but yes, learn to accept instruction, and trust that your teachers know more than you do. Learn what they have to offer, even if -- especially if -- it's in a different style. Styles and techniques other than metal may seem irrelevant to you now, but that will change.

a style like his at the expense of mine
You may think your personal style is great, but there is probably lots of room for improvement. Some young players tend to see their shortcomings as "style". When we're young, we often overestimate our own abilities.

If you learn new skills from your teachers, you will not "unlearn" anything. You will just add to what you already know. You NOT in danger of losing your own style -- you will sound like you, always. But, the best players in the world always continue to improve and, yes, take lessons. For example, Neil Peart and Steve Smith studied with Freddie Gruber, after they were already famous and successful in Rush and Journey.

All we see are drummers on big stages, or on YouTube showing off. We do not see the hours, weeks, and years spent in lessons, at a university or conservatory, learning another instrument, etc. We only see the performance, not the preparation.

It is a difficult time for me because I am deciding what to do in life
21 is a difficult age, for sure. It's a very good sign that you are seeking advice. My advice is: if you want to play professionally, treat your education like a professional.
 
You have two main avenues as a professional drummer: performing and teaching. Being able to do both is your best bet to make enough money.

Regarding performing: Milan is a big city, so you might be able to play with a good Metal band and make some money. But making enough money is uncertain - probably not enough concerts locally / long trips to concerts, bands breaking up etc. It might work out but you should have a Plan B.
So that could be performing music that people pay money for: Weddings, corporate parties and whatever is big in your city. That means you'll probably have to play Top 40 Pop songs, Funk and Soul, "Dinner" music and traditionals (Bossas, Piano Trios, Tangos, Tarantellas,...). Reading notes is also important because there might be few or no rehearsals with a band you don't know all that well.
So the more styles you learn now, the more adept you'll be at playing it later. It will also make you a better Metal drummer - think of versatile guys like Matt Garstka, Marco Minnemann or Morgan Agren.

To work as a teacher, you'll get students with all kinds of interests. To give them a solid foundation, you should also be good at reading notes and playing different styles.

So, I also recommend a teacher to brush up on what you've learned and to get an idea how to teach. I'm sure there are lots of great teachers in Milan but I don't know the city. You can book individual lessons if money is tight. Or get with online teachers: https://www.drummerworld.com/forums/index.php?threads/find-a-drum-teacher-here.54188/
If you want to focus mainly on technique, check out Bill Bachmann: https://www.drumworkout.com/

Best of luck!
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
There are many online resources. You'll have to do some research.

When it comes to teachers, it's ok to shop around. Try a lesson or two and if it doesn't feel right try someone else. I definetly meet young kids that need some attitude adjustment, but many teachers are also quite narrow both in their knowledge and teaching skills. It's like that in any field, really.

I at least suggest having an open mind and no matter what style you're into, try to learn at least the basics of all the popular styles needed for regular gigging, teaching etc... You might be surprised and find something new you enjoy.

There are also classics in reading, technique and independence that would serve you well to work a bit on, especially if you have enough time to work on that stuff.
 
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