HH Clutch Treads Rubbing On Cymbal

AzHeat

Platinum Member
This should be an age old question with a decent solution, but I haven’t heard much buzz over it. My last two HH clutches weren’t threaded in the middle section, so the top cymbal would never touch threads. The new Yamaha HH stand I got is threaded all the way through. How’s everyone preventing the threads from keyholing the top HH cymbal?

I see cymbal tilted sleeves, but not seeing anything for the clutch. Not sure what size the Yamaha clutch treads are either, but they seem narrow.
 
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Deleted member 525878

Guest
Apply a narrow strip of Gorilla Tape in the middle of the threads and inspect regularly.
 

Mongrel

Silver Member
Don’t worry about it...

Unless you are playing a pair of Istanbul Ks...wait...those are already key-holed by now...

You’ll be dead before it matters....
 
P

Peedy

Guest
That was the whole reason that drove me to the Gibraltar quick release clutch.

Pete
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
I set some heatshrink tubing over the middle of the thread. The felt washers can still get past while it protects the cymbal.
One of my New Beats was getting very slightly keyholed, almost in a square shape. This has fixed it.
 
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Deleted member 525878

Guest
Metal-to-metal contact is a no-no when it comes to cymbal holes and hi-hat clutches and stand tilters!
I always used tape in the middle of the threading. No more keyholing!
I have to try that heatshrink tubing. Thanks for the tip Morrisman!
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
Well, funny heat shrink should be mentioned. Just this afternoon, I cut off a section of heat shrink and put it over the threads. I then discovered the spent shell casing of a .45 Colt slips over the threads nicely, so I cut the primer end off and slipped that over the heat shrink. Being brass, it should keep it and the cymbal from wearing on each other and the heat shrink keeps everything in place. Bonus! I’m not sure if the trick will work with the larger diameter clutches, but for now I have a workable solution. When that casing wears out, I’ll find another.
 

OSDrums

Well-known member
Don’t worry about it...
...
You’ll be dead before it matters....
From my personal experience it does! Used one of these threaded clutches when I was younger and ruined my 2002 Hihat Top... it‘s still playable and sounds good as ever, but due to the enlarged hole it slides around on the bottom more then it should.
What I did once I knew the reason was to take a file and remove the threading in the middle of the clutch. The next Hihat stands or clutches I bought were without threads in that area and I would strongly recommend to only use such models to everyone! All kind of tapes at one point in time form a sticky mess so this for me would only be a very short term solution (e.g. if you have to use a clutch on a festival).
The pics below show what the thread did within 10 years to my top cymbal - the diameter on its widest section went from the normal 12.5 mm to 14.2 mm...
DSC_6744_002_800.jpgDSC_6742_000_800.jpgDSC_6743_001_800.jpg
 
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Alain Rieder

Silver Member
I think it is a real problem with Yamaha clutches. When I had my first Yamaha hi-hat, over 30 years ago, it only took a few months before I started noticing some damage.
I was practicing and playing a lot and I tried to prevent it to become worse. So I tried gaffer tape which didn't work too well, but it was clearly a little better.
I thought about heatshrink tubing, but I didn't try it as I thought it would be too thin.
I tried a thicker plastic tube instead, and it was ok but it tends to restrict the cymbal's movement a little too much.
I also used an old Pearl clutch that I have had for years.

I've been told that the latest Yamaha top of the line clutches have an unthreaded middle section, but I only have previous versions and didn't check the new ones in person. But even with the latest Yamaha model, you need a drum key to release the cymbal, so I bought a Remo Quick Lock clutch instead, as I thought it would be more practical for gigging, and I really like it so far.
 

Soulfinger

Senior Member
Apply a narrow strip of Gorilla Tape in the middle of the threads and inspect regularly.
This.
I did that on the Yamaha clutch I use once a week in our rehearsal room, and the tape holds up perfectly.

For the Yamaha stand I use every day I invested in a new non-threaded clutch - the Sonor 200 series is dirt cheap, is 6 mm like the Yamaha rod and works like a charm. If you are OCD about looks, you can replace the Sonor wing nut with the Yamaha, threads are identical. Don´t ask me how I know. :)

Bonus point: you´ll notice an immediate improvement in sound due to the top cymbal's vibrations not being restricted by the threads. I was genuinely surprised by the difference.
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
This.
I did that on the Yamaha clutch I use once a week in our rehearsal room, and the tape holds up perfectly.

For the Yamaha stand I use every day I invested in a new non-threaded clutch - the Sonor 200 series is dirt cheap, is 6 mm like the Yamaha rod and works like a charm. If you are OCD about looks, you can replace the Sonor wing nut with the Yamaha, threads are identical. Don´t ask me how I know. :)

Bonus point: you´ll notice an immediate improvement in sound due to the top cymbal's vibrations not being restricted by the threads. I was genuinely surprised by the difference.
Not as readily available here in the US, but definitely good to know.
 

Alain Rieder

Silver Member
Don’t worry about it...

Unless you are playing a pair of Istanbul Ks...wait...those are already key-holed by now...

You’ll be dead before it matters....
Yamaha clutch and K Zildjian top H-H cymbal.
This occurred over a period of just a few months, before I noticed and started to protect the cymbal.
No big deal though, the hi-hat is still 100% playable, but I wouldn't like this to become worse.
And yes I was playing and practicing a lot too at the time it occurred.

IMG_20200728_171954.JPG
 

NouveauCliche

Senior Member
Well, funny heat shrink should be mentioned. Just this afternoon, I cut off a section of heat shrink and put it over the threads. I then discovered the spent shell casing of a .45 Colt slips over the threads nicely, so I cut the primer end off and slipped that over the heat shrink. Being brass, it should keep it and the cymbal from wearing on each other and the heat shrink keeps everything in place. Bonus! I’m not sure if the trick will work with the larger diameter clutches, but for now I have a workable solution. When that casing wears out, I’ll find another.
That's some manly SH** too - a shell casing. 💪
 

gish

Senior Member
I’m all for ingenuity to solve dumb engineering issues, but in this case I’d sky hook that Yamaha clutch into the scrap bin and get the Gibraltar quick release. I think I paid all of $15 on Amazon, free shipping.
 

AzHeat

Platinum Member
I’m all for ingenuity to solve dumb engineering issues, but in this case I’d sky hook that Yamaha clutch into the scrap bin and get the Gibraltar quick release. I think I paid all of $15 on Amazon, free shipping.
They have them at my local GC. I just have to line up a time to go and have them be open without lines. Yup, could order on Amazon, but getting out is like a trip to Disney Land these days!
 
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