Help Preventing Burning In Feet/Legs While Playing Double Bass

Anyone have tips, maybe with bass drum head tension, footboard height/angle, beater height/weight/angle or type, and maybe spring tension that will help with the burning I experience in the lowest front portion of my legs while playing fast double bass or beats?? I usually play heavy metal, do a good amount of stretching and warming up b4 I play, and I doubt it is my technique but all advice is great!!!!
 

joeysnare

Silver Member
how long have you been playing for? you might just be building the strength in your legs you need to play double bass passages. your never gonna lose that burning feeling if you play for a long time or particularly fast, but you will learn to deal with the pain and push through it as the years pass. drums are a very physical pass time, no pain no gain.
 

720hours World Record

Senior Member
I've been playing for 7 years and have been getting into heavier and faster double bass/metal drumming.
Give this a try, make your spring tension HARDER (you mentioned that and I agree), I know it sounds weird.

You said "and maybe spring tension that will help with the burning I experience in the lowest front portion of my legs while playing fast double bass or beats" so I assume those muscles are doing too much work lifting your foot and lactic acid is building up.

Making the spring tension tighter can give the front shin muscles a rest from lifting the foot, of course it will be harder to push down.

Let me know if it works OR let me know if I am NUTS.

From S.A ... Contrary to popular opinion, lactate or, as it is often called, lactic acid buildup is not responsible for the muscle soreness felt in the days following strenuous exercise. Rather, the production of lactate and other metabolites during extreme exertion results in the burning sensation often felt in active muscles, though which exact metabolites are involved remains unclear. This often painful sensation also gets us to stop overworking the body, thus forcing a recovery period in which the body clears the lactate and other metabolites......
 

belairien

Silver Member
Ive played double bass for under a year, but after experimentation i found a higher spring tension works, as long as you let gravity do most of the downward force, and use the tension to assist your feet back up. it uses little energy and i play at db speeds equivalent to songs like "The Essential Salts" by Nile, usually in five to eight minute sections.

this is just my 2 bits though, it may not work for many people.

Also my beaters are five inches away from my heads, almost full tension, and almost at their max height with a loose head. and what motion i have is used in my ankles and calfs for the most part. using those muscles tend to help a lot of people.
 

JT1

Silver Member
Anyone have tips, maybe with bass drum head tension, footboard height/angle, beater height/weight/angle or type, and maybe spring tension that will help with the burning I experience in the lowest front portion of my legs while playing fast double bass or beats?? I usually play heavy metal, do a good amount of stretching and warming up b4 I play, and I doubt it is my technique but all advice is great!!!!
I used to suffer with this a lot but the thing is mate it happens when you start out on double bass, there is no cure other than learning to relax and to be comfortable when playing things that are particularly challenging. As the years go on it will decrease and eventually you won't feel any burning I know it's been a while since I have.

An important question – Do you play heel up or down?

I started playing heel down and felt the burn a lot however after about 2 years of playing I switched to heel up and I feel this really give me a head-start. If you've never played heel down it might be worth you trying for a while it might just surprise you when it comes to switching back to heel up.
 

belairien

Silver Member
In regards to my previous answer, if you are playing the double bass continuously, i suggest minimizing the amount of movement in your legs, to no more than twitches basically, with just your calfs and ankles. because this way you use less energy, and it will at least prolong the burn, and help with faster playing. Other than myself, i personally know someone who uses this technique, which is how i learned it.

i play A LOT of death, and black metal and it has helped me.

but all in all just practice with whats most comfortable for you.
 

Ekim

Silver Member
Don't forget to breathe. Oxygen is very important, especially when you're not getting any and your chest starts hurting because you're so focused on your feet.

(Don't ask how I know....)
 
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