Help needed please Pearl snare

John H jabconsl

New member
Firstly I apologise - I am not a drummer, and I am in Australia, and I am old (71, and an old guitarist / singer) and it's time to get rid of the gear I have kept for years. I used to record my own backing tracks back in the early 90's but was never happy with the sampled snares. and just liked the sound of this one.
I am trying to identify this Pearl snare. It was part of a drum kit (the rest long gone), I bought for one of my sons many years ago, but he did not continue on.
It looks like a COB 70's, but I suspect it may be Chrome over Steel. It has 2 ridges. It is 14 x 5 inch and has 10 lugs. It is in excellent condition I think
Any help appreciated from the experts.
Any idea of Value (if any) in $AUD?)
 

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Al Strange

Well-known member
I’m no expert but it looks like a mint condition 1970’s COS MIJ? Many believe this to be the Copeland snare (although popular opinion is that his was a COB). The COS go for about £180? Not sure what that is in AUD? There’s bound to be someone on here who will confirm for you. All the best. (y) :D
 

Ransan

Senior Member
Ive been studying Jupiter snares (for a good reason I’ll get into later) as that is next on my list. Here’s my assessment in USD (my apologies) would be a around $150-$200 USD.

The snare you have is COS specifically that’s a D4514. Looking at the vent hole position at bottom of the shell under badge was last used around ‘72, the 73’ model uses same badge but vent is directly under Pearl badge, maybe little more value as it’s first gen with Gladstone, and the lever head is intact 👍. Studying the snare, I also gather the rule of thumb for that series was 3 ridges, parallel snare mechanics, and linkage rod through inner shell, and it was the COB Jupiter, 2 ridges like yours and it’s the COS.
A very good snare; however most like to call these Jupiter’s 4814 or Copeland model as they look like but aren’t. (I’ve seen these steel models try to sell as high as $400, been on market for months).

As for inspection to see if it is brass or steel.
I normally look at inner shell.
If the interior of the shell has any burnished or brownish color that is indicative of a cob.
If it is smooth, shiny, and silver, it is steel.
If that is not visible- Pull out a magnet.

Good luck.
 
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Ransan

Senior Member
I’m no expert but it looks like a mint condition 1970’s COS MIJ? Many believe this to be the Copeland snare (although popular opinion is that his was a COB). The COS go for about £180? Not sure what that is in AUD? There’s bound to be someone on here who will confirm for you. All the best. (y) :D
Hi Al yes this is oft mistaken as the Copeland.
Not the Copeland he used the Jupiter.
This is not the Jupiter model.
 

Ransan

Senior Member
Cheers for that, top response, I suspected as much. I’m a Copeland nut, and would love to get hold of a COB Jupiter! Why are you studying them, it wasn’t clear from your post?:unsure:
Hi Al long story but I’ll try to shorten.
I want a sensitive snare I.e. super sensitive, but I hear nothing but bad things, being a Pearl fan I did some research and found what I think a holy grail of snares - the Jupiter, everyone seems to have and love or have loved them, and not the MIJ models that are loosely being termed as Jupiter.
I needed to be sure I was going to be looking for the right one.

I happen to stumble across the Copeland stigma but still not sure if his snare ‘of mysterious provenance’ is Pearl President 10 lug COB MIJ, or The actual Jupiter model but a lot of trails lead that way...

Here’s why I also needed to further hone in, I guess you could say the practice of my research became reality.
One day I went to a local pawn shop and saw a COB version of the snare the OP has but with the president throw off little under $350. I immediately thought upon inspection a Jupiter! I went back home and did research extensively. Come to find out they did make a 10 lug COB version of the 4514D steel model, which were made in late 60s using the pro throw off, which looks kind of like the a rolling lever (I.e. clock face) and first year or so of 70s. These are the ones I think are culprits of renown namesake. Still good snares and probably just as valuable, but not Jupiter
There was more to it than just being COB 10 lug the real Jupiter has beefed up look.
I know what to look for now, in the Jupiter snares, the systems look like early free floating snare systems.

I hope this answers your inquiry somewhat.

For the Op here’s another tidbit.
In the 72’ catalogue you can first see the Gladstone describing a “newly designed strainer for ultra fine adjustments.”


Reference: drum archive.com
 

Al Strange

Well-known member
Hi Al long story but I’ll try to shorten.
I want a sensitive snare I.e. super sensitive, but I hear nothing but bad things, being a Pearl fan I did some research and found what I think a holy grail of snares - the Jupiter, everyone seems to have and love or have loved them, and not the MIJ models that are loosely being termed as Jupiter.
I needed to be sure I was going to be looking for the right one.

I happen to stumble across the Copeland stigma but still not sure if his snare ‘of mysterious provenance’ is Pearl President 10 lug COB MIJ, or The actual Jupiter model but a lot of trails lead that way...

Here’s why I also needed to further hone in, I guess you could say the practice of my research became reality.
One day I went to a local pawn shop and saw a COB version of the snare the OP has but with the president throw off little under $350. I immediately thought upon inspection a Jupiter! I went back home and did research extensively. Come to find out they did make a 10 lug COB version of the 4514D steel model, which were made in late 60s using the pro throw off, which looks kind of like the a rolling lever (I.e. clock face) and first year or so of 70s. These are the ones I think are culprits of renown namesake. Still good snares and probably just as valuable, but not Jupiter
There was more to it than just being COB 10 lug the real Jupiter has beefed up look.
I know what to look for now, in the Jupiter snares, the systems look like early free floating snare systems.

I hope this answers your inquiry somewhat.

For the Op here’s another tidbit.
In the 72’ catalogue you can first see the Gladstone describing a “newly designed strainer for ultra fine adjustments.”


Reference: drum archive.com
Let us know if you find one, and obviously pics!!(y):)
 

Morrisman

Platinum Member
These seem to sell in Australia for around $300, which equates to the $US200 someone mentioned. A brass shell or a Jupiter in good condition goes for a bit more.
I thought the steel ones had a knurled centre bead, while brass had the parallel ridges, but I'm not an expert on these.
 

Ransan

Senior Member
These seem to sell in Australia for around $300, which equates to the $US200 someone mentioned. A brass shell or a Jupiter in good condition goes for a bit more.
I thought the steel ones had a knurled centre bead, while brass had the parallel ridges, but I'm not an expert on these.
Hi Morrisman

That is what I mean by 2 ridges with knurled center. Yes you are correct in your statement as being COS.
 

John H jabconsl

New member
I am grateful for all the replies. Thank-you so much. I confirmed with a magnet it is steel. I was also interested in the history
Regards to all
John H
 

Ransan

Senior Member
Looks like a Pearl 810 model.
Introduced in early 70s and used for most of decade.

Those are about $50-$100 maybe $125 USD, vintage pedals in general are roughly in this range as most players go with current or are highly suspect of mechanical hardware.

Good luck
 

John H jabconsl

New member
Looks like a Pearl 810 model.
Introduced in early 70s and used for most of decade.

Those are about $50-$100 maybe $125 USD, vintage pedals in general are roughly in this range as most players go with current or are highly suspect of mechanical hardware.

Good luck
Thankyou
 

TJK

Well-known member
Damn that’s some radical cam and pedal angle, have to try the yellow cam with half the strap cut off on my eliminator.
 
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