Help me write a book!

Cleforo

Senior Member
Hi!

I'm writing a instructional/method book about drumming, obviously.
I have quite a lot of ideas, but I'd like to know what you think should be included in it!
You could say something like:

"I think drum books should include specific Steve Gadd things, because he is awesome!"

You can say that, even though I'd like you to go more in depth.

If there are some really good ones, I'll be more than happy to include your name in the book. I'm not guaranteeing that the book will be great, but I hope my fellow drummers could help improving it a notch.

Thank you!
/Clef
 

oops

Silver Member
I'd suggest you find one particular topic for the book to be about.

The top notch instructional materials out there (DVDs, books etc) are all particularly focused and indepth. A lot of time is spent reviewing the material covered and presenting the info in easy and understandable language/format.

Some materials the spring to mind: Art of Bop (great layout, simple text, awesome ideas, pictures etc.), Steve Smith's Drum Legacy DVD (great idea, well presented, very well filmed, contains lots of additional info).

There's not going to be any use in bringing out a book, unless you have a specific area of expertise.

Is there anything particular that you're good at? It's all well and good having suggestions, but unless you've spent a good amount of time mastering Steve Gadd's ideas there's no point in trying to bring out a book about them.
 

Cleforo

Senior Member
Well, I'm a Latin/Jazz Fusion drummer, and been studying/playing those the past years. I don't know about making a DVD and stuff, since I most likely will only be selling the book to my students and local drummers. A play along CD wouldn't be to bad though.
Thank you oops for replying so fast :)

/Clef
 

mrchattr

Gold Member
The only reason to write a book is if you have something to say on a specific subject. If you are a Latin drummer, and have a unique take on Latin drumming, or how to learn Latin drumming, or unique exercies to help people with Latin drumming, then write a book to accomplish that goal. If you have to ask what to write about, you probably aren't ready to write a book.

I don't mean to sound rude. My point is more that I could kick out a book of basic syncopation stuff in a week flat...but it would be similar to what Ted Reed did back in the day, so instead I just have students use that. Now, I have lately been exploring some really neat hi hat techniques that I have never really seen anyone use. If those explorations continue to work, then maybe I will eventually write something about that, since it is unique and would benefit the community beyond what is already out there (to my knowledge).
 

jeffwj

Platinum Member
The only reason to write a book is if you have something to say on a specific subject. If you are a Latin drummer, and have a unique take on Latin drumming, or how to learn Latin drumming, or unique exercies to help people with Latin drumming, then write a book to accomplish that goal. If you have to ask what to write about, you probably aren't ready to write a book.

I don't mean to sound rude. My point is more that I could kick out a book of basic syncopation stuff in a week flat...but it would be similar to what Ted Reed did back in the day, so instead I just have students use that. Now, I have lately been exploring some really neat hi hat techniques that I have never really seen anyone use. If those explorations continue to work, then maybe I will eventually write something about that, since it is unique and would benefit the community beyond what is already out there (to my knowledge).
I'm sorry, but I have to agree with mrchattr. I have a book that I have written that I am currently shopping to publishers. It took a few years of research, writing, rewriting, and sending it out for opinions. Not to mention the money spent on photography and artwork. I could not see putting all that work in on something if I did not "have something to say" as chattr put it.

Someone may think that a book is in need of bebop licks. But if jazz is not your specialty, then why incorporate it into the book? Someone asked if it will be used by your students. That is a good question and a good direction to go. What you tell your students and how you explain things to them should give you a good starting point. If you have a way of teaching something that is different from others' appoaches, try putting that down on paper. It will be more of you after it is written.
 

Cleforo

Senior Member
As a reply to all that:

This book will mostly be an exercise for future writing, and something I can use with my students.
But yes, I understand that I should specify it on something, however; what I want to do right now is like a basic book about drumming, probably quite rock/pop oriented. If there is something special you would have wanted to learn as a beginning drummer, please share it with me.
 

brady

Platinum Member
As a reply to all that:

This book will mostly be an exercise for future writing, and something I can use with my students.
But yes, I understand that I should specify it on something, however; what I want to do right now is like a basic book about drumming, probably quite rock/pop oriented. If there is something special you would have wanted to learn as a beginning drummer, please share it with me.

I would say, regardless of genre, the book should include some tips that may not seem obvious unless the reader has already has a teacher. Stuff like: When learning a new lick, play it slowly...VERY SLOWLY; Practice to a metronome; Listen - to yourself and others when you play. I'm sure there are many more, I just can't think of any right now. Oh yeah, never bash Ringo. :)
 
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