HELP ME RE-DESIGN THE IDEA OF A DRUMSET

Mustion

Senior Member
Drums only need redesign to solve problems customers will pay for. So what are those? Cost, weight, setup time required, space required to store/ship them? ? ? ?
And those things tend to come with some sort of trade-off. For example, I bought a set of all single-headed drums to make storage and transport easier--and they did! Thing is, they still sound like concert toms.

Anyway, the issue I have is with the idea that drums are in "desperate need" of redesign. No they aren't. In fact, drums are redesigned all the time by the individual player. They're the most easily customized instrument there is. Want a minimalist kit? Kick, drum, snare. Want to showboat? Octaplus, two dozen cymbals, two gongs. You get the idea.
 

danondrums

Well-known member
I filled-out the survey, but like almost every survey I've seen, it doesn't ask enough of the right questions, and is limited and incomplete on the choices available. I can't imagine what kind of useful information the author will get from it.

Bermuda
Same here. We're basically just helping a random person check the boxes for their senior design project. "conduct an online survey." Check...
Senior projects in college seemed more like an interruption to my drinking schedule than anything else (not that I'm saying it's a good thing) when I think about them so glad to help the cause. :)
 

Hollywood Jim

Platinum Member
Maverick. Don’t listen to any of these old fuddy duddys. You redesign the drum set. I think it’s a great idea. You might just come up with a great idea or two. Go for it !

.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Okay I'll play. Make my snare drum "smart". I want my snare hits to be converted into electricity somehow so I can charge my phone with it. I want it to "remember" my preferred tuning and snare settings. Oh yeah, the head doubles as a screen so I can see sheet music, videos, and DW. A built in metronome wouldn't hurt. Now it needs a headphone jack. Any more and you will be building a playable phone.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Here take my design for the swivel cam see-saw drum pedal (that I came up when I lost my marbles about a year ago with hernia crap) it strokes down both the down stroke and upstroke of foot pedal. The swivel on the cam can only go one direction so you push pedal down-swivel in cam engages the pedal which is on a separate pivot. pushes pedal down, then after strike the swivel disengages and pedal springs back for another strike. Then the swivel pivots in the cam so on the upstroke it engages pedal again pushing the pedal down again on the upstroke. The pedal is pulled back by a spring so the swivel in cam pivot is what always pushes it down-no matter upstroke or down stroke. It's a completely useless idea, that's probably really clanky, and would ca-chunk along like a train, but that was all the more reason I wanted to do it. Oh yeah the little red ball is the swivel in the cam that engages the bar of pedal pivot-it engages and disengages the pedal.The foot pedal bar has the swivel on end in the cam that contains the pedal pivot arms.
 

Attachments

Last edited:

KamaK

Platinum Member
If the OP is going for engineering architecture, I'd recommend looking into Andy and Josh's work and continuing it.

If the OP is going for engineering CS or EE, I'd take a look at what Yamaha is doing with their eKits and EAD10 and continuing it.
 

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
Good luck! I’m never one to think we’re at the peak of anything design wise so good luck!
Carbon fiber hardware might be nice and light and also isolate tone better than metal does. I’d be down with some carbon fiber stands. :)
Carbon fiber hardware would be great, until you see the price! :LOL:
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
A self assembling carbon nanotube drum kit or graphene so super thin shells with no need for reenforcement rings LOL After redefining the drum kit you can redesign the drummer. I'll help we will use CRISPR-cas to genetically modify drummers to be better-stronger, faster reflexes, better timing, better than AI LOL I hope you have a Laboratory? How do you think I got to play like I do-a diabolical experiment gone awry. There's always casualties in progress.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Well bugs are geniuses of design-so a drum kit with bass as abdomen-toms look like bug eyes-cymbals like wings, the drummer starts like a fat maggot, that soon forms a cocoon, then inally burst forth a butterfly for the solo. It will be art, music, nature, all rolled up into one. Oh yeah the cocoon can be in bass so when exiting it will deflate like a Dali drum.
 

wildbill

Platinum Member
The Trixons are actually quite a brilliant design. That base drum is actually a double bass drum for those that don’t know. You can slightly see a line crossing the head through the letter “O”. That line is from a board that divides the drum in half and the two different sides give two different pitches. Not shown is the bracket on the base drum behind the tom mount. A snare hookup goes there so there is no snare stand touching the floor. Then you add a pair of conventional bass drum pedals. Coolest looking set ever!
I'd imagine the patents expired long ago, so sure, he probably could run with something like that.

They're not for me though.
 

Michaelj

Member
I'd watch some of Harry Miree's youtube videos. Inspired by Carter Beauford's left hand lead, he set about trying to achieve a similar open-handed concept. His setup includes things like remote pedals with the hi hat on the right hand side, so he doesn't have to cross over his hands.

I don't agree that the drum set has been perfected - it's just what people learn on and get used to. Don't get me wrong - I think it's fine as-is, and I'm certainly not going to go about trying to re-learn on a new design, but there's plenty of scope for experimentation for those who are inclined to.
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Well I experimented with open handed by using my left snare hand to play hats and right hat hand to play snare. I can do it some but it's awkward. Then I thought about it "open handed drumming is a way of setting up and playing your drum set so that one hand doesn't cross over the other while playing the time-keeping cymbals (like the hi-hats, or ride"). So if I just moved my hat to the other side remotely (with pedal still on left) then you can comfortably play right hand on hats as usual and left on snare without crossing hands. It is open handed technically LOL. Yeah I'm a scoundrel figuring ways to cheat-like Captain James T. Kirk-my hero. When did Miree-do this-the poser probably stole the idea from me. Jinx.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
$10 says this guy won't even come back to the forum except to post another question/survey.

BTW, it only takes me about 15 min to set up (lowest time option was 30 min) and about 10 to tear down (the lowest time answer was 15 min).

I don't think the drum set needs a total overhaul in design. New accessories are cool and whatnot, but a "desperate need of redesign" is absurd. Feel free to prove me wrong Maverick.

Oh, I forgot...he will never see this because he's not coming back. Feel free to prove me wrong on that too.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
One thing that puzzles me is how they can make an electronic piano that sounds so close to the real thing with variable touch dynamics, sustain pedal, mute pedal, but a drum sound is so much harder to pull off. They are both percussion instruments. What is the big deal?

Also, design E-cymbals so they are thin and flop around lol. And put rims on the E drums. And leave some space under much thinner heads so they feel like drums. I really don't see how you can improve acoustic drums. It's like trying to build a better mousetrap or re-inventing the wheel. E drums have room for worlds of improvement though.
 
Last edited:

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
Hot dang it all my ideas are being stolen-maybe I should hide them. So I'm "jumping" the competition with my latest creation-The Shoe Pedal. I know no one will steal this idea-since it's top secret. I just play the single beater version but I wanted to show it's also a double.
 

Attachments

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
$10 says this guy won't even come back to the forum except to post another question/survey.

BTW, it only takes me about 15 min to set up (lowest time option was 30 min) and about 10 to tear down (the lowest time answer was 15 min).

I don't think the drum set needs a total overhaul in design. New accessories are cool and whatnot, but a "desperate need of redesign" is absurd. Feel free to prove me wrong Maverick.

Oh, I forgot...he will never see this because he's not coming back. Feel free to prove me wrong on that too.
Well that would really piss me off-especially since we've offered to help. We get these poor questionnaires all the time-I should be suspect. I didn't fill out the questionnaire and glad I didn't. He's failure to participate since he posted prompts little participation. I appreciate that we do make students check off the boxes but that isn't what's it's suppose to be. But you can only take a horse to water. I don't want DW to be known as an easy out for lazy students check list and some bullcrap questionnaires with little thought, intent, or any measurable outcomes.
 

Rattlin' Bones

Gold Member
It's not so much Redesign the idea of a drum set as it is replace the acoustic drum set.

Take buggy whips as an example. Horses were replaced as a means of transportation by trains, cars, and planes. The personal car became the daily mode of transportation, replacing your horse. So, they stopped re-designing buggy whips because they became obsolete and of no use if ya ain't got no horse hitched to a buggy and, instead, you're driving in your car to go visit your family on Thanksgiving.

Same with acoustic drums: in 100 years the'll have been replaced completely by electronic substitutes. My grandchildren's children are going to use an electronic substitute they'll have no tolerance for big heavy drums made of wood that require maintenance, new heads, cases, space in car to lug around to gigs. Just like pianos: the acoustic piano is being replaced. Used to be every keys player showed up at a gig and played the house piano. Same at studios. Now - how many venues still have a piano? Not many. The keys player brings their own instrument they plug into amps and PA's. No such thing in 1947. Acoustic drums as we know them today will slide down that same slope.
 
Top