Help! Drum descriptives and adjectives

Mikedrums78

Senior Member
I had a builder tell me today that a drum ply shell layup vs another style would produce a rounder note.

What does "a rounder note" or a "rounder sound" mean? Does it mean tubby or thumpy? If you had to describe it in more definitive terms, like lows, mids, highs, how would this type of shell sound?
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
I had a builder tell me today that a drum ply shell layup vs another style would produce a rounder note.

What does "a rounder note" or a "rounder sound" mean? Does it mean tubby or thumpy? If you had to describe it in more definitive terms, like lows, mids, highs, how would this type of shell sound?
Mostly lows and mids, with very little attack.
 
T

The SunDog

Guest
I had a builder tell me today that a drum ply shell layup vs another style would produce a rounder note.

What does "a rounder note" or a "rounder sound" mean? Does it mean tubby or thumpy? If you had to describe it in more definitive terms, like lows, mids, highs, how would this type of shell sound?
What does "tubby" or "thumpy" mean. Drummers do this all the time. Round, deep, full, tubby, thumps, woody, vintage, full, toney, fat, etc, etc. These are all vague terms that can be interpreted different ways by different people. You'll see this type a lot "I want a snare that's fat, with a lot of tone, and good crack but very sensitive" (that's an actual description from a post here).
 

JustJames

Platinum Member
Drums should have a tone that is slightly impudent, but never cheeky, with a great deal of sincerity while maintaining a sense of humility and respect.

In other news, drums go doomp and cymbals go pish.
 

Mikedrums78

Senior Member
What does "tubby" or "thumpy" mean. Drummers do this all the time. Round, deep, full, tubby, thumps, woody, vintage, full, toney, fat, etc, etc. These are all vague terms that can be interpreted different ways by different people. You'll see this type a lot "I want a snare that's fat, with a lot of tone, and good crack but very sensitive" (that's an actual description from a post here).
You got me on the tubby part, but then again I did also ask in terms of lows mids and highs. ;P
 
D

drumming sort of person

Guest
I would interpret "round" as meaning even frequency characteristics with no frequency being overly prominent. I prefer being specific with descriptions though. It would be more helpful to say that the drum would have more or less high frequency energy or predominant low mids etc.
 

PHIL2016

Senior Member
I often refer ''Tubby" as the thick, fat, compressed sound that Steve Gadd used in the Aja sessions and the sound Jeff Porcaro had when he recorded Rosanna, its also a sound common in recordings from the 70s and 80s...my $0.02
 

TheElectricCompany

Senior Member
I had a builder tell me today that a drum ply shell layup vs another style would produce a rounder note.

What does "a rounder note" or a "rounder sound" mean? Does it mean tubby or thumpy? If you had to describe it in more definitive terms, like lows, mids, highs, how would this type of shell sound?
Some examples... Nick Mason's drums on Animals are round. Ringo's drums on Abbey Road are a full bodied thump. Mitch Mitchell's drums on Are You Experienced? are wide open. Bonham's drums on In Through the Out Door are fat.
 
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