Help A jazzyNoob

Mavela215

New member
Hey guys
Im a sr in high school
I made this account for this post.
I play in a jazz combo, (cocktail and corporate style) I also play in jazz band different pit orchestras for my and other schools
Lots of LIGHTLIGHT swing and latin, quiet and practical.
I told myself as I've upgraded from my metal Grestch energy 22” to my new Ludwig breakbeats, I didnt go for the more expensive catalina club because I wanted to have more money to spend on cymbals. (Im glad I went with the Ludwig)
My dillema regards my cymbal choice.
Dream Contact 22”
Medium thin A 18” 70s
New Beats 14” 60s
This is too bright yes?
Id like to upgrade.
Is it worth it? Or can I survive on the not jazz cymbals?
what are some recommendations if I like to buy mainly used?
what should I buy/replace first? or do u think i can sell the set and put the money into new things.
Shall I trade things or can somethings transition as i start to bring new cymbals in?
PS: RIGHT NOW I can put like like to put up to 300 into the upgrade (hopefully no more than 500 tho, but that means ill be next to broke) meaning the value of my current cymbals so feel free to say i should wait a little more
but like i said, being in highschool and all im really proud ive been able to finance my drum habit all by myself so it takes a little for me to get this much dough.
Aka pls dont judge my cheap choices. I just wanna be a crusty jazzcat when I grow up
Thank you for reading my novel
Miguel
 

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
I don't see anything wrong with your cymbals. I've played tons of jazz combo gigs with New Beats and other A Zildjians. Playing quietly takes practice, and is a great skill to have!

That Dream Contact 22" seems like a fairly dark cymbal, which is pretty jazzy if you asked me.

I guess whichever cymbal is the most difficult to play quietly on should be replaced first? But your cymbals aren't that bad TBH, it could be way worse!

Btw, I have a Dream Bliss 19" Paper Thin crash that's amazing for quiet gigs. And my main hi-hats right now are a set of Dream Bliss 14" hats. They're very jazzy.
 
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Winston_Wolf

Platinum Member
I think the cymbals all seem like good choices for jazz. I used to own a Dream Contact 22", and while it wasn't as thin and dark as the Dream Bliss rides I had, it was still a cymbal I would use for jazz combo without thinking twice. All of my high school and college jazz playing was done with New Beat hihats, and an 18" medium thin crash is a really versatile cymbal too. I think you're off to a good start.

What you may want is to try out some maple sticks. They help get a lighter sound out of your cymbals and drums so it's easier to control your dynamics. You may also want to switch out the heads on the drums for something a little warmer like Remo Renaissance or Aquarian Modern Vintage.
 
So you already play with those bands, right? Is there something you don't like about one of your cymbals? Maybe you can make them work (sticks, tape, technique..?) but if you want to try something different after all and are not completely sure, used is the way to go. You can get some excellent cymbals for $50 to $150 if you're patient and willing to also re-sell the occassional cymbal that you don't like.
 

Mavela215

New member
Thank you for the incredible replies, I feel alot better now, I was just scared because it seems like the way to go with my style is ks or Bosporus and i was concerned i spent my money on the wrong thing.
Thanks guys!
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
That's a really good all purpose first set up actually-- except maybe the Dream-- a lot of them are weird. At least it's probably an OK combo cymbal. Lots of jazz musicians have used A. Zildjians.

At least for training purposes, I would actually get a similar vintage 20" A. med ride, and learn how to play your As. That would be basically the world's most normal cymbal set up. That will give you a baseline for judging other cymbals, and for your cymbal technique. And you can use them on every gig you'll ever do. That 70s 20" medium ride will cost you about $120 used.
 

Peedy

Senior Member
Lots of jazz musicians have used A. Zildjians.
spot on. And to the OP, remember that before the 1970s, “A Zildjian” was the whole brand and not a line of cymbals. A Zildjians from the 30s - 50s were played by most of the great jazz drummers and are still highly prized by jazz players today.

What you have now is tons better than where I started so go slow and find the sounds that fit who you are.

Pete
 

danondrums

Well-known member
I noticed the other night that Peter Erskine plays a lot of A’s. I believe one ride was an A and the other an A Custom. If that dude is playing A’s, then everyone with K’s might be wrong. :) Just a joke of course, but Erskine has great cymbal sounds.
 

gdmoore28

Gold Member
Your current cymbals are just fine for what you are doing. Honestly, if you could afford to drop a couple of thousand dollars and equip your set with those magical, dark, jazzy cymbals that everybody raves about (and they are luscious, but . . .), only you would notice. The audience does not care. As long as your playing is solid, the audience is happy as can be.

GeeDeeEmm
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Absolutely !!!

Buddy Rich, Louie Bellson, Joe Morello are 3 that immediately come to mind

honestly probably as many A players as K
I read somewhere Buddy was using a 20” A Light Ride, so I got one and I tell you I was pleasantly surprised. It’s thin enough that it sounds great as a crash, and being a little thinner, it’s not this cutting ride ping sound. A very good tool. I found another cymbal that works well alone.
 

Push pull stroke

Platinum Member
A lot of succeeding at quiet gigs is stick choice, I notice. Vic Firth Bolero or (for REALLY quiet gigs) Vic Firth Echo sticks can really make it easier to play quietly enough to keep the paying customer happy. Getting good at brush work can help too, for those gigs where even the Echo sticks are too loud.
 

Peedy

Senior Member
I read somewhere Buddy was using a 20” A Light Ride, so I got one and I tell you I was pleasantly surprised. It’s thin enough that it sounds great as a crash, and being a little thinner, it’s not this cutting ride ping sound. A very good tool. I found another cymbal that works well alone.

Yeah, I've tried doing that with some drum heroes myself. The problem with most of them is that they were moving targets. When you look at the 1958 and 1976 Artist promotionals, they tend to change as times and their needs change. Buddy Rich wasn't an exception.

To the OP, I should have mentioned that while you can save some money going vintage, the really good stuff can be just as expensive as new K Sweets or similar. And a few are way more. What it really comes down to is the kind of sound you're looking for. The day will come when you play some mentors jazz age cymbals and your eyes will be open to a whole new universe of possibilities. It's not that they're better or worse sounding, it's that some of them are really different sounding.

Pete


Buddy Rich 1958.jpgBuddy Rich 1976.jpg
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Yeah, I've tried doing that with some drum heroes myself. The problem with most of them is that they were moving targets. When you look at the 1958 and 1976 Artist promotionals, they tend to change as times and their needs change. Buddy Rich wasn't an exception.

To the OP, I should have mentioned that while you can save some money going vintage, the really good stuff can be just as expensive as new K Sweets or similar. And a few are way more. What it really comes down to is the kind of sound you're looking for. The day will come when you play some mentors jazz age cymbals and your eyes will be open to a whole new universe of possibilities. It's not that they're better or worse sounding, it's that some of them are really different sounding.

Pete


View attachment 89835View attachment 89836
So true. Up to a certain point in my life I was convinced rides had to be heavy to give ping, so I was intrigued to see Buddy using a Light ride, and did the subsequent investigation. It’s funny because a lot of my friends are still thinking rides must be heavy and pingy and refuse to use my
light ride when if I suggest they try it. Oh well.
 
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