heel toe

jamesm049

New member
when playing heel to toe do you play it as a roll or ruff? pretty much everyone calls it a roll but when you look at what their playing its a rlrl pattern.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
It depends. At the kit, I'm doing rrll (h/t, h/t). The leg motion doesnt change once doubles are applied, just how the foot acts. It's the same as doing doubles with the hands.

Sitting on the couch with feet on the floor, I've done rlrl (t/t, h/h) since before I even had a second pedal to do doubles on. Been doing it like that so long it's easier (without pedals) than h/t.
 

jamesm049

New member
thanks for the reply that's interesting, i've been playing lrlr but i've been wondering if playing it as a roll would improve my speed. So far when i play it as a roll i cant get it above around 160bpm.

how do you do for speed playing it as roll? what bpm are you playing at?
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
thanks for the reply that's interesting, i've been playing lrlr but i've been wondering if playing it as a roll would improve my speed. So far when i play it as a roll i cant get it above around 160bpm.

how do you do for speed playing it as roll? what bpm are you playing at?
Honestly I dont know. I use a click just for evenness anymore. I stopped worrying about the tempo a long time ago.

I play most everything using singles. Heel/toe gets used sparingly. I learned heel/toe a couple years ago, been doing singles since 93. It just feels more natural for me.

Dont know if it helps, I can run singles 16ths at 200bpm with my feet. Theoretically I should be able to do heel/toe at that speed also with enough practice.

I'll put a click to it later and see what I get, and I'll compare it to doing singles.
 

bud7h4

Silver Member
From what I understand, heel toe applied as RLRL (heel-heel-toe-toe) is done using "constant release". While a few people are incredible at this technique, the advantage of playing heel toe as RRLL (heel-toe-heel-toe) is the ability to play complex patterns which would otherwise be near impossible playing RLRL.

Constant release is easier to play evenly (volume) , while RRLL tends to sound louder on the downstrokes than the rebound until you get really good at it.
Heel toe played RRLL probably facilitates higher speed.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Okay, I can comfortably do heel/toe at 125, so that puts the 16ths at 250. I'm not really trying to go any faster at this point with heel/toe. I dont gig anymore so it's all just for my own satisfaction.
 

wildbill

Platinum Member
From what I understand, heel toe applied as RLRL (heel-heel-toe-toe) is done using "constant release". While a few people are incredible at this technique, the advantage of playing heel toe as RRLL (heel-toe-heel-toe) is the ability to play complex patterns which would otherwise be near impossible playing RLRL.

Constant release is easier to play evenly (volume) , while RRLL tends to sound louder on the downstrokes than the rebound until you get really good at it.
Heel toe played RRLL probably facilitates higher speed.
Yes - the terminology is not set yet, and everyone seems to play and define it differently.

When I do heel/toe, I actually use both my heels and my toes on the foot boards in a roll pattern - RRLL.
Heel/toe for me is a 'walking motion', and I never walk right heel/left heel/right toe/left toe.
I always walk normally. :p

I also do constant release. which I think of as a fulcrum or a see-saw motion. The ball of my foot is the pivot point.
Although my heels and toes do go up and down, they aren't really doing the work because the ball of both feet never leaves the pedals.
The work is done by the up and down motion of my legs, and I use an interleaved RLRL pattern.
YMMV
 
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