Heel Spurs/Plantar Fasciitis?

Chollyred

Senior Member
Anyone have issues with this type of foot pain? A couple of months ago, I went up a ladder to the roof of our warehouse with contractors that were bidding on re-roofing the building. Within a day or two later, I started having severe foot pain. I figured I'd just strained something climbing the ladder, and that it would get better. Nope! Continued to get worse.

Went to the podiatrist and he diagnosed Heel Spurs and Plantar Fasciitis. He gave me cortisone shots in both heels and tried to talk me into $1000 custom shoe inserts. (I found custom inserts online for <$200). The cortisone shots feel like they're sticking a 16 penny nail through your foot! It hurt so bad that I stopped playing in our worship band.

It took a couple of weeks, but eventually started feeling better; enough that I started playing again. Now the pain is returning. I'm fearing that this could be a career ending injury/condition. If I can help it, I do not want to go through the cortisone shots again. There's also the fear that repeated shots cause the tendon to rupture.

If anyone has gone through this, what did you do? Or, how do you handle it? I've been playing for over 50 years and not ready to give up!
 

cornelius

Silver Member
I had Plantar Fasciitis - it was pretty uncomfortable... What worked for me was rolling a Lacrosse ball under my foot before going to bed each night and while getting out of bed each morning. Do your whole foot, and focus on your heel - do both feet.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Some good shoes, like Asics or NewBalance make a world of difference too, if you are on your feet all day. I don't know what you wear, but they could be hurting your feet.
 

Chollyred

Senior Member
Some good shoes, like Asics or NewBalance make a world of difference too, if you are on your feet all day. I don't know what you wear, but they could be hurting your feet.
Was wearing Skechers when I hurt them. Then went out and bought 3 different pair of New Balance. Shoes were approved by podiatrist. Wearing the custom inserts every day.

Have tried all of the exercises, but so far, nothing has helped. :(
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I have it too.

I fixed it by changing my diet. The pain was so intense, I looked up exactly what I'm supposed to eat to fight it. I can't remember exactly what I ate, but I remember it included cherries and celery (I ate it with peanut butter). I hate like this for several days, probably almost a week. I'm assuming that Googling will yield good results.

I'm also on anti-inflammatory supplements as well.

Best of luck!
 

David Hunter

Junior Member
I had it bad about 10 years ago. Both heels. As a teacher, I was on my feet (on tiled cement floors) for hours a day. I'm still not sure what I did to set it off, but it appeared literally overnight after a long day of teaching. Work soon became agony. Like you said, it felt like somebody was hammering a hot nail right into both heels. Getting out of bed in the morning was the worst. The shots only helped for a short time, and they were damn near as painful as the Plantar Fasciitis itself. I struggled through the rest of that school year, avoiding standing as much as possible. But what saved me was having that summer off. I tried to stay off my feet, and the tendons were slowly able to heal on their own. By the fall, I was 90% cured. Soon after, it was gone altogether.

I realize that most aren't fortunate enough to take 2 months off, but I can attest that if you can stay off your feet, they will heal on their own.

Good luck to you.
 

purist

Junior Member
I had Plantar Fasciitis - it was pretty uncomfortable... What worked for me was rolling a Lacrosse ball under my foot before going to bed each night and while getting out of bed each morning. Do your whole foot, and focus on your heel - do both feet.
I had the same experience, but used a tennis ball. I also switched to more supportive/cushioning running shoes. The pain went away.

I have no experience with heel spurs.
 

No Way Jose

Silver Member
I reduced my intake of calcium. Stopped drinking milk. The bone growths almost completely disappeared after about a month.
 

harryconway

Platinum Member
I just had a run in with Plantar Fasciitis. Changed out my daily wear shoes to Fila's. Put some Dr. Shoals Plantar Fasciitis inserts into my work boots. Stopped wearing all my cheap shoes. Took about 6 months before I completely healed up.​
 

8Mile

Platinum Member
I had this last summer. I play a lot of disc golf, which has me walking on uneven surfaces for long periods of time, and I think this was likely what caused the flareup for me.

I did see my doctor, but we didn't go right to cortisone shots. Instead, I was given some exercises to try with my foot and the suggestion to try an orthopedic insert. When I put the inserts in my shoes (the cheap Dr. Scholl's kind you can buy at the drugstore), I didn't get relief right away, but the problem went away over a period of a couple months.

I haven't had the problem come back since, even though I've stopped wearing the inserts. I did start a different exercise and diet routine around the same time, so that may have helped prevent a recurrence.
 

Ang

Member
Podiatrist didn’t help me at all, the cortisone shot worked for a week then it became even worse. I found a sports focused PT guy that really helped me.

STRETCH, STRETCH, STRETCH. Feet ankles and calves, and roll your calves on a foam roller, in a few weeks you’ll be good. I believe that the podiatrists are seriously behind the times on this problem.

When it flares up occasionally, which it will, do the stretches and roll on that foam again.
Good Luck.
 

Ruok

Silver Member
I hope some of these suggestions help you Chollyred. My problem is Morton's Neuroma in both feet. It is inflammation in the ball of both feet that feels like I'm walking on stones, and there is also numbness in the toes. I refuse to get a shot. All I do is ice the feet everyday. I've tried various ointments too, but none have helped. I've had this condition for more than 3 years now. It hasn't hindered playing the drums thankfully. It's worse when standing. So sitting at the kit and playing loosely tensioned pedals is tolerable.
 

steadypocket

Gold Member
My chiropractor would manipulate locked joints in the arches of both feet which were the cause of my intense heel pain. He also advocated regular stretching, both hammies and calves, but not the usual heel up stretches for calves. Heel down isolates a different part of your calves. Treatment helped but didn't eliminate the pain. Had the pain come and go in both feet. Eventually went away after the better part of a year.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I hope some of these suggestions help you Chollyred. My problem is Morton's Neuroma in both feet. It is inflammation in the ball of both feet that feels like I'm walking on stones, and there is also numbness in the toes. I refuse to get a shot. All I do is ice the feet everyday. I've tried various ointments too, but none have helped. I've had this condition for more than 3 years now. It hasn't hindered playing the drums thankfully. It's worse when standing. So sitting at the kit and playing loosely tensioned pedals is tolerable.
I also have occasional numbness in the toes, and as well I have soreness/pain in the ball of both feet, right where the toe connects to the foot at the joint; feels like I bruised it or something... comes and goes... Did you get a diagnosis, or just take a guess yourself based on symptoms?
 

Ruok

Silver Member
I also have occasional numbness in the toes, and as well I have soreness/pain in the ball of both feet, right where the toe connects to the foot at the joint; feels like I bruised it or something... comes and goes... Did you get a diagnosis, or just take a guess yourself based on symptoms?
I did get the diagnosis from a podiatrist. But I had researched my symptoms previously and knew that Morton's Neuroma was probably what I had. First I thought I had a rock in one shoe and realized that I didn't. Then a few months later, I thought my sock was bunched up on my other foot and it wasn't. Then my toes started to become numb. So I did see the doctor and got the diagnosis after several months of suffering with it.
 

Dr_Watso

Platinum Member
I did get the diagnosis from a podiatrist. But I had researched my symptoms previously and knew that Morton's Neuroma was probably what I had. First I thought I had a rock in one shoe and realized that I didn't. Then a few months later, I thought my sock was bunched up on my other foot and it wasn't. Then my toes started to become numb. So I did see the doctor and got the diagnosis after several months of suffering with it.
Thanks again, I've looked it up but it seems everyone has a different opinion about it. For you personally what treatments did you attempt or what worked?

I've also come to the conclusion unfortunately that I've done it to myself with drumming. I really bounce my foot pretty hard without noticing it and I guess I need to stop doing so which will be a very tough habit to break. I've already started investing in footwear that has more padding and that does seem to help. Working in an office environment makes it hard to wear the most comfortable stuff like high end sneakers. What worries me though is the occasional numbness. Off to the doc with the doc, I guess.
 

New Tricks

Platinum Member
1) Go to the doctor. he will make a mold of your feet and have orthodic arch supports made. wear the a couple weeks and your heel pain is gone. Keep wearing then and it won't come back.

There is no 2.
 

Ruok

Silver Member
Thanks again, I've looked it up but it seems everyone has a different opinion about it. For you personally what treatments did you attempt or what worked?

I've also come to the conclusion unfortunately that I've done it to myself with drumming. I really bounce my foot pretty hard without noticing it and I guess I need to stop doing so which will be a very tough habit to break. I've already started investing in footwear that has more padding and that does seem to help. Working in an office environment makes it hard to wear the most comfortable stuff like high end sneakers. What worries me though is the occasional numbness. Off to the doc with the doc, I guess.
Hey Dr_Watso,

The doc gave me some exercises to do that were actually for plantar fasciitis and Morton's Neuroma. I was supposed to do them 3 times a day for 20 minutes each time. I never took the time to do them because I had a hard time understanding the directions and the diagrams didn't help. Plus I didn't have the desire to do it 3 times a day for that long. Shame on me.

She also gave me some gels to put in the arch of my feet. But I had a difficult time with them and it made my feet hurt in other areas that were not originally hurting. I was told to ice my feet once or twice a day, which I do. This helps a little. I also have arthritis in the feet as well.

I've tried various ointments too that is supposed to reduce swelling naturally. But nothing has helped.

It's funny you mention pedal technique. Just today I read in the latest edition of Modern Drummer (with Nate Smith on the cover) an article on pedals, foot technique and seating position that could contribute to shin splints and plantar fasciitis.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
I thought I was having Plantar Fasciitis a while back.

I went to a Chinese foot massage place, and it sent away.
 

jimzo

Senior Member
The heel pads with the holes help advance the day-to-day healing process and help cope with the pain. The pads can be used easily with other footwear; and are inexpensive in general.

(...and generally speaking; do not like to see anyone in pain.)
 
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