Head rebound on different size bass drums?

rpt50

Member
My son reports that it is harder to play rapid bass beats on his kit with the 22" bass drum than on his kit with the 16" bass drum. Both drums have the same super kick heads, and I tune them using the method I've seen on various youtube videos where the lugs are tightened just enough for the wrinkles to disappear when you put pressure in the middle. It appears (not surprisingly) that the larger diameter head has less rebound when tuned this way than the smaller head, but it sounds awesome.

So, is this anything that drummers do anything about? Do you tune larger diameter heads a little tighter to get more rebound? Is there an adjustment on the pedal that increases the rebound speed (he bought himself a real nice yamaha pedal that has many adjustments)? Thanks!
 

axisT6

Senior Member
Increased beater angle followed by increased spring tension will do the trick. Increase beater angle first. Then adjust spring tension to his liking. This assumes that the tuning stays the same.
 

rpt50

Member
Increased beater angle followed by increased spring tension will do the trick. Increase beater angle first. Then adjust spring tension to his liking. This assumes that the tuning stays the same.
So, by increased beater angle, do you mean have it set so it rests farther back from the head?
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
Bigger bass drums are harder to play because you're moving a lot more air in the drum. A 16" bass drum with just the wrinkles taken off the head will still be a lot tighter than a 22", wait until you try a 26" or a 28" bass drum.

Bass drum technique is a factor, if you're burying the beater it's going to be a struggle to play quick, same as leaving the stick in the head, it also ruins the sound and the head. Joe Morello has a good video on youtube that covers bass drum technique. Good practice = good playing.

Pedal setup is a personal thing like stick choice.

Physique also plays a part, a big guy can handle a big bass drum. I've not really seen many small guys use big bass drums. I'm 6'3" and I look stupid behind a kit with an 18" bass drum, I use 22" and 24" bass drums but still have to set them up and tune them differently to get the best sound.
 
T

The SunDog

Guest
Bigger bass drums are harder to play because you're moving a lot more air in the drum. A 16" bass drum with just the wrinkles taken off the head will still be a lot tighter than a 22", wait until you try a 26" or a 28" bass drum.
I'm learning this now. I've been playing 20" kick drums for 15 years and recently moved to 24". Skipping right past 22", the difference has taken some getting used to. It feels a lot different and the volume of the sizes plays different than I expected. When played softly the smaller drum seems to excite easier and get more volume than the larger drum. When playing hard the 20" quickly reaches its maximum volume and the 24" bass radically out performs the smaller.
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
As someone who place a bunch of fast kick I'll give my input.

I started with a 24, then 22, and am now down to a 20. no matter the head having a tighter batter helps with rebound, to a point.. there becomes a point where its like hitting a brick wall and you get no rebound (it will not sound like a bass drum at that point)

I have also found my 20 is great for playing fast double bass, I recently bought a kit with an 18 and its much harder.

I adjust my pedal settings for every drum. distance from head, spring tension etc. for speed if you have a lose bass skin you need tighter springs, I prefer the head to be tighter and the springs closer to half tension for speed.
 

River19

Senior Member
I have recently run into this as the kit I am playing now has sat for a few years and going back the batter head feels muddy to me so I have been playing around with tension on the batter head.

What impact have you guys noticed by increasing tension on the non-batter head.

Granted I haven't played with my bass tuning in a while, at least from a pedal feel perspective, so I haven't yet tried the simple combo of increasing tension on the batter side while decreasing tension on the non-batter side to hopefully keep the sound in the sweet spot of where I like it.......
 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
I note I seem to be faster and easier control with a 16 in kick, but I think it is because it has a quicker decay so each note stands out better. As you go up to larger kicks you slower decay and more overtones so it blurs together it seems so it isn't as clean so doesn't sound as fast. That's my hypothesis anyways. Funny I always loosen my spring as I find it feels resistant and seems to slow me down. I like my pedal loose as a goose so it has a wide springy movements if I tap it.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
What impact have you guys noticed by increasing tension on the non-batter head.
Depends on the depth of the bass drum. For a 14" and 16" depth bass drum I'll really crank the reso head up. Gets rid of the air in the drum quicker and you get a lovely big round sound. I have a full resonant head on these drums and mic it up about 3" away aimed at the centre.

For my 18" and 20" depth bass drums I tune the reso head up a little bit but not too much. I prefer thinner heads for deeper bass drums as there's too much space between batter and reso. The Attack no overtones single ply BD head is ideal. I have a ported head on both of these drums because the reso doesn't do much really.

I prefer 14" deep because you can do so much more with it and it's way more powerful because you have more interaction between batter and reso. Two heads are better than one, forgive the pun.
 

axisT6

Senior Member
So, by increased beater angle, do you mean have it set so it rests farther back from the head?
Exactly. I have mentioned the "whys" of this in the technique section. Look for Tank's "can't seem to play fast" thread.
 

Bretton

Silver Member
I recently switched from 24" to 20" and it really helped me move up a step with my heel-toe technique. Much more rebound. I also have a very tight batter head.

to combat the pitch increase, I made my own subkick, or rather, made the bass drum into it's own subkick, using a speaker, I added L brackets to the lugs on the inside, ran some cord through the brackets and speaker mounting holes, reverse wired it to an XLR jack (just looked at a picture of the inside of a yamaha subkick that I googled for reference), which I mounted in the former tom-holder hole in the drum.

 

River19

Senior Member
Depends on the depth of the bass drum. For a 14" and 16" depth bass drum I'll really crank the reso head up. Gets rid of the air in the drum quicker and you get a lovely big round sound. I have a full resonant head on these drums and mic it up about 3" away aimed at the centre.

For my 18" and 20" depth bass drums I tune the reso head up a little bit but not too much. I prefer thinner heads for deeper bass drums as there's too much space between batter and reso. The Attack no overtones single ply BD head is ideal. I have a ported head on both of these drums because the reso doesn't do much really.

I prefer 14" deep because you can do so much more with it and it's way more powerful because you have more interaction between batter and reso. Two heads are better than one, forgive the pun.
Thanks. I play an 18" deep BD and I tweaked my batter head up a little the other night and it feels better from a rebound standpoint, however I enjoyed the full deep thump I used to have and now it is a wee bit high for me.....I'll tweak the reso
 
Top