Haze from Western Wildfires

cbphoto

Gold Member
Here in the States, wildfires in the northwest have cast a haze over the Midwest and east coast.

Has anyone been impacted by this?

Normally, this view is as clear as glass.

AC2D6051-27A9-4DAD-BFBE-21A2D1678678.jpeg
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Wow not like that. Can you smell it also?
 

someguy01

Well-known member
It's a problem here, so much so that you can't really see the peaks and it has caused flight delays out of DIA. Not as bad as last year though, it's not raining ash on my shop.
 

sumdrumguy

Senior Member
That was us two weeks ago. Being central plains (Canadian Prairies) we got smoke from fires to the West and East. It rolled in and hung over us for 4-5 days. No wind at all. The air was nasty.

I've never been so happy to see blue skies.
 

MazdaRex

Member
I think I'm about 20 miles south of someguy01 in Colorado's Front Range. The foothills of the Rocky Mountains are about nine straight-line miles west of me. Normally, we have gorgeous views of the first peaks and you can clearly see ~50 miles to taller mountains. The last two weeks there's barely been anything at all visible - the very first foothill peaks just vanish into a brownish-grey haze. Reminds me of the beach on crazy hazy summer days where you can only see a few hundred yards into a hot fog.

Last year was really bad here, with several large fires in-state adding to the mess from California and the West Coast. Happy to send current and normal pictures if folks are interested.
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
My sister, in Maryland, said she could tell yesterday there was an issue. Smoke from Russia is also reaching the US.
 

Ransan

Senior Member
It's a problem here, so much so that you can't really see the peaks and it has caused flight delays out of DIA. Not as bad as last year though, it's not raining ash on my shop.
Agreed!
Here in SoCo if your dumb enough you can actually stare at the sun at times when it’s so hazy. I did as the phenomenon intrigues me.
Forget about seeing Pike during this time, we are some 40 miles south, usually visible 300+ days from us, on a foggy day is somewhat outlined even with last vestiges of snow cap.

More directly is, in the heat running the cooler, the smoke and acrid scent is really getting through the ducts, my wife who has asthma, gets into a sundowners fit during these situations.

This weekend in SW Montana was no better and in fact a worse zone for the fires, then where we live in CO.
It was humid due to the weather but sun was hazed over, so it was uncomfortable breathing as well.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I have been able to smell it here in Central Ohio. Strong. Like what it smells like here in the fall when people are doing fire pits and running chimneys. We have had grey sunsets with a blood red sun for a week now.

Crazy, and so sad. Especially that they seem to be caused more and more by human ignorance and selfishness, rather than natural events.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Blame this guy:
Uncle_Sam_style_Smokey_Bear_Only_You.jpg

I say this in jest. However, there is evidence that supports the idea that by going out of our way in the past to prevent a naturally occurring thing (wildfire), we actually made it worse by allowing fuel to accumulate in the forest. By making sure we didnt let fires happen, there is more combustible material in the forest, and this is why the wildfires of today are so bad.
 

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
Lack of forest management is the reason why wildfires get out of hand on the West coast. Certain groups oppose controlled burns of forest floor vegetation, and the use of firebreaks.

They think they're saving the wildlife habitat for the Spotted Owl or whatever, (their heart is in the right place I suppose) but what good is that when the entire county burns to the ground because there were no firebreaks?

Imagine a long line of dominos. Just one domino will knock the entire thing down if there aren't breaks in between. It's not rocket science.

But for decades, places like California have refused to employ these basic procedures, and these apocalyptic wildfires are the result of that.
 
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MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Lack of forest management is the reason why wildfires get out of hand on the West coast. Certain groups oppose controlled burns of forest floor vegetation, and the use of firebreaks.

They think they're saving the wildlife habitat or whatever, (their heart is in the right place I suppose) but what good is that when the entire county burns to the ground because there were no firebreaks?

Imagine a long line of dominos. Just one domino will knock the entire thing down if there aren't breaks in between. It's not rocket science.

But for decades, places like California have refused to employ these basic procedures, and these apocalyptic wildfires are the result of that.
We burn here in Arkansas and wildfires arent really an issue. A good portion of the state is forest too. I'm way more worried about a tree falling on my house than the woods catching fire.
 

someguy01

Well-known member
Lack of forest management is the reason why wildfires get out of hand on the West coast. Certain groups oppose controlled burns of forest floor vegetation, and the use of firebreaks.

They think they're saving the wildlife habitat for the Spotted Owl or whatever, (their heart is in the right place I suppose) but what good is that when the entire county burns to the ground because there were no firebreaks?

Imagine a long line of dominos. Just one domino will knock the entire thing down if there aren't breaks in between. It's not rocket science.

But for decades, places like California have refused to employ these basic procedures, and these apocalyptic wildfires are the result of that.
They also fail to realize that the small burns are part of the habit rejuvenation process. There are many species of flora in those areas that have some form of fire inhibitor in their seeds. Meaning, the seed must be exposed to heat/fire in order to germinate. The threat to fauna habitat is the failure to allow natural burns. When the small, low underbrush burns naturally, it lacks the intensity to ignite the trees.
Like he said, it's not rocket science, it's botany 101 to be exact, and it's not complicated.
 
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