Has anyone tried Cympads?

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
No I haven't Pol, but this statement, lifted from the site, makes me run for the hills! "reduces both volume and unwanted overtones and moderates sustain" Why would I want to reduce volume, reduce sustain, & worst of all, reduce overtones. What total bo^%$%&$cks! Are they seriously claiming this neoprene foam can select tones you want to keep & those you don't? Come on, I'm not that stupid. Why oh why, after spending years, refining exactly the sounds that I want, would I want to mute everything down. The very beauty of well made cymbals is the rich palate of overtones, so why would you want to monotone your pies?

Let's get real here. They might just provide a slight improvement in stand isolation, but I don't have a problem with that anyhow. The larger diameters will certainly mute the cymbal & reduce sustain, if that's what you really want, then fine, but that's about as cool as putting duct tape or moongel on your pies, YUK!! They might offer some slight benefit in terms of protection, but again, I've never had a problem.

I think they might help to tame horrible and/or cheap cymbals, but you can guess my answer on that.
 

NC68

Senior Member
The very beauty of well made cymbals is the rich palate of overtones, so why would you want to monotone your pies?
Can't say that I have tried them either but I agree with keep it simple's assessment above. I listened to the sound file comparisons and the one I thought sounded best was the one without the cympad.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
Can't say that I have tried them either but I agree with keep it simple's assessment above. I listened to the sound file comparisons and the one I thought sounded best was the one without the cympad.
Ah, I missed the sound files, thanks NC68. They confirm my suspicions. Those pads, especially the bigger ones, mute the cymbal, reduce sustain, & offer a more monotone focussed sound. The cymbal they chose is bright & glassy. I shudder to think what those pads would do to a complexed dry cymbal. Just about the only use I can think of for these pads, is to mute the cymbals for a quieter acoustic setting. In that context, I can see why Pol might like to try them. Personally, I'd rather hit lighter and/or change my sticks to a lighter style than gag my cymbals.
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
Not sure if this is right but I'd be expecting the pads to darken the cymbal sound because they are dampening in the middle in the high tone zone. I was thinking of using them with my top hi hat. Might work ok with my Stagg splash too.

Agree with what's said in principle re: letting your cymbals sing but these doodads are inexpensive and ya never know ... but if someone knows for sure, that would be ideal. I've not found any useful comments on other forums, apart from identical glowing reports on two forums that I'm sure is someone from the company.

I saw a YouTube test but it was poorly done IMO
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
I saw them at NAMM. The poor guy behind the table was trying to demo them to me
"can you hear the difference?"

But it's SO dang loud and noisy inside a NAMM hall that it's really impossible to hear anything, especially the subtle differences this product is supposed to produce.
 

bobdadruma

Platinum Member
Am I to understand that they dampen the bell of the pie to control the sound?
I won't be using them on my Agop's, 2oo2's, or K Cust Hybrids soon!
I don't have a problem with the sound of any of my pies.
I won't even use top felts on my crashes and rides.
I only use top felts on my hats because I have to.

Unless it is a cymbal that does not have a bell, (Flat Ride, etc) The bell is the most important part of the cymbal.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
Am I to understand that they dampen the bell of the pie to control the sound?
Technically, by damping the bell, the fundamental note is reduced somewhat, so there's more focus on the cymbal's harmonics. Same with a drumhead, which is why dot heads seem louder; the fundamental is reduced, so there are more highs (attack.) So in theory, the pads would help make cymbals shimmer more, only moderating the cymbal's own basic note.

I also remember them from the last NAMM show, and there is a difference when using the larger pads, but I can't recall if it was good or bad. But cymbals are seldom heard/mic'd so closely that anyone would really notice the fairly subtle differences.

Bermuda
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
I also remember them from the last NAMM show, and there is a difference when using the larger pads, but I can't recall if it was good or bad. But cymbals are seldom heard/mic'd so closely that anyone would really notice the fairly subtle differences.
I see what you mean. Maybe best to reserve for really quiet restaurant gigs, Steely Dan sessions and last-ditch attempts to resurrect dodgy cymbals ...
 

MikeM

Platinum Member
I saw them in the drum store and was intrigued by the smaller ones, which I thought might be good for the crashes so that they could swing around more freely. It kind of bugs me that some larger felts (and especially thick posts) dampen that movement so much.

But I didn't know that they were also meant to dampen a cymbal. Normally, I wouldn't never go for that idea, but I do have one 20" K Ride that could use some taming - I even put a half a moongel on it as an experiment, and it worked, despite that it made me feel dirty and cheap. Maybe I'll try one...
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Hey Pol why exactly do you want these? Is it because you are trying to limit cymbal volume while retaining a good tone?
Do you want these for gigs or is it for sound limiting for practice?
 

Pollyanna

Platinum Member
Larry, the other week at practice I wasn't happy with my hats' sound and looked on the web for ways of improving cymbal sounds. I found these things.

I figured that if people here had used the product then I'd get more reliable info about them than from the makers' marketing spiel ...
 

rickymolina

Junior Member
I've been using the Cympads for over a year. . and they work great!!..


Cympad optimize your cymbal sound

CYMPAD is an incredible, affordable and easy to use system for optimizing the sound and performance of virtually all cymbal sizes, types and brands. Cympad is specially designed and made from premium-grade cellular foam to simply and effectively protect your cymbals and control your sound.

When using Cympad the traditional felts are replaced .

Available in a six popular sizes and recommended for any drumming style or situation.
A sound investment

Cympad’s exclusive design enhances and controls cymbal sound.
Isolates cymbal vibration from the cymbal stand
Reduces both volume and unwanted overtones
Moderates sustain and increases articulation
Small size, big difference


Available in incremental sizes, Cympad is versatile and adjustable— providing a spectrum of dampening effects (from open to optimum) without tape, gum or
adhesive pads in a wide range of rehearsal, recording and performance applications.

•Live Sound (Concerts, Clubs, Casuals)
•Home and Studio Recording
•Band Rehearsal and Individual Practice
•Teaching Studios

http://web.mac.com/rickymolina/Ricky_Molina/Store.html

http://web.mac.com/rickymolina/Ricky_Molina/Store.html
 

Frank

Gold Member
I think it's an intriguing option in a quiet situation. Previously, every other muffler attempt actually killed the tone of the cymbals. These sound like they can legitimately reduce volume while not killing the tone of the cymbals.

I applaud any effort that might just reduce volume without killing tone. I'm going to have to try them.
 
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Fox622003

Gold Member
I've been using the Cympads for over a year. . and they work great!!..

Cympad optimize your cymbal sound

CYMPAD is an incredible, affordable and easy to use system for optimizing the sound and performance of virtually all cymbal sizes, types and brands. Cympad is specially designed and made from premium-grade cellular foam to simply and effectively protect your cymbals and control your sound.
Not very subtle, these CYMPAD guys, are they?


Fox.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
Not very subtle, these CYMPAD guys, are they?


Fox.
Yeah, with you on that Fox. Nothing like balanced critique & observation to build confidence in a product, lol. Might have been better if rickymolina answered some of the concerns.

I can see potential for reducing volume with minimal change to the sound in situations where that's an issue. Beyond that, I'm not convinced about the sonic benefit properties, in fact, the sound clips convinced me for most, it's a bad idea.

Care to post another advert by way of reply rickymolina?
 

daredrummer

Gold Member
Hmm these might work to keep my bottom hat more steady and straight... Felts bend all over the place and it's always at an angle. That's the only thing I would use them for though.
 

vyacheslav

Senior Member
I know I am resurrrecting an old thread....................


I just recently bought some Cympad "Optimizers" (40mm). Before I give my opinion, I think some of us may be missing the point on these things...............

The larger size "Moderators" (50, 60, 70, 80, 90mm) are designed to reduce overtones. Nothing wrong with that, if the situation calls for it. I know lots of guys who put some moon gel or tape on their cymbals in certain situations. The Cympads will certainly make this easier, and more asthetically pleasing.

The smaller size "optimizers" are 40mm, and are the same diameter as a standard cymbal felt, and are designed to replace your standard cymbal felts more so than "modifying" your cymbal sound. I found that the 40mm "Optimizer" was about 2/3 as thick as a large Gibraltar felt. I did the test on a 22" Zildjian K Constantinople Thin Ride, to see how it would affect darker and thinner cymbals. Playing very softly and subtley (with a thin maple stick, no less) I thought that the Cympad sounded virtually the same as the standard felt. If anything, it did take away just a tiny little bit of the overtones, but that cymbal has so many different and complex overtones that it would probably sound different with a thinner standard felt too. Also, I do not use any top felts on any of my cymbals, as I like all of them to swing freely. I make sure the sleeve comes up well beyond the felt to help protect the cymbal. Using two might make more of a difference, especially depending on the "play" of the cymbal (how tight the wingnut is). Keep in mind I did this test playing very subtley at a very soft volume. If you are cranking away or even just playing the cymbal normally, the difference won't be noticeable at all. They are defintley more durable than standard felts. Anything that touches the cymbal, be it felt, rigid foam, wood, metal, plastic etc. is going to dampen the cymbal in some way. For as cheap as Cympads are (I got mine for $1.50 each), it is certainly an inexpensive way to experiment! I haven't tried these yet with a small splash (I am not at my home now), but I will do so and report the results back on this thread. Incidentally, there was NO difference in the vibrations of the cymbal stand between the felt and the Cympad. I felt the stand with one while playing the cymbal with the other, and the vibrations of the stand were the same in both cases. Again, this might be different if you're really playing the cymbal loud, but playing soft I couldn't notice a difference.

Thanks for your time in reading this thread.
 
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vyacheslav

Senior Member
Hey daredrummer:

I recommend one of these for your bottom hi-hat cymbal:

http://www.gibraltarhardware.com/index.cfm?fa=partsdetail&curcat=2&bnd=11&cid=108&sid=476&pid=2093

I use these on all my hi-hats. The design keeps the cymbal "centered" at all times, and really helps if you have a bottom cymbal that likes to lean to one side/has a heavy spot (and a lot of mine do).. Even if you are cranking away on those hats, the bottom cymbal goes down with the stick hit put then pops right back up, almost like a breakaway rim in basketball. They really help the "chick" sound and all for under $4! Pearl makes an identical item as well.
 

randomrod

Junior Member
My friend used a 90mm Moderator Cympad on his 22" Meinl Sand Ride and I've tried one out on my 21" Sabian Groove Ride.

I thought they tidied up the sound of both rides but didn't spoil the tone - the Groove Ride has such a heavy bell compared to its comparatively thin bow, the bell sound was largely unaffected.

Would like to try the Hi-Hat set and the other crashes too!
 
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