Hard vs Soft Tonewoods

Morrisman

Platinum Member
When you say 'tonewoods for percussion' do you just mean drum shells, or does it include xylophone and marimba bars, woodblocks, claves, etc?

Because you'd want hardwoods for the ideophones, but drum shells can be soft or hard or blended to achieve different resonances.
 

SmoothOperator

Gold Member
When you say 'tonewoods for percussion' do you just mean drum shells, or does it include xylophone and marimba bars, woodblocks, claves, etc?

Because you'd want hardwoods for the ideophones, but drum shells can be soft or hard or blended to achieve different resonances.
I actually had a big nice post describing my question and informing my research, which was sacrificed to the network gods... Better to be short and sweet.

I ran across a tongue drum, which I ended purchasing, it was made with a cedar top with mahogany sides and bottom. Which as you suggest is counter intuitive, why use cedar for the top? I was familiar with the Natives of he Northwest using cedar plank drums, but I thought that was a functionality of availability rather than aesthetics, however (with research) cedar is a tone wood that does have intriguing properties, over hardwoods much as Toolate described.
 
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