Happy Feet

ShadoWReX

Member
In the past two months I heard two Masters -Bernard Purdie & Neil Peart say that they wear leather soled shoes to play. They both went on to say that the worst shoes to wear are rubber soled sneakers -which is what I wear.
Both said that the leather soled shoes allow them to feel the pedals which improves feel and accuracy & control. I guess that sneakers don't give the same feel.
What about the rest of you?
Does it really matter??
Does the type of music make this an issue???
 

longgun

Gold Member
In the past two months I heard two Masters -Bernard Purdie & Neil Peart say that they wear leather soled shoes to play. They both went on to say that the worst shoes to wear are rubber soled sneakers -which is what I wear.
Both said that the leather soled shoes allow them to feel the pedals which improves feel and accuracy & control. I guess that sneakers don't give the same feel.
What about the rest of you?
Does it really matter??
Does the type of music make this an issue???
Personally, I never paid attention to it.......................played in boots, dress shoes, chuck taylors..............never really mattered.

Granted, I'm not playing extremely difficult bass drum patterns. It may be necessary for crazy stuff.
 

Sjogras

Silver Member
I prefer a bit of friction between the shoe and the pedal, and I'm sure a hard leather sole would be pretty slippery on my Yamaha 9500, the footboard is almost entirely slick. So, sneakers with rubber sole is what I use.
 

mmulcahy1

Platinum Member
I like being able to slide (to a certain degree) my foot on my pedal(s), but I like having some friction, too. Otherwise, my feet slip too much.
 

Juniper

Gold Member
At home I prefer playing just with socks on as I don't like the feeling of playing with shoes on.

On stage it's always rubber souled sneakers. Always a bonus when there is the sticky remains of a spilled beer or two.

Playing with rubber souled shoes helps keep your feet protected from shock and general wear and tear, sure most of us are guilty of hitting and playing harder under a live situation and I do a lot of running so I like to keep my feet wrapped up for live playing.
 

Jonny Sumo

Senior Member
Leather soles...hmmm...played a gig couple of years age and forgot my trusty converse boots so played in leather soled boots with a 3/4 inch heel; went better than usual to be honest...but for the best results...bare feet and rubber underwear...oh yes...
 

JustJames

Platinum Member
It actually costs them twice as much! Having 4 feet is a disadvantage sometimes, though I bet there are a few guys here that would love to work on their quadruple-pedal skills.
This is a common misconception. It's only the first purchase that's more expensive.

After that, because the wear is spread evenly over the four slippers, they last twice as much as biped slippers.

It's a little known fact that animal slippers - as worn by animals - often take the form of cartoon humans.
 

TColumbia37

Silver Member
I have a pair of New Balance running shoes. They were some sort of Vibram edition, so they're super thin. They have rubber soles, but the grip isn't much of an issue for me, as when I play more intricate kick patterns, I'm usually playing heel toe. They work great, but they're so ugly that I wouldn't dare take them to a gig. I usually just play in my socks anyway. That's the most comfortable to me. Just have to make sure I bring a fresh pair to the show. Don't want to stink the audience out of the place.
 

Anon La Ply

Renegade
If it's not cold I far prefer bare feet, otherwise I wear very light slipper shoes. I don't understand how people can play at their best in shoes. Of course it comes down to what you're used to ... but why did people first decide to get used to playing while wearing shoes? To practice being able to play while looking professional? Because support for your feet matters more to you than sensitivity to the pedal?
 

Chunky

Silver Member
I think it's a bit daft of them 2 to suggest there is one proper way to do things. Especially seens as they aren't exactly the busiest of bass drum players...

I can see their logic and the rigidity (is that a word?) of the tough leather soles can be useful for some things but trainers on the other hand give a bit more flex back. Like how your feet are actually meant to be able to move.
Then, there's barefeet which you would assume is superior seens as you're not choking your joints at all.
Let's all wear biker gloves so we can really feel our double strokes...

Whatever works for you man.
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
It actually costs them twice as much! Having 4 feet is a disadvantage sometimes, though I bet there are a few guys here that would love to work on their quadruple-pedal skills.
Do they need to rotate slippers every so often so they wear evenly? Quadruple pedals, hmmmmm. I'd give it a whirl.

I played in sneakers for years, thought it would help or something. Then one day day I tried it shoeless, and it felt so much better. Gotta have socks on though, don't like barefoot.
 

BabyBob

Silver Member
I prefer playing bare footed, easier to be "one" with the pedal.

Yeah I feel wearing any shoes reduces the feel to the pedal.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Maybe the worst shoes for them are rubber soled sneakers. I play heel down with rebound so I don't like to give my ankle extra weight to move. Plus I have less ankle mobility with any kind of shoe on when I play, so it's black socks (and long pants) for me. Whatever shifts your gears.
 

Brian

Gold Member
I've learned to dislike rubber soled sneakers, at least ones that have a new sole.

The best shoes I have for drumming are these black slip-on dress shoes I found from a decade ago. They are extremely lightweight and the soles are smooth and worn, so they slide easily. Plus they look pretty sharp.
 

Xero Talent

Silver Member
I've played everything from barefoot, sandals, army boots, Doc Martin's, sneakers, rubber boots, wooden shoes...

Doesn't affect my playing. Neither does the colour of my shirt.
 

bigiainw

Gold Member
I prefer a bit of friction between the shoe and the pedal, and I'm sure a hard leather sole would be pretty slippery on my Yamaha 9500, the footboard is almost entirely slick. So, sneakers with rubber sole is what I use.
I have a selection of sneakers etc that I wear. I have one pair of skechers that are stickier than the others that I just can't get on with- they allow no slipage at all, which is fine for slower stuff, but when I heel and toe I need a bit of slip. I can't play in socks or bare feet either- don't like the feel of the pedals on my feet, but in the end its about what works for you.
 
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