Hand-hammering and re-creating cymbals

Cymbalrider

Pioneer Member
I've been having problems getting the .mp3s on your page to work. It's fun to listen to all the cymbal conversions, especially the before and after ones. I think it's that file hosting page. It will say, to download click the link and when I do it goes back to the same page.

I would think the Sabian XS20s would be good for business as you can buy a b20 alloy cymbal for cheap to hammer.
 

delliejonut

Junior Member
Hey I was wondering if someone could post a picture of the tools used in cymbal crafting ie the anvil, the hammers, the lathe, ect. I've always been interested in this and it would help to have a visual reference to know what tools I'm going to need to get.
 

foursticks

Pioneer Member
As I said before please browse the websites of some turkish cymbalbrands like Istanbul or Bosphorus, there you will see all the tools. I use virtually the same.

Luke Flowers from the Cinematic Orchestra is also playing my cymbals from now on.
Ah I've met Luke. He's a TOP bloke and drummer. I'll ask him about your cymbals next time I meet him!
 

mofle

Silver Member
Hi Johan!

I have a question about hammering. Whenever I hammer a cymbal, it turns out dry and almost dead. How do I hammer it to get some lifi into it? Hope you can help me.

And I do not have a lathe. Thanks

P.S. May I say you make some mighty fine cymbals. They are art, every last one of them.
 

dea

Senior Member
You are employing complex lathing patterns, but there seems to be a method to this. I'd be interested to understand how these lathing patterns differ and how they affect the sound. Does it make it crisper? Brighter?
 

AZsabianprez

Junior Member
SVKelleher10
Hand hammering a cymbal is an art and you really need to understand what you are doing to the metal before you can craft the sound to what you are looking for. That being said,
do you have any experience with hammering cymbals? I'll tell you this much, any hammering done incorrectly to your cymbal will certainly achieve the 'dead' sound you are looking for. When you bend the shape of a cymbal from the taught bow of a finished instrument, you are changing the tension of the metal. When you hammer the cymbal out of shape you release the tension, or at best alter it, and the instrument no longer supports itself as well as it did when you got it. That will definitely 'smother' the sound. Be very careful not to over hammer the cymbal, that will make stress points on the cymbal that will make it easier to break in those places.
Personally, I would use tape. Simple and easily reversible.
 

OldStampK

Member
Johan, I've been lurking on this thread for a while and have to say that your cymbals rock my world. I've been doing some research and have found that there are a couple of guys over here that do similar work to what you're doing. Here's a link that may be helpful to stateside cymbal seekers. Check out the Mike Skiba page. I've been in contact with Mike. He charges $85 plus shipping for cymbal recreation. I'm sending him an overweight (to my ears anyway) Bosphorus Trad ride for a little slimming down. I'll let you all know how it turms out. If he can make this already good cymbal sound even better, then I'll probably have him work on some not-so-good cymbals of mine.

Thanks for the inspiration.

http://www.rarevintagecymbals.com/index.htm

I've tried hammering my own cymbals before and would not recommend it to anyone who doesn't have the budget to learn through trial and error. You're definately going to ruin some cymbals before you start getting it right.
 
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I have access to a steel round that is 4.5" in diameter and 1.77" thick. Would this be too thin or too small to be used as an anvil? What are the consequences of an anvil that are too thin? Thanks.
 
Johan,

Thanks for your reply. I've read most of your posts on drummerworld and cymbalholic as well as checking out a few of your live peformance clips. You are a highly skilled drummer and craftsmen.

I was planning to shape the anvil face using a belt sander as mentioned in the cymbalholic Skiba article. You mentioned that it would be impossible to hammer the bottom with a high bell profile. Is this because I would be unable to contact the metal of the cymbal with the anvil because the bell would be contacting the anvil base? So this anvil might be alright for smaller cymbals (such as hi-hats) but could run into problems for larger cymbals whose bell height is larger then the anvil height....correct?

I'm from the US and would like you to modify a cymbal but the shipping costs are too prohibitive for me at this time. I will be in Paris in a few weeks. How far are you from Paris? Maybe I could hand deliver it.

Thanks again,

Colin
 
My anvils still have not arrived. I have been working on shaping my hammers. I have heard the face of the hammer should have a curved surface too. Does this mean a slight curve or a very large curve. Since people don't seem to use the backside of a ball peen hammer I assume that is too much curve. Should it be just a little more curved then flat or a big curve?

Thanks for all the help thus far.
 

Dangerous Dave

Junior Member
Hello Johan. You did some amazing work here. I have a question for you. I have a Paiste 502 Bronze 14" hi-hat. What effect would I get if I hammer the body of the cymbals and leave the bell intact? Would I get them to ring more in an open position or what?
thx
Dado
 

RudimentalDrummer

Pioneer Member
Is This Real ........ about our Bro Johan

Tell me it';s not True.ee he's a great guy....please.eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee




---Quote (Originally by Astrosoniq@cymbalholic)---

This is what the local newspaper has written:
(please dont mind the poor translation, it is probably better than googles)


---Quote---
Brugge - Consternation in the Brugian music community. Last week tuesday Johan van der Sijpe has died. Born in Sijsel and lived to become 43. Van de Sijpe was seen as one of Belgiums most talented drummers in his generation.

'He could play all styles, from jazz to rock', says Philippe Lefief, ex-musician en today active at the website Moon Art Gallery.

In the 80's Van de Sijpe started with Cerceuil, later on he also played with Chacok Twice, Bronks and Cowboys and Aliens. His most succesfull engagement was with Jo Lemaire, with whom he also toured extensively. He played drums at reunion shows of St.James. His last group was coverband Noisy Neighbours.

'Johan has never found a group with wider recognition. Everybody appreciated him, but he has never realised it himself', reminisces Roel Jacobus, bassplayer with Skov. Van de sijpe, who resided in the province West-Vlaanderen, lived a reclusive life.

'Johan was a dreamer. He even designed his own cymbals', says Lefief.
---End Quote---
Original post: http://cymbalholic.com/forums/showpost.php?p=285742&postcount=44

Original article (in dutch) :http://www.standaard.be/Artikel/Detail.aspx?artikelId=X228037_1
---End Quote---

***************
 

fooleeze

Senior Member
I don't know if its appropriate for me to be the one posting this, but I have just learned this terrible news today.

Sadly, it was confirmed that Johan VDS passed away at his home on June 25th. This is terrible news, and I don't know what I can possible say about it at this time. . .

I worked a lot with him over the past year, picking his brain, and having him make many cymbals for me. His work is amazing, but what many may not know is was a better person than a cymbalsmith. Not to take away from his cymbal work, it was truly amazing. But I think he was an even better person to know.

Rest is peace, Johan.

Excerpts from a local newspaper:

Brugge - Consternation in the Brugian music community. Last week tuesday Johan van der Sijpe has died. Born in Sijsel and lived to become 43. Van de Sijpe was seen as one of Belgiums most talented drummers in his generation.

'He could play all styles, from jazz to rock', says Philippe Lefief, ex-musician en today active at the website Moon Art Gallery.

In the 80's Van de Sijpe started with Cerceuil, later on he also played with Chacok Twice, Bronks and Cowboys and Aliens. His most succesfull engagement was with Jo Lemaire, with whom he also toured extensively. He played drums at reunion shows of St.James. His last group was coverband Noisy Neighbours.

'Johan has never found a group with wider recognition. Everybody appreciated him, but he has never realised it himself', reminisces Roel Jacobus, bassplayer with Skov. Van de sijpe, who resided in the province West-Vlaanderen, lived a reclusive life.

'Johan was a dreamer. He even designed his own cymbals', says Lefief.
 
M

Mediocrefunkybeat

Guest
A real shame. I was hoping to one day send off my hi hats to Johan for some re-working, but it seems not to be. As we lose another member of this forum too soon, my heart grows heavy.
 

stasz

Platinum Member
I can't believe it. I hope that this is somehow not true... I often came through this thread and read his hugely extensive knowledge on cymbalmaking and the art that it is. I just now before reading the above post saw a link in this thread to a video of him playing a solo which can be seen here. Not only was he infinitely knowledgeable on cymbals, he was a fantastic drummer. My thoughts and prayers go out to his family.
 
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