guitar help!

davor

Senior Member
hello drummer friends, wrong forum I know!

Ive been dabbling with my guitar a bit lately (nice to have another instrument, where you can be rubbish at it but thats ok, as drums is your main thing!)
Anyway.... the guitar in question (a Squier affinity strat) has a slightly damaged body. I kind of fancy having a project, so am looking into swapping the body out (i.e. keep everything else). My question is... when getting a new body (used off fleabay probably) does it need to be the exact model (Squier Affinity from around mid 2000s) or can it be any start body that will take 3 single coil pickups? Another option could be to buy an unfinished body and paint myself.

I'd rather not join a guitar forum to get into this, and you know some of you folks like to dabble in guitars too!

Any tips much appreciated :)

PS , I'm anticipating people saying things like... its a squier so why bother? may as well just get another guitar etc etc... thats fair enough, but I've seen some cheap bodies online and I fancy a project as I've got a bit more time on my hands!
 

wraub

Well-known member
In general, Squier parts will just swap out.
Some years of mfg may have slightly different specs, which is also true of Squiers from different countries.
Also, an Affinity Squier and a Standard Squier may have slightly different specs.

Where was yours made (what's the first part of the serial #?) http://www.squierwiki.com/Serial-Number-Tracking

All this means is that you may wind up with a gap here or there, but at least the intonation should match. Squier parts swapped to other Squiers can make for some impressive instruments. ;) I notice there's a few Affinity bodies on the bay right now.

I have a few Squier instruments- my old ones are identical to Fenders of the era, the later ones are like every other Squier. I've never worried about parts.
 

wraub

Well-known member
In general, Squier parts will just swap out.
Some years of mfg may have slightly different specs, which is also true of Squiers from different countries.
Also, an Affinity Squier and a Standard Squier may have slightly different specs.

Where was yours made (what's the first part of the serial #?) http://www.squierwiki.com/Serial-Number-Tracking

All this means is that you may wind up with a gap here or there, but at least the intonation should match.
Squier parts swapped to other Squiers can make for some impressive instruments. ;)

I notice there's a few Affinity bodies on the bay right now.

No slights against Squier from me- As with most instruments, they're made to a price point, and some can be markedly better than others.
I have a few Squier instruments- my old ones are identical to Fenders of the era, the later ones are like every other Squier. I've never worried about parts.


hello drummer friends, wrong forum I know!

Ive been dabbling with my guitar a bit lately (nice to have another instrument, where you can be rubbish at it but thats ok, as drums is your main thing!)
Anyway.... the guitar in question (a Squier affinity strat) has a slightly damaged body. I kind of fancy having a project, so am looking into swapping the body out (i.e. keep everything else). My question is... when getting a new body (used off fleabay probably) does it need to be the exact model (Squier Affinity from around mid 2000s) or can it be any start body that will take 3 single coil pickups? Another option could be to buy an unfinished body and paint myself.

I'd rather not join a guitar forum to get into this, and you know some of you folks like to dabble in guitars too!

Any tips much appreciated :)

PS , I'm anticipating people saying things like... its a squier so why bother? may as well just get another guitar etc etc... thats fair enough, but I've seen some cheap bodies online and I fancy a project as I've got a bit more time on my hands!
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
You must, must , MUST make absolutely sure the scale is the same. If it is not the same, your neck is then useless. What I mean is the distance between nut and saddle must be the same. If it is different, the frets will no longer be in the correct location for their notes, and will be completely useless. If anything, this is the most important part besides getting the neck straight. The rest doesnt matter.

Look at it this way, you have to use the correct size head and hoop for the drum. The rest doesnt matter. A head too big or small wont work for that particular drum. Same with the guitar. The neck is made for a certain scale length. You must adhere to that length or the neck wont work.
 

wraub

Well-known member
This is true, and why I mentioned intonation above.

The scale length on an Affinity Strat is 25.5" (648 mm), as on almost all Strats.

You must, must , MUST make absolutely sure the scale is the same. If it is not the same, your neck is then useless. What I mean is the distance between nut and saddle must be the same. If it is different, the frets will no longer be in the correct location for their notes, and will be completely useless. If anything, this is the most important part besides getting the neck straight. The rest doesnt matter.

Look at it this way, you have to use the correct size head and hoop for the drum. The rest doesnt matter. A head too big or small wont work for that particular drum. Same with the guitar. The neck is made for a certain scale length. You must adhere to that length or the neck wont work.
 

davor

Senior Member
follow all that...which brings my other question....what about generic unfinished strat bodies? assuming the scale length is ok, would there be anything else to consider?
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
follow all that...which brings my other question....what about generic unfinished strat bodies? assuming the scale length is ok, would there be anything else to consider?
Nope, that is the most important part. The electronics have nothing to do with the neck. You want 1 pickup, do it. You want 5 pickups, do that then. As long as the scale remains the same. That is the most important part.
 

Naigewron

Platinum Member
follow all that...which brings my other question....what about generic unfinished strat bodies? assuming the scale length is ok, would there be anything else to consider?
Yes, neck pocket dimensions and shape. Not all necks fit all guitars, even if the scale length matches. Telecaster necks won't even fit Stratocasters and vice versa.

I recommend heading over to the Strat-Talk forums; they'll answer any and all questions you may have :)

 

KamaK

Platinum Member
Squire (Indonesia/China) parts are no longer the same parts as a normal Fender. I'm not sure about the Affinity series, but have heard issues fitting USA/MX necks on the "Vintage Modified" series.

The last Squire I set up was last year.

If you are sold on the Strat, I would recommend selling your current Squire and obtaining a quality used USA or MX model. Alternatively, there are used USA G&L guitars on the market for the $500 area. I even put mine on CL occasionally for $500.

 

johnwesley

Silver Member
Wow. I've learned something outside the realm of drums. Thanks. Not that I'm abdicating my (drum) throne for that of a peasant guitar serf or anything, but interesting to learn more about how the other side lives.
 

wraub

Well-known member
Short answer- not always. A Strat is a Strat, generally, but there are dozens if not hundreds of different body makers around. Sometimes the mounting holes won't match up, sometimes the pockets for neck and controls aren't cut right, some bodies are thinner than others and some, while matching in scale length, may be slightly different in overall size from yours. Additionally true of pickguards, not all will just fit.

Also, it may depend on how skilled you are working with wood and woodworking tools, and how accurately you can measure. Have you done similar work before?

I ask because I've done a lot of guitar mods and set-ups, and know both how easy and how complicated it can be. ;)


The suggestion above to go to the Strat forum is a good one- you could also try here- http://www.squier-talk.com/ .

The wood in your Strat body is reportedly agathis, which is a softer wood like basswood. Some replacement bodies use pine, or pawlonia, which can be even softer. This can lead to screws pulling out, not good for things under tension. ;)
Also, a lighter body may promote neck dive, so, consider these items while you shop.




follow all that...which brings my other question....what about generic unfinished strat bodies? assuming the scale length is ok, would there be anything else to consider?
 
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wraub

Well-known member
@davor

I don't know where you are located, but there are half a dozen or so Affinity Strat bodies on the bay right now for under $100 with US shipping, and one on reverb (made in Indonesia) for $70 with US shipping (I have no affiliation with any of these sales).
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Also, a lighter body may promote neck dive, so, consider these items while you shop.
I always end up with guitars that have this problem. If I move the front strap knob to one of the screws that hold the neck on, it solves this problem.
 

davor

Senior Member
@davor

I don't know where you are located, but there are half a dozen or so Affinity Strat bodies on the bay right now for under $100 with US shipping, and one on reverb (made in Indonesia) for $70 with US shipping (I have no affiliation with any of these sales).
I'm in the UK and there are surprisingly few Affinity bodies on the bay. Does it matter what the shape of the cavities are for the electronics? Sometimes you see 3 for single coils and others have just one huge hole (which presumably takes any permutation of pick ups?!)
 

Naigewron

Platinum Member
I'm in the UK and there are surprisingly few Affinity bodies on the bay. Does it matter what the shape of the cavities are for the electronics? Sometimes you see 3 for single coils and others have just one huge hole (which presumably takes any permutation of pick ups?!)
Depends. If you want to go with the classic strat triple-single coil configuration, you'll be fine with any body. The huge hole (often called a swimming pool route) is handy if you want to keep your options open and maybe chuck a humbucker or two in there somewhere.
 

wraub

Well-known member
The giant route is called a "swimming pool" route, and works for almost all pickups that you'd find on a Strat. The shaped ones are appropriately shaped, usually.

I'm in the UK and there are surprisingly few Affinity bodies on the bay. Does it matter what the shape of the cavities are for the electronics? Sometimes you see 3 for single coils and others have just one huge hole (which presumably takes any permutation of pick ups?!)
 

wraub

Well-known member
Ime, wood fillers are always inferior to actual wood, and almost always require follow-up attention later, as settling as shrinkage :oops: occur.
Bondo is usually okay, depending on the size of the area, or epoxy can work, also.



You can't fix the body with plastic wood? Is the guitar playable now?
 
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