grip question

FstBoy1

Junior Member
pretty simple question but may be hard to explain but hopefully not. :)

what i am wondering is, when holding the stick and u have ur back fingers curled around the stick, where should the back of the stick be? its really hard to explain without pictures but... should it sort of in the middle of your palm sort of hugging your "life line" by your thumb.... or shoud the back of the stick be turned more towards your pinky.

i dunno if that creates any picture or makes any sense at all of what im tryin to explain but let me know if ya need me to try explaining it another way or if u get wat im tryin to say then just drop some feedback. :) any help will be greatly appreciated. :) thx
 

ExPLiciT

Senior Member
from my knowledge it depends on the person and the hands. every ones hand is different and therefore every ones stick will sit a a little differently. im assuming you are a playing palm down style grip from your explanation, so if your sticks sit a little towards the right or left it may be fine, but if you have a teacher have him look at it and make sure your grip is correct.

hope that helped =)
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
The back of my stick is at the back of my hand. Sometimes a tad inside of it with no stick showing.
 

abe

Senior Member
pretty simple question but may be hard to explain but hopefully not. :)

what i am wondering is, when holding the stick and u have ur back fingers curled around the stick, where should the back of the stick be? its really hard to explain without pictures but... should it sort of in the middle of your palm sort of hugging your "life line" by your thumb.... or shoud the back of the stick be turned more towards your pinky.

i dunno if that creates any picture or makes any sense at all of what im tryin to explain but let me know if ya need me to try explaining it another way or if u get wat im tryin to say then just drop some feedback. :) any help will be greatly appreciated. :) thx
I try to hold stick so that butt of stick is on flashy part of palm below pinky and just above wrist's bony part. Hypothenar eminence muscles absorbs shock thus there is small possibility to hurt your palm with a stick. I hope that makes sense. I added small picture from Dom Famularo's book and colored the shock absorbing area.
 

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ExPLiciT

Senior Member
correct me if im wrong but isnt bad technique to let the stick hit your hand unless your catching it.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I disagree with the illustration. I like the butt of the stick at the base of the palm, at the crease created by the thumb, with no protrusion into the wrist area.
 

zzdrummer

Senior Member
There is a common phrase, tip to elbow, so that when you hold your stick out the tip is lined up with the elbow. Thats old school way of doing it. I use that or a little outside that which I find helps me use more fingers.
 

MattRitter

Senior Member
One of my first teachers taught me to let the butt of the stick sit in the groove down the center of the palm. Later, I studied Moeller technique with Jim Chapin. Jim taught me to let the butt of the stick rest on the "pad under the pinky" so that it protrudes out from the side of the hand. Then, after years of playing that way, I went to a master teacher from the classical world. One of the first things he told me to change was my grip. He told me to go back to having the stick sit in the center groove of the hand!

OK...so where does all of this leave us? Well, my interpretation of this adventure is that BOTH approaches must be "correct" in their own way. My own experience has shown me that letting the stick sit in the center groove works well for most general playing. It creates a straight line with the forearm, and it aligns the stick with the direction that our wrist bends. Angling the stick so that it sits on the "pad under the pinky" works well when forearm rotation is used. I recently re-watched Jim Chapin's video, and sure enough, he specifically emphasizes that Sanford Moeller wanted his students to play with a rotation of the forearm. So Jim teaches a grip that works perfectly for the forearm rotation advocated by Moeller.

With all of this in mind, my personal recommendation for you is to practice most of your drumming with the stick in the center groove of the hand. For Moeller technique, hold the stick as advocated by Jim Chapin- angled to rest on the "pad under the pinky."

I hope this info helps. Best of luck!

Matt Ritter
Bass Drum Techniques For Today's Drummer
www.UnBuryingTheBeater.com
 
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