Great Audition: No Gig

richkenyon

Silver Member
I hope this doesn't come across as indulgent, but I think it will help me putting this into words.
Did an audition the other day - learned the 3 tracks & did my homework. It's an original situation with quite a nice prospect of a support tour in Europe. The music is pretty accessible & I enjoyed it.... Anyway, I nailed the audition, which involved playing along with a click & sequencer. The band leader was pretty gushing about how good everything sounded & felt....Went for a beer after & got on great (I know that side of things is important) & we talked about how to move the project forward.
I'm not a kid anymore & tried to explain that whilst money isn't vital (you have to speculate to accumulate) I was most concerned that the project would be done right, with good sound engineers, no travelling in the back of a van - and I believed we had a good understanding. What he was going to get in return was a player with tons of live experience & I hope is pro in every way.
I left the audition understanding I had the gig & was pleased about it because it was something to look forward to in the Autumn. Yesterday I got a call saying that whilst I did the best audition & was "a great guy" they decided to go with another drummer that was local.
The subtext is that the music is not the focal point for the band. It's not the first time I have discovered that in musicians, but it is always a depressing reality. My suspicion is that the other drummer was prepared to "work" for nothing just to get the experience.
So, all in all I feel pretty sick of the business right now.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
That's gutting, & I suspect, their loss. "Fit" is such a difficult thing to nail down, & getting to the bottom of someone's true motivation priorities on first meet is close to impossible. Suck it up, move on, & be glad that this early clean rejection has probably saved you a lot of wasted time & grief later on.
 

last man to bat

Senior Member
These things happen Rich, bands are fickle. It's a bit like doing all the dating stuff only to find out that you have been sidelined for another guy. It could be a whole load of reasons why they went with the other guy and not you, maybe you came across as too good. But I know how you feel and it's a rotten feeling.
 

richkenyon

Silver Member
That's gutting, & I suspect, their loss. "Fit" is such a difficult thing to nail down, & getting to the bottom of someone's true motivation priorities on first meet is close to impossible. Suck it up, move on, & be glad that this early clean rejection has probably saved you a lot of wasted time & grief later on.
Much appreciated! That's why I try to discuss things like "expectation" at the earliest stage. I mean, the last touring project I did (a Genesis tribute) I made it clear I need a minimum wage from it because it was going to affect everything else I did, not to mention the sheer work involved....that was agreed and STILL it was not honoured.

These things happen Rich, bands are fickle. It's a bit like doing all the dating stuff only to find out that you have been sidelined for another guy. It could be a whole load of reasons why they went with the other guy and not you, maybe you came across as too good. But I know how you feel and it's a rotten feeling.
In this instance I know the "other guy"! I'm actually very fond of him & I am pleased for him. I have no issue with the other drummer at all.
 

Too Many Songs

Senior Member
Almost exactly the same thing happened to me about 6 months ago.

If you haven't already check out the auditions for the seat in Dream Theatre (Bernhard has posted the videos on here somewhere). Should make you feel better knowing that sometimes even guys like Thomas Lang, Derek Roddy and Virgil Donati don't make the short list!
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
Things are very subjective in music, and qualification and a good dialogue and everything seemingly going right, don't always add up to getting the gig. There are other factors, sometimes litle nuances, that make someone else 'fit' better. As mentioned, that's hard to define, and not something you can really prepare for or build into the audition... it's just a feeling that the people doing the hiring have, often determined after the fact, as in the case of your audition.

There'll be other auditions and other bands, this one may be a blessing in disguise.

Bermuda
 

richkenyon

Silver Member
Almost exactly the same thing happened to me about 6 months ago.

If you haven't already check out the auditions for the seat in Dream Theatre (Bernhard has posted the videos on here somewhere). Should make you feel better knowing that sometimes even guys like Thomas Lang, Derek Roddy and Virgil Donati don't make the short list!
Yes - I've seen that & really enjoyed it!

Things are very subjective in music, and qualification and a good dialogue and everything seemingly going right, don't always add up to getting the gig. There are other factors, sometimes litle nuances, that make someone else 'fit' better. As mentioned, that's hard to define, and not something you can really prepare for or build into the audition... it's just a feeling that the people doing the hiring have, often determined after the fact, as in the case of your audition.

There'll be other auditions and other bands, this one may be a blessing in disguise.

Bermuda
You're exactly correct in what you say... thanks for the post.
 

inneedofgrace

Platinum Member
The question is, if the drummer selected proves to be a mistake, and they give you a call in a couple months, would you take the job (assuming you're still available)? It would be tough for me to say yes after being passed over like that. Yet if it were purely a business decision and not a personal decision, then maybe it could still work out in the long run.
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
Same thing happened to me about a month ago, actually. I auditioned to play bass for a cover band, totally NAILED the audition, and was scheduled to play the next three gigs on the books with them. I had the gig. Less than a week later the bandleader e-mailed me (didn't even call--how unprofessional/inconsiderate), and said that they decided to go "a different route". How lame is that? I was really looking forward to it, too. Fun gigs, great guys, typical cover band music (which is fun to me...), but I felt as if I got the shaft on the deal. Lame lame lame!
 

whoreian

Senior Member
dont feel bad for yourself or fret about it.
why?

1.it was an experience to learn from and the next time to encounter this again you wont be shocked
2.there's always a right time and place for everyone and while this time was unfortunately not the time for you don't worry your time will definitely come especially the way you are talking about music.
3.it doesnt mean your playing is bad at all(they knew you were good) so basically this tells you that so long as you do your job and play well and be professional, you will benefit in the end,you will get the gigs with other bands that care more about your playing and lastly, you will know that the band and not you, is the one to 'blame' for not getting the gig.

just know that you did your job and respected the band and kept your integrity and professionalism as a musician and that is what will get you to success.
4.be comforted with the fact that so many successful people failed auditions or interviews tons of times. everyone starts small and through all the hardship and disappointments you will learn and benefit from it and bounce back up if you have the will.
5.the music industry,just like ANY industry, has people like the ones you met-they go for the cheapest alternatives,disregarding the music quality and dont share the passion you have(to work hard to achieve,and not avoid all obstacles and run away). while this can be very depressing, dont let them get to your head,because the reason why obstacles are there are to distinguish those determined enough to climb over them and those that lack the drive to do so.

i myself have gone through to many 'failures' but really ive learnt that success comes with many failures and failures are essential really.
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
I agree, being in a band is a lot like a marriage, and often it comes down to subtle little things.

Look at everything that went on with the Dream Theater auditions. All those guys nailed the songs, all of them were world class pros, but it came down to subtle things, like having a similar personality and a similar back ground.

Numerous times I've seen guys get a big gig, but then management feels they need a name player over the new name, and cans the guy right after he just told everyone he knew that he's the new drummer for name band.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
You might be so good as to be threatening to some. People are usually nice to your face. You never know what the other guys personal issues are.
 

TTNW

Pioneer Member
You might be so good as to be threatening to some. People are usually nice to your face. You never know what the other guys personal issues are.
So true. I've not been asked back only to find out later that I made them nervous because I was good.

Also, I've been not asked to come back because I wasn't good enough and it made them uncomfortable to say so.

Your playing and personality should be the most important factor but often it's not.
It's music, and it's personal and it's business and that's just the way it goes.

Sometimes my ego suffers and other times it's very gratifying.

I don't care. I just love to play with other musicians so much that I will always take the bad with the good.
 

TTNW

Pioneer Member
Here's to taking the bad with the good.
This should be a Bud Lite commercial.

Drummers that are awesome. Drummers that suck. We salute you. Here's to you Drummer. etc.. etc.. etc.. I forgot exactly how the dude does it.

Now pack up your gear and lug it back to the car. Drummer that tries so hard, we salute you. Go have a beer.
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
The question is, if the drummer selected proves to be a mistake, and they give you a call in a couple months, would you take the job (assuming you're still available)? It would be tough for me to say yes after being passed over like that. Yet if it were purely a business decision and not a personal decision, then maybe it could still work out in the long run.
Would depend entirely on the circumstances (why the other drummer is leaving, etc.). Try to leave the ego out of it.

It's small comfort, but at least you've made a good impression on a group of people. When one of their friends need a drummer, maybe your name will be thrown into the hat. You've networked well.

I can't help but wonder: if you know the drummer who did get the gig, you must also have a very good idea of why you didn't get it: image, musical approach, compensation, too involved in other projects, etc. Thoughts?
 

Dwight

Junior Member
I was the drummer in a band once, I got in because:

1) My brother was co-leader.

2) The guitarist didn't own a guitar or amp so I loaned him my SG and amp and supplied him with cigarettes.

3) We practiced in my mom's garage.

4) I had a drivers license and access to a car.

Those were good times!
 

Bertram

Silver Member
I've been kicked out of a band because two of the three band members had a friend (who was a drummer ) that they'd rather have as a band member. Though i was twice as good as him. I knew them from my school, and actually liked them pretty much. I knew the drummer too, and he asked me alot about how i did that and when i do that.. I learned him stuff, and they ditch me..

I sooner teamed up with the 1 band member who actually liked me the most. and we started gigging and stuff, good times, now gone again. Good luck finding a group of people to play with ;)
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
Good thing is you found out where the bands real priorities are and you weren't let go while on the road.Sometimes the chemistry isn't right.No worries....a lesson learned...a hurtful one but none the less,you'll be the better because of it.

Steve B
 
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