Grammar Nazis. Get In Here!

Totigerus

Active Member
Why is "drumstick" a proper English word, but not "drumset?"
I'd even be OK with "drum-set" haha ..or conversely, changing drumstick back to "drum stick" to keep things fair.
Am I gonna have to call Webster's and make a complaint? 😆
They'll probably laugh at me for being ill-informed.
 

Al Strange

Platinum Member
If I may, I’d like to interject at this juncture.

I object to the punctuation you have, in my view, incorrectly applied. In particular I object to the way in which you have used title case in the second “sentence” of the thread title…can we amend accordingly as follows?

“Grammar National Socialists, get in here please!”

Thank you, ooh, that felt gooooood!:ROFLMAO:(y)

PS It’s drum kit.
PPS Irritated yet?
PPPS Irritated yet?:ROFLMAO:

PPPPS Edited due to grammatical errors.
 

I-P

Well-known Member
Triple Trouble Kanye GIF by Beastie Boys
 

Jeremy Crockett

Well-known Member
Here I was hoping for a "there, they're, and their" thread.

**sigh**

Also, what you have here is an etymological question, not a grammatical one. I second @Al Strange's request for a change of title.
 

TK-421

Senior Member
Here I was hoping for a "there, they're, and their" thread.

**sigh**

Also, what you have here is an etymological question, not a grammatical one. I second @Al Strange's request for a change of title.
+1

Though if I were to take a stab at the OP's question, my guess is because a drumstick refers to a singular object while a drum set refers to a collection of objects. So why is a hockey stick two words? Because "hockey" is multisyllabic, hence hockeystick becomes a bit more cumbersome. Drumstick and chopstick both have short, monosyllabic root words (drum and chop, respectively), so they're more suitable to forming compound words.
 

Totigerus

Active Member
+1

Though if I were to take a stab at the OP's question, my guess is because a drumstick refers to a singular object while a drum set refers to a collection of objects. So why is a hockey stick two words? Because "hockey" is multisyllabic, hence hockeystick becomes a bit more cumbersome. Drumstick and chopstick both have short, monosyllabic root words (drum and chop, respectively), so they're more suitable to forming compound words.
"broom stick" and "broomstick" are both in the dictionary and monosyllabic words, so basically, nothing makes sense in English. I give up.
 

Matt Suda

Member
+1

Though if I were to take a stab at the OP's question, my guess is because a drumstick refers to a singular object while a drum set refers to a collection of objects. So why is a hockey stick two words? Because "hockey" is multisyllabic, hence hockeystick becomes a bit more cumbersome. Drumstick and chopstick both have short, monosyllabic root words (drum and chop, respectively), so they're more suitable to forming compound words.
Candlestick, fiddlestick, etc
 

robthetimekeeper

Senior Member
Why isn't phonetic spelled the way it sounds?

Why isn't "palindrome" spelled the same way backwards as it is forwards?

Why is it so hard to remember how to spell 'mnemonic'?

Is there another word for thesaurus?

Is there another word for synonym?

Why does the word monosyllabic contain five syllables?

Why is abbreviated such a long word?
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member
nerds.....


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:cool::cool::p:p:giggle::giggle::geek::geek:
 
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