Going to School

Coldhardsteel

Gold Member
So, this year is the last year I'm going to be part of the public school system in the United State of America. Honestly it's a little daunting, having this norm gone after thirteen straight years of. Kind of like having the carpet pulled out from under your feet, if you ask me.

At any rate, going to college is beginning to become a real matter to me. For a while, I wasn't interested in college. It was too expensive, too beaurocratic, and not beneficial enough for what I wanted to do with myself. My parents, being teachers, of course would rather I do get into college, for the sake of getting it out of the way mostly- they claim life will get in the way if I don't do it now.

What if college gets in the way of life?

A lot of the big players went to school for music, the same thing I want to do. However, there are plenty who didn't. I know what my ambitions are, but I'm not sure how school could help me reach them if at all, in the short and long term.

Does DW have any advice for a confused young man?
 

Mighty_Joker

Silver Member
It is better to have a college education and regret it than to regret not having one.

EDIT: I very, VERY nearly didn't go to university; I now have a Master's degree in Philosophy. Ironically, this has enabled me to drum professionally now that I've graduated. As you yanks say, "go figure".
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
I guess now most people do/did go to school. When I went- in the 80's- I felt lame for doing it for more than a couple of years. I thought everybody really good was out working.

I think it's a good idea to go while you're still in student mode (and your parents are still in full-on supporting-you mode) and at least make some progress on a degree. Then if you come back to it later you won't have a full four years to slog through. College- and the people in it- can definitely mess with your priorities in a variety of directions- but so can being on your own trying to put together rent money. If you can avoid over-committing to some other career path or "backup plan" people will try to force on you, you'll be fine.

The thing is, you could go for a full four years and get your master's and you'd still be frigging young- like 24, maybe? If you do a couple of years now you may still be under legal drinking age when you get done. So don't sweat it- go get a little college-level music education (and it probably will only be a little), put in some major practice hours, make some contacts, do all the rest of that stuff... just don't get too massively in debt...
 

Toolate

Platinum Member
In addition to learning some book smarts, you will mature as a person and learn vluable lessons about yourself that are much better learned in the controlled, somewhat protected univesity environment.

It will also allow you to fall back on something if, for some reason, you were not able to play music in the future. Better to be more rounded even if it means slightly slowing your pace in other areas.

Probably also get some great gigging experience at parties....
 
M

mediocrefunkybeat

Guest
Wish I could've had funding to do my Masters! I started Uni a couple of years later than my peers and wish I'd started just a little earlier.
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
Are you by chance in a band that writes original music? Are you thinking about putting off college to make a go of it with them?
 

DrumEatDrum

Platinum Member
When I went to college the first time, I felt as you did. I really didn't want to go, but felt I had to. I didn't much care for being there.

I later dropped out, feeling the real word was more educational than I was getting in class.
A few years go by, and the real word is much more cruel than it seems. So I went back to college.

This time I used it to my advantage. I didn't schedule classes for the morning, and not a night. I just went solid from like 11 to 4 or 5pm. This freed my nights for band rehearsal and gigs, and freed my mornings I could sleep in from late night gigs. It was one of the better times in my life, because I was rather focused.

Of course, I thought my band would be signed to a record deal before I graduated, which almost happened, but at least I got degree as a consultation prize.
 

Andy@MIT

Senior Member
When I went to college the first time, I felt as you did. I really didn't want to go, but felt I had to. I didn't much care for being there.

I later dropped out, feeling the real word was more educational than I was getting in class.
A few years go by, and the real word is much more cruel than it seems. So I went back to college.

This time I used it to my advantage. I didn't schedule classes for the morning, and not a night. I just went solid from like 11 to 4 or 5pm. This freed my nights for band rehearsal and gigs, and freed my mornings I could sleep in from late night gigs. It was one of the better times in my life, because I was rather focused.

Of course, I thought my band would be signed to a record deal before I graduated, which almost happened, but at least I got degree as a consultation prize.
I did the same thing. Went for about two years, didn't know what I wanted so I dropped out for about three years. Went back and finished in another two having a little better handle on what I wanted. Then grad school a bit later (as evidenced by my current username).

My advice is that you definitely SHOULD go to college. However, if you postpone for a year or two before enrolling, it is not the end of the world. It is far better to go into it knowing what you want and having the motivation to go and get it, than just to go because it is what you are "supposed" to do. In fact "gap years" where high school grads take a year off to travel / work / etc before attending university are very common in many Western European countries.
 

Neil

Senior Member
Well I didn't go to University, my brother however did, he came out with a massive debt a degree he doesn't make use of and spent the first couple of years after Uni dossing.
His experience put me off going, however I quickly found that not having a University education isn't a hinderence perticuarly in the industry I work in besides I now have the luxury of earning enough money where I can go back and get a degree that's actually relevent now I've settled on my career.
Although there is the very valid arguement that I missed out on a life experience and meeting new people.
 
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