Going Back and Forth Between Half Time and Double Time

?uesto

Silver Member
Hey all, I come with a question.

What do you guys do to transition between double time and half time? I guess it's just half time and standard time or double time and standard. I haven't figured out which one is standard time yet...

But my band has this new tune where the chorus is one tempo, almost played in a punk-rock feel on the drums, and then the bridge and verse is half that tempo in a much more open, spacey and bluesy John Mayer/Pink Floyd feel.

I'd just like some ideas on how to go between the two and lead in and build up or bring down the energy in a more seamless, musical way.

I can upload a rough video of when we first started playing it if needed..

*EDIT*

Then after the second chorus, it's guitar solo time at the same tempo/feel, but then that goes back to half-time and we end..

Thanks
 

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
You can try a fill by alternating the bass drum and the snare and toms by descending from the snare, down the toms, and finally back to the snare for your last hit before the 1 in the measure where the bridge starts. Just a thought.
 

kettles

Gold Member
If the two sections of the song are right next to each other, i.e. you're going straight from chorus to bridge, you can - Do a fill that 'slows down' e.g. two beats of 16ths and two beats of 8ths. I do the same in reverse as well when going from half > normal/double.

Overlap the two sections - so at the end of the chorus (maybe just the last one or two bars), shift to a normal/half time feel. Or play the start of the bridge in the same feel at the chorus. Or just do a big fill that overlaps the barline.

Leave a gap - Try making your last note the '3' of the last bar in the chorus. You could choke a cymbal, hit your snare & floor tom together... up to you. The idea is to have a small space where the groove 'hangs'. You can also put the gap at the start of the bridge, either just the drums, or the whole band, and come back in on the 2nd or 3rd beat. Experiment.

Don't do a transition at all - that'll make the new time feel unexpected, it'll be like a surprise. I do this a lot, I don't like to spoon feed the listener with obvious transitions all the time.
 

?uesto

Silver Member
If the two sections of the song are right next to each other, i.e. you're going straight from chorus to bridge, you can - Do a fill that 'slows down' e.g. two beats of 16ths and two beats of 8ths. I do the same in reverse as well when going from half > normal/double.

Overlap the two sections - so at the end of the chorus (maybe just the last one or two bars), shift to a normal/half time feel. Or play the start of the bridge in the same feel at the chorus. Or just do a big fill that overlaps the barline.

Leave a gap - Try making your last note the '3' of the last bar in the chorus. You could choke a cymbal, hit your snare & floor tom together... up to you. The idea is to have a small space where the groove 'hangs'. You can also put the gap at the start of the bridge, either just the drums, or the whole band, and come back in on the 2nd or 3rd beat. Experiment.

Don't do a transition at all - that'll make the new time feel unexpected, it'll be like a surprise. I do this a lot, I don't like to spoon feed the listener with obvious transitions all the time.
These are some great ideas. We'll have to get a good drumless recording so I can mess with these ideas not on my band's time. JJ Johnson has a few great transitions like this with John Mayer, but it suits that music more than this.

One thing I do that I'm trying to perfect is pop the hi-hat on the up-beats leading into chorus since I play open hi-hats there, so it almost builds it up. I may just lead into it by playing the hat with my left hand and open the hats slowly...

I'm going to mess with some of these next rehearsal though. Thanks!
 
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