Go-to material for Latin applications in Jazz?

Spreggy

Silver Member
I'd like to pull together a shortlist of latin-flavored jazz essentials.
Drummers/albums listening list?
Education essentials on how to apply latin ideas, etc?
 

Mr Farkle

Well-known Member
@toddbishop has a good listening list in his great little book “Playing Samba and Bossa Nova”. The book is also a good primer for the genre, if that’s what you mean by education essentials. I’m able to cover 95% of the Latin songs we play in our band using that material. Perfect minimalistic survival guide.

 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Diamond Member
@toddbishop has a good listening list in his great little book “Playing Samba and Bossa Nova”. The book is also a good primer for the genre, if that’s what you mean by education essentials. I’m able to cover 95% of the Latin songs we play in our band using that material. Perfect minimalistic survival guide.


will be checking out Todd's book for sure!!!
 

jda

Silver Member
Elvin
Love Supreme, Pt.1
Elvin Jones- Lp Mr. Jones

he always puts one or two thru his recorded career
Sambra-from Live At The Lighthouse
 
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Huw Owens

Active Member
Learn to play both a 2:3 clave, & a 3:2 clave. That, plus playing either just the 3 side of just the 2 side, gives you enough to fake 90% of situations.

Play a backbeat with 2 as a rim click & 4 on a tom, now it's 95%.

Surface barely scratched, & definitely check out the books mentioned, but the above fits nearly all the charts I get given for either big band or small combo jazz.

And sometimes Latin is just shorthand for "don't swing" ;)
 

jda

Silver Member
Here's one (listen/imitate) that will get a rock guy in-quick..


it's almost/ Jethro Tull ": nothing is Easy".. similar.
 

jda

Silver Member
(yea sorry bout that.
late last night I rediscovered it in my cd collection and..
 

jda

Silver Member
and )it's not (solely "latin" was recognized as World Music
and it was 1969 (in Paris) I don't know what Ride cymbal Ed was using (but sounds like the one all thru the Ornette Coleman albums; early 60s) kind of a 20" light hi pitch brand unknown
"Mu was one of the first efforts in what would come to be known as world music.[5]
They announced a new, world-embracing esthetic for jazz, for while they included improvising in a Coleman-inspired vein, they also reached out to include rhythm patterns, scales and instruments from Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Pacific."[6]"
everything from bright New Orleans vamps and marches to African songs, folksy Americana to totally free passages."[
 
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