Give feedback on my band please

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Good effort. However, you both need to state the time much better. The tunes have to feel solid or it just sounds wrong. Perhaps having access to a drum machine to practice your grooves along with to start?
 

GingerBakerJr

Junior Member
Well you're sounding okay, I'm just going to state my opinion, no offense meant. I'm not sure what kind of band you're looking to become but you need to bulk up the groove and add a bassist, or if you want to keep it a two piece then amplify your drums a little more because it was hard to hear you alot of the time. You're guitarist seems pretty good so you don't have to throw down anything fancy, but louder. Also work on your timing with a metronome as a couple times the transitioning from one part to the next got off the beat a bit.

How long have you been playing for? Good luck with your future aspirations, good to see more Canadian drummers on here!

Oh, and of course, keep it fun, looks like you guys are already having a good time though
 
Well you're sounding okay, I'm just going to state my opinion, no offense meant. I'm not sure what kind of band you're looking to become but you need to bulk up the groove and add a bassist, or if you want to keep it a two piece then amplify your drums a little more because it was hard to hear you alot of the time. You're guitarist seems pretty good so you don't have to throw down anything fancy, but louder. Also work on your timing with a metronome as a couple times the transitioning from one part to the next got off the beat a bit.

How long have you been playing for? Good luck with your future aspirations, good to see more Canadian drummers on here!

Oh, and of course, keep it fun, looks like you guys are already having a good time though
Thanks for the comments, we are actually going to have a bassist soon and as for the volume i completely agree. My band is trying to play every type of music because both of us are huge fans of all music. As for my timing your right but i haven't been playing drums for a year yet.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Thanks for the comments, we are actually going to have a bassist soon and as for the volume i completely agree. My band is trying to play every type of music because both of us are huge fans of all music. As for my timing your right but i haven't been playing drums for a year yet.
OK. I understand you haven't been playing that long. However, timing shouldn't be something you begin to take seriously after so many years playing. It's part of the whole package, and for most drummers, it is the package. Chops are useless if you can't execute things in time. This could easily be improved by practicing your snare drum exercises with a metronome, and then learning how to groove along to a metronome. When I was a kid, I spent hours grooving along to songs on the radio or whatever records my parents had - and over time I realized I was practicing things in time because that's a characteristic of all recordings ever released.
 
W

wy yung

Guest
Okay I have had a listen. I am keeping in mind your short time playing.

Our function within an ensemble is very clear. Drummers are time keepers. So that is a vitally important area and it needs our proper care and attention.

Like most people new to the kit you are having trouble manipulating your limbs and keeping it all together. This is perfectly normal and is nothing to be concerned about. However, in the beginning of our playing days we are teaching our muscles to memorize specific movements. And playing in time with accuracy is indeed a muscle memory. If you have spent a year not working with a metronome you have been teaching your body to play out of time. This is an error that requires addressing.

As I have done many times here I will recommend you practice slowly with a click track. Learn the spaces between the notes. Do this with individual limbs, two limbs, three etc. It can seem boring at first not playing along with your favorite recordings. But it must be done. Practice is not play time for us to mess around. We all need to use our time to gain the maximum benefit.

How to practice: Practice time can be divided into different categories during our alloted time. We will use 2 hours as our example here.

We can begin with hand technique practice on a pad. Many books and DVDs can help and guide you in the right direction. My two favorites are the classic Stick Control by George Lawrence Stone and Master Studies Part 1 by the remarkable Joe Morello. Working through these books with a click track has proven positive results. 30 minutes before the rest of your session doing this will greatly help you. You can change the tempo from slow to fast and back again every 5 minutes.

On the kit: Now you can work on moving your limbs around the kit using the techniques you used on the pad. Again slowly and with a metronome. Use different limbs to play assigned notes. For example exercise 5 on page one of Stick Control can be played with the left hand as the bass drum and the right as the hand and visa versa. This can be done with all the exercises in that great book. Focus on landing your notes with accuracy. You can again do this for half an hour.

We can next work on playing time, i.e grooves we have learned. begin slowly and concentrate on where your notes are landing. Do this will all the grooves you know and those you are trying to learn. It is interesting to play something slowly, then fast and return to an even slower tempo from where we began. It really does help us see where we need to improve.

The last half hour can be spent just having fun. Playing along to recordings, trying to play a solo, anything.

And record yourself and listen back to it later.

I hope this is of some help to you.

Good luck.
 
W

wy yung

Guest
Okay I have had a listen. I am keeping in mind your short time playing.

Our function within an ensemble is very clear. Drummers are time keepers. So that is a vitally important area and it needs our proper care and attention.

Like most people new to the kit you are having trouble manipulating your limbs and keeping it all together. This is perfectly normal and is nothing to be concerned about. However, in the beginning of our playing days we are teaching our muscles to memorize specific movements. And playing in time with accuracy is indeed a muscle memory. If you have spent a year not working with a metronome you have been teaching your body to play out of time. This is an error that requires addressing.

As I have done many times here I will recommend you practice slowly with a click track. Learn the spaces between the notes. Do this with individual limbs, two limbs, three etc. It can seem boring at first not playing along with your favorite recordings. But it must be done. Practice is not play time for us to mess around. We all need to use our time to gain the maximum benefit.

How to practice: Practice time can be divided into different categories during our alloted time. We will use 2 hours as our example here.

We can begin with hand technique practice on a pad. Many books and DVDs can help and guide you in the right direction. My two favorites are the classic Stick Control by George Lawrence Stone and Master studies Part 1 by the remarkable Joe Morello. Working through these books with a click tract has proven positive results. 30 minutes before the rest of your session doing this will greatly help you. You can change the tempo from slow to fast and back again every 5 minutes.

On the kit: Now you can work on moving your limbs around the kit using the techniques you used on the pad. Again slowly and with a metronome. Use different limbs to play assigned notes. For example exercise 5 on page one of Stick Control can be played with the left hand as the bass drum and the right as the hand and visa versa. This can be done with all the exercises in that great book. Focus on landing your notes with accuracy. You can again do this for half an hour.

We can next work on playing time, i.e grooves we have learned. begin slowly and concentrate on where your notes are landing. Do this will all the grooves you know and those you are trying to learn. It is interesting to play something slowly, then fast and return to an even slower tempo from where we began. It really does help us see where we need to improve.

The last half hour can be spent just having fun. Playing along to recordings, trying to play a solo, anything.

And record yourself and listen back to it later.

I hope this is of some help to you.

Good luck.
 
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