GIO Cymbals?

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
Just saw this. They certainly put an emphasis on beating the crap outta these things. Not much else though. Thoughts? Opinions? Experiences?

At least they look like cymbals.

 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
The Craigslist angle is a little unprofessional for a 'company', but there is a web site listed:
https://gioshoprocks.com Go to Shop>Gio Cymbals

Is it me, or are they kinda expensive??

Bermuda
 

TK-421

Senior Member
They tout heavier weights and bigger bells to withstand heavy pounding. But I've been under the impression that thinner cymbals are actually harder to break since they flex considerably more and absorb hits much better than their thicker counterparts, which tend to be much stiffer and less able to absorb hard hits. I've been playing Ks for decades—always with thin crashes, not medium-thin—and I hit reasonably hard when playing rock. I've never cracked one.
 
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Pass.of.E.r.a.

Gold Member
They tout heavier weights and bigger bells to withstand heavy pounding. But I've been under the impression that thinner cymbals are actually harder to break since they flex considerably more and absorb hits much better than their thicker counterparts, which tend to be much stiffer and less able to absorb hard hits. I've been playing Ks for decades—always with thin crashes, not medium-thin—and I hit reasonably hard when playing rock. I've never cracked one.
I've broken every kind of thickness there is. I think it depends on technique to a point and then the velocity that's used.

The Craigslist angle is a little unprofessional for a 'company', but there is a web site listed:
https://gioshoprocks.com Go to Shop>Gio Cymbals

Is it me, or are they kinda expensive??

Bermuda
Unreasonably high considering they don't make anything in-house. The 00's were home to the "custom kits" that were all the same keller shells, painted in weird finishes and asking exorbitant prices that don't reflect the quality or actual value of the drum. (Truth, SJC, Shine, any other kit that was featured prominently in warped tour). The 10's/20's look like they'll be home to the cymbal equivalent of that. Only nothing gets a fancy coat of paint this time around.

What'll be next.

-Jonathan
 
Prices seem pretty fair for hand hammered B20 Turkish pieces, even if he is trying to make a profit. Advertising/company image could def use some help though imo. It would be nice if they listed the factory that produces them.
 
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I remember Nort Hargrove from Sabian saying, that it is a missunderstanding that heavier cymbals don't break as fast as thinner cymbals do. Due to elasticity they in fact absorb more energy than thicker cymbals and don't brake as easily if properly hit. Plus, crashes and chinas tend to be rather loud in the mix, and if you have to play crashes the hardest you can in order to achieve a useful crash sound, you won't be able to reduce this phenomenon to a certain extent if needed.

My best wishesfor the company, but I wouldn't say there's a need for such a cymbal line on the market since heavy hitters find all they might need from countless other companies.
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
Prices seem pretty fair for hand hammered B20 Turkish pieces, even if he isn't trying to make a profit... It would be nice if they listed the factory that produces them.
While it would be interesting to know which brands come from which foundries, that knowledge could be as damaging as helpful to the particular company. Suppose you disliked an independent brand, and then learned that the Gio cymbals were made in the same building by the same people. You would likely avoid the Gio (even if they were made to be significantly different.) Same for a brand you like, only to discovered that the Gio did not live up to the other brand made in the same place. It's better to judge a product based on its merits, rather than a perceived association or pedigree. The problem with cymbals is that until you can actually hear and play them, you don't know what you're getting until you've spent a lot of money.

As for profits, if he sells a cymbal, he's making money. I think those prices are high considering he doesn't have any real marketing expenses. Craigslist costs nothing, and his cymbal and personal sites cost very little.

As C.T.Dummy pointed out, there are countless other companies already, big and small. I don't see how Gio is really filling a need here.

Bermuda
 
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