Ginger Baker sound

Drewbrew

Member
Hey guys I am a huge Cream fan and especially a fan of Ginger Baker. To me the sound of his drums are the best in the world. I was wondering what a good drum set would be to replicate that sound and that classic ludwig sound i suppose
 

GruntersDad

Administrator - Mayor
Staff member
His drums, his mics, his EQ, his amplifier, etc etc etc. why not be famous and make your own sound
 
A

audiotech

Guest
It's easy. Just get his drums, drum tech and sound crew. While your at it, just get Ginger Baker.

GRUNTERSDAD is correct. Just be your own person, then maybe someday Ginger Baker will post somewhere inquiring how to get Drewbrew's sound.

Dennis
 

drumtechdad

Gold Member
I love Ginger Baker, God bless 'im, I played along with Cream records when they were new . . . but I never heard anyone admire his sound.

Get old 3-ply Luddies, take the bottom heads off of all the toms, then take the reso off the bass drum and stuff a blanket in it. (He used resos live, but I'd bet he didn't in the studio.) Tune low.

That 70s sound we all covet. ;-)
 

volvoguy

Senior Member
I don't think Ginger Baker had has sound when playing with Cream. So much of that "sound" comes from what you can't hear because because the guitar and bass were so loud. :)

Though Ludwig Classics in old school sizes will get you part way there.

-Ryan
 

RollingStone000

Silver Member
I don't think Ginger Baker had has sound when playing with Cream. So much of that "sound" comes from what you can't hear because because the guitar and bass were so loud. :)

Though Ludwig Classics in old school sizes will get you part way there.

-Ryan
That's a really good point, and if you think about when they'd play live, all of the sound was just getting shot out from the stage. Those drums were probably as open sounding as you could get them. No monitors or EQing... nothing. It also wasn't uncommon for Clapton's or Bruce's amp to just crap in the middle of a set, you've got a push an amp damn hard to fry it. Poor Ginger, He'd have to tape up his hands so he could hit hard enough night after night, not to mention sitting in between two of the biggest amp setups of the time. I've got a great documentary on them, and he was saying the last tour they did, the sound from the amps would be so loud his ears would be ringing non-stop along with constant head aches. Then again they were always loud, Disraeli Gears was probably the loudest album Atlantic has ever recorded.
 

Strangelove

Gold Member
I don't think you necessarily need the vintage set - maybe just the larger drum sizes, like he used. But there's a few things you should be aware of. Mr Baker's influences were the big band drummers, and he likely tuned his set like they did, which is much higher than drummers today tune. I am not familiar with his particular sound and am too lazy to put on any old Cream songs right now, but you might just try this approach: Try sticking to Remo Ambassadors and maybe Emperors on the floor tom batters. I would start by tuning all the tom batters a full turn tighter than wrinkle (remember the golden rule when dealing with Remos, however). Next tune all your resos a full turn to a full turn and a half tighter than the batters. Use moon gel on the batters to compensate for any excessive ring (back in the day, we used the individual mufflers). Evans Emad batters or their equivalents on the bass drums should probably come close enough to the manually baffled batter heads of yesteryear. Tune the batter fairly tight, with the reso loose and get a good tone with good beater rebound. Then tighten the reso 1/4 per lug at a time until you get a good distinct, but resonant boom. If it resonates too long, then you need to back off until you get it just right. On the snare, just try to tune it accordingly, again with Remo heads.
 

Les Ismore

Platinum Member
I don't think Ginger Baker had has sound when playing with Cream. So much of that "sound" comes from what you can't hear because because the guitar and bass were so loud. :)

Though Ludwig Classics in old school sizes will get you part way there.

-Ryan

....... this is true and the b/c of the early recording gear.

Baker's drum sound w/Blind faith- @ 5:20 of this vid http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aAv5FHXN354&feature=related
 

mrmike

Silver Member
When I think of Gingers sound with Cream I also think of Mitch Mitchel and Clive Bunker, jazz guys playing rock. I say crank those heads up tight and let em ring!

Of course Gingers sound of today is nothing like his sound of yesteryear.
 

Cypriss

Senior Member
His DW kit on the live at the royal albert hall just sounds so good.great playing back in the days but am not a big fan of the sound.
 

criz p. critter

Silver Member
Leaving aside the question of whether or not Drewbrew should sound like someone else...

I had to chip in here with another vote for Baker's sound. Especially the two different notes he tuned his kicks to. Given the time those Cream records were recorded, the way guys like him and Bonham and Moon were tuning their drums, what's wrong with the way his drums sounded?
 

volvoguy

Senior Member
The irony, of course, is that to borrow elements from Ginger Baker's sound from the 1960's likely would make you sound unique among today's "sound". All the kids sound the same today. All the kids borrow. Few know their roots.

-Ryan
 

Bonzodownunder

Senior Member
I'm extremely&very very very confused!,
His website lists mentions says&tells me that during the Cream period '66-68,
As well as 'Wiki" that he used 13&14" crashes,
But/yet on his own website under "drummers" &"gear" it only lists mentions&says "16 17 18" crashes",
SO WHAT SITE/WHO'S Correct?!.
 

opentune

Platinum Member
Wow a thread from the dead!
Best way is to not believe Wiki or anybody. Google images of him in Cream. You can see all his setup of cymbals and estimate sizes etc. (they are in no way 13 14 crashes). Also many YouTubes show the setup.
He had a famous Zil A 22 ride with rivets.
I have read in his autobio he still uses the same cymbals with Cream throughout his career.
 
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