Gigging Sets: New vs Vintage

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
The only vintage kit I have is a 70's Pearl Wood-Fiberglass kit. I will be gigging with it this weekend actually. The old hex tom arms are not ideal for positioning but they are solid. Luckily by then they were using a solid spur design so that's not an issue.
I have the same kit. I would also have no issues gigging it if I still did that. However, I'd rather gig the Midtown's for ease of transport and shock factor.
 

bearblastbeats

Senior Member
I gig the old Luddy for many years. When I took it from my dad's storage, I modernized it. I have a thread on here for all the work I did to it before him passing. The kit was AWESOME for the music I was into then.

I updated the supra recently and still use that as my main snare. It's my only snare.

Gigging the yamaha is great because its smaller sizes, and in soft cases I can carry all the drums in on trip. I got it in white, which is nice looking but I am board and am thinking of wrapping it in the Black Oyster Pearl from Walopus.

Either that, or find a 70's 3 ply luddy in the sizes I use, or buy them new?
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
and they are real simple...straight, with a big point on the end. like a lawn dart without the big wings. They grip everything I put them on. Slide right into the shell...no problem
To me, the spurs are the weak link in the looks department. I don't like the look of spurs that are too small and don't have the rubber feet on the end. With that said, I'm a total hypocrite because while all of my drum spurs have the rubber feet on them, I always screw them back up to the point where the spikes dig down in my carpet. A buddy of mine who owns several vintage kits says that NONE of his spurs slip or fail. Ever. I'm glad they work well.
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
To me, the spurs are the weak link in the looks department. I don't like the look of spurs that are too small and don't have the rubber feet on the end. With that said, I'm a total hypocrite because while all of my drum spurs have the rubber feet on them, I always screw them back up to the point where the spikes dig down in my carpet. A buddy of mine who owns several vintage kits says that NONE of his spurs slip or fail. Ever. I'm glad they work well.
I think they work so well b/c they are not over engineered. There is only one part to fail...the wing nut. The spurs on my 94 Pearl are great for the most part, but there are 3 places that come loose while playing. And the rubber parts that you screw to get out of the way are so big that even screwed all the way up, they don't allow the point to truly make contact with the carpet.
 

danondrums

Well-known member
If 90's in considered vintage, then vintage is all I play... Lol.
All I really care about on a gigging kit is the condition of the hardware. Sure, tone matters, but it's a given that you can achieve a good tone on any aged drum set, so then it's just reliability that I care about when gigging.
 

IBitePrettyHard

Senior Member
New gear is definitely better than Vintage gear from a practical and reliability standpoint. There's no denying that. All my vintage drums and hardware have some sort of quirk to contend with.

New hardware is superior in almost every way.

Except weight. :LOL:
 

justadrummer

Junior Member
New gear is definitely better than Vintage gear from a practical and reliability standpoint. There's no denying that. All my vintage drums and hardware have some sort of quirk to contend with.

New hardware is superior in almost every way.

Except weight. :LOL:
I use DW ultralight 6000 hardware for most gigs these days, so it is better weight-wise as well.
 

bearblastbeats

Senior Member
New gear is definitely better than Vintage gear from a practical and reliability standpoint. There's no denying that. All my vintage drums and hardware have some sort of quirk to contend with.

New hardware is superior in almost every way.

Except weight. :LOL:
I've been using the yamaha 700 series hardware, single braces even, and its held up really well for the past 5 years.
 

RickP

Gold Member
Yep, I just got the DW Ultralight hardware set less than a week ago. Haven't had a chance to gig with them, but really looking forward to it. My original hardware bag weighed about 55-65 lbs!
I had the DW ultralight hardware pack - be very careful with the memory locks . I snapped the the tension rod heads off the snare stand and hihat stand the first time I attempted to adjust them . The hihat stand will wobble a lot when played forcefully . The cymbal stands need the bases weighed down if you are playing outdoor gigs with even a moderate wind .
 
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