Getting ear impressions for IEM

veecharlie

Senior Member
Hey drummers!

I have made the step. I ordered CIEM from Alclair, which I can't wait that they arrive.
At first, I was scared of the process but then I just launched me in. LOL

I'm wondering how happy are you with your Alclair IEM and how long did it take since the day they received the ear impressions?

By the way, I have made a vlog documenting that day:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e1l53yGVQA8
 

KEEF

Senior Member
Can't vouch for Aclair - but i will say CIEM's are worth every penny! Be patient with them though.The added isolation - which is great for protecting your hearing - does take some getting used to.
Once you have your mix dialled in you will love them!
 

bgood

Member
I had a set of Westone CIEM done for me, took about 4 weeks. I like the isolation and they sound really good. Slight bit of hiss from them when plugged into my Tascam DP24 supposedly due to an impedance mismatch. It goes away when I use a headphone amp. Good hearing protection for practice time.
 

Bo Eder

Platinum Member
Ultimate Ears came to my workplace (Disneyland) and did the fitting, then they took two weeks to build them and ship them to me overnight. I love the IEM's, but I'm finding out that I can't use them all the time - IEM's are really the best when everybody is on them, and everything is mic'ed up and going through the system. If I'm the only one with them, and I take an AUX output to hear the vocals only, then that's all I'll hear because nothing else is going through the AUX output. IEM's don't really allow for outside sounds to come in.

But I do look really cool when I wear them with my iPod on a plane ;)
 

dboomer

Senior Member
I had a set of Westone CIEM done for me, took about 4 weeks. I like the isolation and they sound really good. Slight bit of hiss from them when plugged into my Tascam DP24 supposedly due to an impedance mismatch. It goes away when I use a headphone amp. Good hearing protection for practice time.
An impedance mismatch wouldn’t cause hiss. You need to check your gain structure as that is almost the singular cause of hiss in a system.
 

KEEF

Senior Member
An impedance mismatch wouldn’t cause hiss. You need to check your gain structure as that is almost the singular cause of hiss in a system.
dboomer - Could i trouble you to explain 'gain structure' in laymans terms please?

I get interference/hiss through my IEM's all the time. I have an aux out send from our digital desk into a headphone amp. The headphone amp sits in a rack case on top of a dmx light controller - i always assumed this was causing it.
It's not debilitating but i'd love to cure it.
Thanks in advance.
 

dboomer

Senior Member
Every piece of electronic gear makes some amount of noise as well as being able to output some higher level of output before it goes into distortion. The distance between that noise and the beginning of distortion is called "dynamic range". So you have a noise "floor" and an output "ceiling". The closer you can operate to the ceiling will keep you further away from the floor. As you turn down you naturally get closer to the noise floor and will hear more 'hiss".

So when you run through multiple pieces of gear you can minimize the system hiss by maintaining the proper gain structure. The way you do this is to run each piece in the chain at its maximum output without ever going into distortion. some people mistakingly think this has something to do with "unity gain" but it only does in a completely calibrated system.

So if we only consider a mixer driving an amplifier if you run the mixer hot and the amp turned down you will experience less hiss than if you turn the mixer down some and the amp up some. either way you would still get the same power output from the amp, but with proper gain structure you will get less hiss.

Now your problem may be interference from your dmx system ... but interference is different from "hiss" which is a gain structure issue. The simple test is to turn off the dmx and see if the noise goes away.
 

Odd-Arne Oseberg

Platinum Member
If I'm the only one with them, and I take an AUX output to hear the vocals only, then that's all I'll hear because nothing else is going through the AUX output. IEM's don't really allow for outside sounds to come in.
Quite a few companies make IEM's with built in mics now where you can blend in your surroundings to the level you want.
 

Mastiff

Senior Member
I have Alclairs and like them a lot. I do still eventually get ear fatigue, but it takes much longer than with non-fitted ear canal ear buds. Headphones, of course, eventually start to crush your head, so you can't ever totally win. I use mine for practicing only and listen to the drums just through the isolation (no mics). I think it works fine, and doesn't cause that bass enhancing resonance thing like headphones. Plus, I can wear glasses without the isolation being destroyed.

In terms of passive isolation, the only issue is sometimes they are too effective against the bass drum when playing with music. Higher pitched things are great. Someday I'll mic my drums just for practicing so everything will be dialed in.

It takes a little practice to be able to put them in and out quickly, but you'll figure that out. Highly recommended.
 

KEEF

Senior Member
Every piece of electronic gear makes some amount of noise as well as being able to output some higher level of output before it goes into distortion. The distance between that noise and the beginning of distortion is called "dynamic range". So you have a noise "floor" and an output "ceiling". The closer you can operate to the ceiling will keep you further away from the floor. As you turn down you naturally get closer to the noise floor and will hear more 'hiss".

So when you run through multiple pieces of gear you can minimize the system hiss by maintaining the proper gain structure. The way you do this is to run each piece in the chain at its maximum output without ever going into distortion. some people mistakingly think this has something to do with "unity gain" but it only does in a completely calibrated system.

So if we only consider a mixer driving an amplifier if you run the mixer hot and the amp turned down you will experience less hiss than if you turn the mixer down some and the amp up some. either way you would still get the same power output from the amp, but with proper gain structure you will get less hiss.

Now your problem may be interference from your dmx system ... but interference is different from "hiss" which is a gain structure issue. The simple test is to turn off the dmx and see if the noise goes away.
Thanks my friend - really appreciate your advice
 

konaboy

Pioneer Member
I have a set of Alclair CMVK (5 driver) and absolutely love them. Think it was about 4 weeks total from when I sent the impression to when they showed up on my door step. Absolutely fantastic company to deal with! Fits great and the sound is amazing! It's a different experience than using universals, took me a few times wearing to get used to how different the sound is (insanely better) and the isolation they give. You'll be happy, on of THE best music investments you can make ;-)
 
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