Getting a scholarship at Berklee?

David Floegel

Silver Member
Hi,

ok, as you can see in the title, I'm interested in getting a scholarship at the Berklee univserity. (in 2 years, when my trainingship is done)
Most people will now think "haha well - good luck.. you'll never get it" but that's ok, I'm pretty sure that the chances to get a scholarship are pretty low.. (4000 applications each year)


I've got a few questions and I hope some people will be able to answer them:
-1- how does the application work?
I read on the page that an audition and interview is required - since I'm from germany that might be a bit difficult :) If they would invite me, I would fly there but of course a video chat and video performance would be a lot easier (and cheaper), haha.

-2- what is required for the audition? what do they want to see? Solo performances? Band/Playalong? Or is it like "ok, here's a sheet music and a snare drum solo, play it, now!" (last would be horrible..)

-3- Differences between full tuition and only a bit tuition (don't know the word..):
I'm sure there will be huge differences in getting a full tuition and only getting a bit money for your education at berklee. Does somebody of you know where the differences are?


Thanks for your answers in advance!!
It would be a dream to study at berklee, or if berklee doesn't want me an other university in america.. I just can't afford 60.000$ per year :p


All the best!
David
 

Ami

Senior Member
When I was checking out schools in the states and auditioned for them, they wanted an applicant who could play well in a bunch of jazz styles, (and other styles if possible) sightread, play with a band, and have a harmony and theory background. The closer to a pro level player you are, the better your chances.

Since you mention other Uni's, I recommend you check out UNT. Since it is a state school, the tuition is much lower, and if you get a scholarship, tuition will probably be affordable. ("in state"). The School is really amazing and you will learn a lot and probably have a very positive experience. If you will be lucky enough to study with the great Ed Soph, even better...
 
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Anthony Amodeo

Guest
a couple of my past students now attend Berklee

one on scholarship

for the audition they played a prepared piece, did some sight reading, played through some styles, answered some theory questions, then went through an interview process

as far as the prepared piece ...one of my students did a jazz play along , and the other prepared a Gavin Harrison piece ... recreating the backing track himself then played along to that

they both just finished their first year and seem to love it

I don't know the details as far as tuition
 

Shirai

Member
I don't know anything about Berklee's audition process or scholarship structure, but you may also want to consider Belmont University in Nashville. It's expensive, but not as expensive as Berklee, and is one of the few schools in the US that has a music program focused on commercial styles. Chester Thompson heads up the drum department there, and Nashville is a good town to build connections in if you're interested in a career in music.
 
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Anthony Amodeo

Guest
I don't know anything about Berklee's audition process or scholarship structure, but you may also want to consider Belmont University in Nashville. It's expensive, but not as expensive as Berklee, and is one of the few schools in the US that has a music program focused on commercial styles. Chester Thompson heads up the drum department there, and Nashville is a good town to build connections in if you're interested in a career in music.
absolutely

Nashville is one of the few heavily fertile living music scene cities left in the country
 

tamadrm

Platinum Member
I just took a look at Berklees' website,and the tuition isn't as much as I thought it would be.It varies between 13,000 and 17,700 not including additional fees,computer(mandatory),and books.Compared with Julliard,which is.........wait for it.................over 51,000 for a double dorm room,not including other fees,which can total around 10,000.Thats US dollars.

One of my former boy scouts graduated from Julliard,and is an amazing pianist.He's now working on Wall street.A shame really.

Steve B
 
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David Floegel

Silver Member
I just took a look at Berklees' website,and the tuition isn't as much as I thought it would be.It varies between 13,000 and 17,700 not including additional fees,computer(mandatory),and books.

Steve B
Right.. that's why I would need a presidential scholarship..


Thanks all for your answers!


@Shirai and Ami: I will definitely check the uni you named, sounds interesting!


Thanks again! :)
 

Numberless

Platinum Member
As long as you audition you're always considered for a scholarship. I know great musicians that have auditioned and have received 20,000 to 40,000 which is a decent amount. The presidential scholarship is given to like five people each years, basically students who are already pretty much amazing, it's highly competitive so be sure to know what you're in for.

I think at this point you should be working with a teacher who will prep you for a succesful audition. In Berklee's page you can find all the info on the audition requirements.
 

pieplaysdrums

Senior Member
Find out when Berklee is doing the "World Scholarship Tour" in/near your area. They send teachers and reps all over the world to audition new students for admission and scholarship. If you'd like to know what type get the handful of full-boat scholarships each year out of thousands of applicants, check out Esperanza Spaulding. Make that your goal of course, but also be realistic as to where you are and prepare yourself to be as impressive as you can be based on tangible real-world goals. All the best to you in your endeavors!
 

David Floegel

Silver Member
Hi,

I know it will be a hard competitive and I think the chances to get a presidential is pretty hard...
But it's more than just a dream to study at Berklee - but We won't be able to afford (even) 2000$ a month..

I guess working with a teacher might be a good idea, even though I will habe to find somebody who's pretty amazing! Not easy in my location..


Anyhow, i checked some videos on the berklee website of people who got the presidential scholarship and I don't think they were that good? I heard them playing in a little clip with a little bit of talking. They all had a nice groove and stuff but not sooo amazing that many people I know couldn't do that..


Thank you for your wishes pieplaysdrums :)
 

dale w miller

Silver Member
I just took a look at Berklees' website,and the tuition isn't as much as I thought it would be.It varies between 13,000 and 17,700 not including additional fees,computer(mandatory),and books.Compared with Julliard,which is.........wait for it.................over 51,000 for a double dorm room,not including other fees,which can total around 10,000.Thats US dollars.

One of my former boy scouts graduated from Julliard,and is an amazing pianist.He's now working on Wall street.A shame really.

Steve B
I think that is off. http://www.berklee.edu/financial-aid/cost-of-attendance.html/

I heard it was out of control since I left and people are not kidding. When I went in the mid 90's it was $7000 a semester plus my rent as I lived with my band. I could NEVER afford to go now or send my kids.
 

pieplaysdrums

Senior Member
Aim high Kalma! Also, you are in Germany and therefor in Europe, which means you have access to GREAT public transportation. If you are serious, then there's no reason why you aren't beating down Benny Greb's door in Hamburg. I'm not kidding. Make your dream happen! Sacrifice. Good luck!
 

David Floegel

Silver Member
I think that is off. http://www.berklee.edu/financial-aid/cost-of-attendance.html/

I heard it was out of control since I left and people are not kidding. When I went in the mid 90's it was $7000 a semester plus my rent as I lived with my band. I could NEVER afford to go now or send my kids.
Wow 7000$ a semester are still 1166$ a month.. But you're right, today it's much more expensive..
And, yeah, I guess most people can't afford it..


pieplaysdrums said:
Aim high Kalma! Also, you are in Germany and therefor in Europe, which means you have access to GREAT public transportation. If you are serious, then there's no reason why you aren't beating down Benny Greb's door in Hamburg. I'm not kidding. Make your dream happen! Sacrifice. Good luck!
Haha, right, Germany offers some good public transportation but Hamburg is still far :p Well, 2 1/2 hour by train but it's expensive as well 56€/way.
But I really consider doing that, I mean, there's some time left (about 1 1/2 year) and I think my playing will develop a lot in that time but I'm sure someone like Benny Greb could help me to really amaze those people..


Thanks for your answers :)
 

Talismanis

Senior Member
I'd say go for Berklee if it's what you want to do - but if you don't get in, it's not the end of your drumming career. Honestly, I'm very sceptical of how good that college is supposed to be. I am by no means a master drummer and would never claim to be, but from what I've seen (literally just youtube videos - someone please correct me if I'm talking completely out of line there) there is absolutely nothing special you couldn't learn from a good local teacher and some good practice time yourself. I get the feeling a lot of people want to go there because of its fame, it reminds me of the Brit School in the UK (famous for producing wave after wave of generic self-important pop artist clones who aren't really anything special).

THEN AGAIN, if you do get in, I can't imagine it'd do you any harm, and being able to practice so much will only work wonders for your drumming. Despite my criticisms, you'd definitely be a good drummer after Berklee - I just don't believe that the mystical "Berklee chops" are anything that special.
 

Numberless

Platinum Member
I agree with you that you don't need to go to Berklee to be a good drummer, I think the real value of a college like Berklee is the sheer amount of people you will meet. You can do some crazy networking in the time you're there, basically meeting musicians from all over the world, now the question is if that's worth the huge tuition. I'm hoping to get a masters from the new Valencia campus, I'm of course looking around at other colleges but Valencia's my 1 pick for that reason, networking.
 
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Anthony Amodeo

Guest
I'd say go for Berklee if it's what you want to do - but if you don't get in, it's not the end of your drumming career. Honestly, I'm very sceptical of how good that college is supposed to be. I am by no means a master drummer and would never claim to be, but from what I've seen (literally just youtube videos - someone please correct me if I'm talking completely out of line there) there is absolutely nothing special you couldn't learn from a good local teacher and some good practice time yourself. I get the feeling a lot of people want to go there because of its fame, it reminds me of the Brit School in the UK (famous for producing wave after wave of generic self-important pop artist clones who aren't really anything special).

THEN AGAIN, if you do get in, I can't imagine it'd do you any harm, and being able to practice so much will only work wonders for your drumming. Despite my criticisms, you'd definitely be a good drummer after Berklee - I just don't believe that the mystical "Berklee chops" are anything that special.

so a renowned school that happens to be the largest independent college of contemporary music in the world is nothing special?

hmmmm
 

Talismanis

Senior Member
so a renowned school that happens to be the largest independent college of contemporary music in the world is nothing special?

hmmmm
Like I said, I might have the wrong idea - I did say someone correct me if I'm being completely out of line. Music education is a good thing, I don't mean to slate Berklee. But if you're dedicated and know fundamental music theory (both for drums and harmony/everythingelseingeneral), have a good teacher, and practice regularly, then you'll still be pretty good.
You may not be able to play everything a music college guy can play - but you'll have the ability to learn it (as in, you can't play soandso lick because you don't know it and haven't practiced it, not because you don't have the chops or musicality). You learn an awful lot by just going out and playing, as well; join the local brass band, go to open jazz nights, join a drumline, play in a school production of a musical, take all the opportunities you can get, and yes to be fair Berklee of course counts as an opportunity haha.

Argueing against myself, I've been lucky to have lots of education and opportunities to play in ensembles without ever going to a music college, and after my phase 1 training I will be going to a music college of sorts (Kneller Hall). Berklee is no doubt good for your abilities as a musician, I just don't believe it's the be-all-end-all people make it out to be, you're not doomed as a professional drummer just because you can't get into Berklee and play what the music colleges tell you to play.
 

jeffwj

Platinum Member
...Or is it like "ok, here's a sheet music and a snare drum solo, play it, now!" (last would be horrible..)
That won't be the whole audition, but I would say that almost every music program audition would require sight reading.

Jeff
 
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Anthony Amodeo

Guest
Like I said, I might have the wrong idea - I did say someone correct me if I'm being completely out of line. Music education is a good thing, I don't mean to slate Berklee. But if you're dedicated and know fundamental music theory (both for drums and harmony/everythingelseingeneral), have a good teacher, and practice regularly, then you'll still be pretty good.
You may not be able to play everything a music college guy can play - but you'll have the ability to learn it (as in, you can't play soandso lick because you don't know it and haven't practiced it, not because you don't have the chops or musicality). You learn an awful lot by just going out and playing, as well; join the local brass band, go to open jazz nights, join a drumline, play in a school production of a musical, take all the opportunities you can get, and yes to be fair Berklee of course counts as an opportunity haha.

Argueing against myself, I've been lucky to have lots of education and opportunities to play in ensembles without ever going to a music college, and after my phase 1 training I will be going to a music college of sorts (Kneller Hall). Berklee is no doubt good for your abilities as a musician, I just don't believe it's the be-all-end-all people make it out to be, you're not doomed as a professional drummer just because you can't get into Berklee and play what the music colleges tell you to play.
I think you have a bit of a warped misunderstanding of musical education

there is no be all end all to any institution

schooling doesn't hand you a career it gives you an opportunity to study with some masters of your craft ..,,.it's up to you what you do with your education ....and it is a good one

also......make me a list of the best places to network with serious aspiring musicians and I'll bet you Berklee is high on that list
 
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