Gear red flag - Update!

felonious69

Well-known member
I'd audition with my bass, (Trying to get good at that too) but I play with a pick and that's blasphemy I have heard (I will defer to Chris Squire).
Oh, and left side o- the pond.
 

mikyok

Platinum Member
I'd audition with my bass, (Trying to get good at that too) but I play with a pick and that's blasphemy I have heard (I will defer to Chris Squire).
Oh, and left side o- the pond.
That's just for snobs, there's a misconception that you need to be a virtuoso to be good in a band and we've all seen talented players who can't play with other musicians.

If you can do the basics well you'll never be short of a gig.
 

jimb

Member
Now that's weird and not something Ive ever come across before...and dare I even surmize that their opening demos were a load of meaningless tapping up near the pickguard??...haha
But yes the scourge of the internet telling us all that gear is the most important thing.
Front page news folks...It aint! In fact in my book its way down on the list.
 

River19

Senior Member
Beware of the man with simple gear as he probably knows how to play it well.

Just like, beware of the man with only one gun, he probably knows how to shoot it well.

Gear ain't everything BUT it is somewhere in the Top 5 boxes to check with playing ability, attitude/hang, transport, etc. Being on a small club gig and dealing with constant buzz and cracking like it is 1965 in Giant Stadium all because a guitarist still has the same cord he got in high school 25 years ago can get old quick........
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
I hate to say it, but the majority of ultra gear-heads I know are not great players. There are a few that are pretty good, but most of them are not.
 

CommanderRoss

Silver Member
I'm down with a player having professional gear, but that's secondary to ability & how well they play with others.
Don't show up with your caseless guitar and amp thrown into the back of your Jeep in the rain & expect me to trust the dependability of said gear.
I need it to work as much as I need you to work!

But again...your ability to play said gear needs to be #1. Otherwise I'll keep looking.
 

brentcn

Platinum Member
Indeed, & yes, it's a shame he's going this year, but it's just one of those things, & 100% understandable + amicable.


Tell them to go buy some gear! TBH, as bass is always DI'd, it's only the guitar itself that's of interest, & an octaver for a couple of songs.


Absolutely, but I find featuring to gear you have as a primary pitch point above most others is a bit weird, & tells me something about their playing priorities.


As harmony BVs are an important requirement we need to maintain, song selection will likely skew in that direction. These two tracks will certainly feature, along with a couple more. Ability to sing whilst keeping a pulse is right up there - not as easy as you'd think in 2/4.



And definitely not easy whilst keeping a fast & driving 16th note pulse.


Great stuff, solid band, stage production, and of course drumming! The bass player is clearly having a lot of fun, too. I'm sure he'll be missed. Michael Anthony comes to mind.

So, you guys want a bass player with good fundamentals, 16th note pick competency, harmonizing vocal ability, and an open schedule. It would take a miracle for that person to exist in my neck of the woods. All the bassists that I know that can do those things, are already out there gigging, and haven't actively looked for a band in many years. Around my area, good bassists work, and they don't need to sing backup.

Bands who lose members often try to find another full-time, 100% committed band member to replace them, rather than work with fill-in players. I think this is a big mistake, for a variety of reasons. Your band could lose other members if that position is empty for too long. This is how bands break up.

Can the vocal harmonies be supplied by someone else? To keep this train rolling, your band may have to learn to make life easy for a fill-in bassist who might only play one or two gigs. This means the band may need to do some additional work, and become organized and prepared in new ways. Do you have charts for songs? Can someone make bass charts? Do you have an iPad and stand for someone to read those charts (paper charts on a music stand looks dated and unprofessional these days).

A good bass player will almost certainly look at your gig and think: "that's a ton of work, learning all those songs from scratch". But, if you have charts, and have handled the vocal harmonies already, then that bass player will think the gig is much easier, and, hopefully, respect that it is so organized. Also, when you have created a situation where a new bassist can jump in and get up to speed quickly, then you can have more than one name to call.

After your band has played with a few fill-ins, you'll know pretty quickly who you would like to invite into the band full-time. Just as important, a fill-in will get to know the rest of the band over time, and can make an informed decision.
 

Lee-Bro

Senior Member
If someone doesn't have video, it doesn't take much for them to set up their phone and record themselves playing to online bass-less tracks so you can get a sense of their ability.

I used to suggest this to people who wanted to audition for my group (and not just bassists). I got to the point where I decided to stop suggesting to people who didn't have the initiative to do this on their own after reading that a video or audio sample was required. "But I'm really good," "But I'm a fast learner," "But I can play anything by ear," "But you won't be disappointed*," are all overused and under-delivered statements coming from the non-video having types. *Yes, I will be disappointed. It's happened too many times for me to to allow it again.

Not trying to be a negativo, it's just that if someone can't follow instructions (requirements), they just disqualified themselves from an audition.

Every job has its requirements. Like @brentcn w/ "Footloose," we audition replacements w/ specific songs -and we may add Footloose if we ever need to audition bass players again. :)


edited for grammar.
 
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wraub

Well-known member
...can't figure out why I can post a sentence here, but not a paragraph.
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
Here's my take on it. Rule one, play well. Be good at your instrument and play well with the band. Rule two, own decent gear that sounds good with the band and does not detract from your ability to play well at a minimum (i.e. is in good repair, reliable, and does not need constant fussing). Three, be a decent, pleasant human being who I would want to work/hang with.

I couldn't care less if the gear is $50, $500, or $5000 as long as all those things are in order.
 

MntnMan62

Junior Member
If someone leads with their equipment list when pitching for a gig, it means they are lacking in other more important areas like ability and experience. And it seems your experience with audtitions of such applicants bears this out. I can honestly say that I have never in my 45 yearrs of playing mentioned my gear to any band I was auditioning for unless they asked me. If find that those who can't play attempt to compensate with a fixation on their gear. All that time looking through catalogues and dreaming about owning this, that or the other thing could have been better spent practicing. But that's boring. I agree. Stay away from those focused on gear. It's just not normal.
 

alparrott

Platinum Member
I can honestly say that I have never in my 45 years of playing mentioned my gear to any band I was auditioning for unless they asked me.
I mean, they'll see it at the audition or in the video clips I link. I will say in an audition reply "I have reliable gear and transportation" and leave it right there.
 

Lee-Bro

Senior Member
...can't figure out why I can post a sentence here, but not a paragraph.
I had the same issue last week in another thread. I ended up doing a system reboot and was eventually able to post my full response in the thread.
 

Otto

Platinum Member
Are you saying you have never shown up to an audition to have a fellow auditioner ask if they could use your gear for the audition?

Owning gear needed to perform the gig you audition for would seem to be a given...but....
 

Xstr8edgtnrdrmrX

Well-known member
I hate to say it, but the majority of ultra gear-heads I know are not great players. There are a few that are pretty good, but most of them are not.

yep...the best players come in with a well worn, mid level set up...a set up that says" I have played many gigs"...

and as mentioned above, i don't mind a dusty, semi dinged up cabinet as long as the cord is in good shape, that shows attention to detail
 

wraub

Well-known member
I've been a bass player for a long while, so have been on calls like this many times.

Beyond stating I have adequate gear, I usually wouldn't mention specifics unless asked, and definitely wouldn't lead with it. That said, i have been asked if I have a Jazz Bass, or if I use effect pedals, or if I play a five string bass, and I can answer such.

I have several basses, some look new and some are very worn from years of actual play and use. Admittedly, if you're not onto the "relic" thing, they look a bit tatty, but it's real. If I think a situation might not want that, I bring a newer one.

As a bass player, I see different basses as different tools to fill different positions, and it's possible the responses are from some eager to tell you they are equipped for the job. Too bad their tool box is missing the important stuff.
 

wraub

Well-known member
If a well worn, mid level setup is an indicator of quality bass playing, then Ima sit here and wait for the gigs to roll in. :D🤣😂😅


yep...the best players come in with a well worn, mid level set up...a set up that says" I have played many gigs"...

and as mentioned above, i don't mind a dusty, semi dinged up cabinet as long as the cord is in good shape, that shows attention to detail
 
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