G. A. S. I've got it bad

SmoothOperator

Gold Member
Recently I find I am in an ugly cycle of gear acquisition syndrome. What are some methods to cope? I find the biggest culprit is that I have lots of limited free time these days. By limited, I mean I'm at work waiting for something, so I do a little online shopping, or I'm at home and the toddler is napping, so I have time, but not so much freedom, so I find myself shopping rather than playing with the items I already have or going out and doing something.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
Telling yourself no. Simple. Allow yourself to look, but no buying. Shut yourself down. Substitute something different. Self control is a beautiful thing.
 

Roadydad

Senior Member
Cancel your internet service, and flush your phone down the loo. Problem solved !
But then again, life's too short to leave all fun out of it.
 

cerendrad

Member
I can easily get obsessed with that new thing that will be awesome, research the crap out of it, anticipate it's arrival, play with it for a day and then the feeling wears off. I made myself stop as much as possible. I realized what I actually wanted was something similar (that is where the trick lies) but much harder to get. Real life experiences, connection to others, learning to be in the now, basically life rich stuff. Consumerism is fed to us on a constant basis through every form of media and even the way our society is set up. There is a saying around here "who ever dies with the most toys wins". It describes a mindset that a lot of companies would like every one to have. I try to think if I was on my death bed what would I tell myself today if I could go back in time. Probably that new kick pedal is not worth it and to play a board game with my daughter instead or work hard and create something.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
If you can afford it, have no debt, and have enough in the bank to retire on, I say "Go for it!"

If you don't, then stop.


One thing that I did to get rid of any GAS I ever had was I bought my first set of Pork Pie USA Customs. I loved looking at drums, but since I got EXACTLY what I wanted (even the finish was exactly what I wanted), I didn't even give another drum set another thought. I've accumulated more sets now, but it's been on an "as needed" basis. Same thing happened when I bought my Taylor guitar. I've not even THOUGHT about buying another guitar, and that was about 8 years ago.

Buy once, cry once.


Also, whatever you buy, pay in cash, not on a card. The reason is psychological. According to Dave Ramsey (a finance guy I watch/follow), when you pay in cash and you are physically counting out and handing over dollars, there is a response in the brain that is very similar to the signal of pain and discomfort. This is why people who pay with cash spend less...because it freakin' hurts! When you use a card or order online, those pain receptors aren't firing; therefore, it don't hurt as bad. Believe me, when you have a fist full of hundreds and you are getting ready to buy an instrument (or anything), it'll make you think twice.

In addition, by buying something for yourself, you are taking away something that you could use for your family. Best of luck!
 

Midnite Zephyr

Platinum Member
That's because the government has programmed you to be this way. You have been successfully and effectively brainwashed. Enjoy!
 

CommanderRoss

Silver Member
One thing that I did to get rid of any GAS I ever had was I bought my first set of Pork Pie USA Customs. I loved looking at drums, but since I got EXACTLY what I wanted (even the finish was exactly what I wanted), I didn't even give another drum set another thought.
This was me with my Gretsch kit. Bought and played a lot of "shit kits" over the years and when I finally got my holy grail set, that was it.

When I bought a whole pallet of drum shells, parts and accessories from an estate sale, I put together what I could to sell and put the spare parts in my supply drawers.
Having all those extra drums and accessories taught me I REALLY didn't like having all this stuff in my studio room.

Seems the G.A.S. was cured.
 

Groov-E

Silver Member
[...]
Also, whatever you buy, pay in cash, not on a card. The reason is psychological. [...]

This is why people who pay with cash spend less...because it freakin' hurts! [...]

In addition, by buying something for yourself, you are taking away something that you could use for your family. Best of luck!
1- getting what you like the first time around is awesome. When I get gas, I simply go buy new heads and that feeling is rekindled;

2- paying cash is definitely a major downer, and if I was to put 2000$ in my pockets, get in the car, I would probably think twice or forego the whole endeavor before entering the store;

3- buying stuff for the family also helps. Whenever gas hits, I buy my son a nintendo switch game and play with him, go skiing, offer a nice overnight trip with hotel and restaurant, etc.

I often feel GAS does hit whenever you have too a bit of spare time but not enough freedom on your plate, as seems to be the case with OP. Ask your wife for a 3-hour break, and go somewhere you can practice new exercices and jam to your favorite tunes (rent a space by the hour, your parent's house, your successful brother-in-law's cottage, name it).
 

Captain Bash

Silver Member
Operate a policy that you have to sell a drum or cymbal in order to buy a drum or cymbal. Money out can’t go above money in; no exceptions. It makes you really consider every purchase and ultimately helps you refine your set-up without impacting current or future finances.
 

wildbill

Platinum Member
Operate a policy that you have to sell a drum or cymbal in order to buy a drum or cymbal. Money out can’t go above money in; no exceptions. It makes you really consider every purchase and ultimately helps you refine your set-up without impacting current or future finances.

That doesn't work so good for me.
I buy something, then sell something to balance it out.

Then further down the line, I think 'damn, I shouldn't have sold that' and
end up buying another a lot of times.
Sometimes it's better just to expand without trying to contract.

If it expands too much, then it's time for the big purge.

Oh - but about how to cope with GAS - I find that if I just concentrate on using what I already have, it dissipates on its own.
For spare time at work, it might be sticks and a practice pad or something.
 

SmoothOperator

Gold Member
Great suggestions. I think, I will try to channel this into selling things. Though, I discussed this with my wife, and she pointed out that I don't actually have all that much I want to get rid of. Maybe a couple pieces of substandard equipment, that've upgraded. So, I guess that's encouraging.
 

dmacc_2

Well-known member
I'm on the complete other side of this equation.

I have everything (and more) that I can conceivable use or play for the rest of my life. I have sold off a bunch as well over time to reduce to what I have. I don't even have a need or desire to purchase sticks or heads.

I am back to a point in time that spanned 20+ years of purchasing almost nothing. It's a wonderful place to be if you can get your mind in that position.
 

PorkPieGuy

Platinum Member
1- getting what you like the first time around is awesome. When I get gas, I simply go buy new heads and that feeling is rekindled;
This is excellent advice! My kit at church goes through 1-2 Wednesday practices, an occasional Wednesday service where they get played, one Sunday rehearsal and three Sunday morning services. All of this on top of recording a CD a year for the church in addition to the occasional Praise and Worship concert. Needless to say, they get played A LOT! I hadn't changed heads out in over a year, and when I did, even the one of the guitar players (who is learning drums) couldn't believe how good everything sounded, especially the snare drum.

2- paying cash is definitely a major downer, and if I was to put 2000$ in my pockets, get in the car, I would probably think twice or forego the whole endeavor before entering the store;
Yup, I bought my last set of USA Pork Pies with $1200. I sat there and counted out twelve $100 bills. I was happy to have them, but man, it was painful initially.

3- buying stuff for the family also helps. Whenever gas hits, I buy my son a nintendo switch game and play with him, go skiing, offer a nice overnight trip with hotel and restaurant, etc.
I LOVE going places with my kids. Sounds like the OP has a real little one at the house, and if I'm very honest, going out with a little one isn't a whole lot of fun, but man when they hit about 4 or 5, going on trips is a lot of fun. My kids really don't care about "stuff." What they want to do is go places, and I feel the same way.

I often feel GAS does hit whenever you have too a bit of spare time but not enough freedom on your plate, as seems to be the case with OP. Ask your wife for a 3-hour break, and go somewhere you can practice new exercices and jam to your favorite tunes (rent a space by the hour, your parent's house, your successful brother-in-law's cottage, name it).
Time is such a precious commodity with me. I try my best to use it wisely, as I think everyone should.


These are excellent responses.
 

SmoothOperator

Gold Member
As per the time issue, it is nice to have the things, when also have the time, it helps make the most of it.

Yeah, traveling planning for the next trip, already took the little one on a cruise, it was a borderline miserable experience at 20months, but it was really pretty good she is much more comfortable going out and doing things now, and she was kicking into high gear on exploration anyway.

Plus it's another opportunity to pick up more stuff, like a mini steel drum, that sits on my snare stand.
 

Groov-E

Silver Member
These are excellent responses.
Well all responses were based off you previous post, so the credit is entirely yours !

Smoothoperator, I have travelled with both my kids and it was not easy, but I treasure the memories. We still take the plane once or twice a year as they are now 5 and 8, and despite having to clean up the lavatory waaayyy too often before I sit them on the loo because of previous passengers bathroom issues, it seems like smooth sailaing from now on.

And teach them harmonica, I'm almost certain harmonica players don't get bad cases of g.a.s. like us...
 
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