G.A.S. has been studied and is a real thing - Article

Lee-Bro

Senior Member

“Everybody enjoys it when you buy a new instrument or a new piece of musical equipment and share it with the community. It really is something that is a communal event. New Guitar Day, or something like that, and people are just happy for them, they take inspiration – ‘Maybe I need to play my Strat again. I haven’t played it for a while.’ And it’s very much like a support community where gear is just something positive, in most cases.”
 

Darth Vater

Senior Member
I'm guilty but as long as you can afford it or have a plan to sell something else what's the big deal? I just like to try new (or used) stuff. I drive a 16 y/o car (probably nicer than most peeps new one) and don't have any other hobbies other than traveling with the fam. I like drums! Sue me. :cool:
 

Quai34

Junior Member
Ditto, I have no skidoo, no RV, no big truck, normal medium house, no fancy furniture but a lot of gear for my hobbies, music and climbing and windsurfing...But when I buy, I can keep it for a long time as I still use it it all the time, I have keys that are from 1986 and they play like a charm!!!
 

Old PIT Guy

Well-known member
That’s pretty funny. A business that derives its income from advertising publishing an article that amounts to a balm for buyers so they’ll continue to read articles focused on gear next to ads for gear. Go figure. They should bring back cigarette ads for the magazines in oncologist's waiting rooms. Those vacation homes don't grow on trees!
 

MrInsanePolack

Platinum Member
I dont care for shopping. GAS has never really been a thing with me. I decide what I want, find it at it's most affordable price, then grit my teeth and trade $$$ for goods. I don't get that same excitement others get when they buy a new thing. If anything, I sometimes feel guilty for buying something unnecessary I want instead of putting the $$$ towards something more important.

I get more excited about tossing out unused items than introducing new ones. I really dont want things I dont use.
 

Thin Shell

Well-known member
That’s pretty funny. A business that derives its income from advertising publishing an article that amounts to a balm for buyers so they’ll continue to read articles focused on gear next to ads for gear. Go figure. They should bring back cigarette ads for the magazines in oncologist's waiting rooms. Those vacation homes don't grow on trees!
That article has got to be some of the worst hokum, hogwash, BS or any other adjective you can think of. Even if you set aside your very accurate observation of the huge conflict of interest, the biggest issue I have is your second point: the article is a complete piece of rationalization.

The sentence that summed the author's mindset was this: "And it’s very much like a support community where gear is just something positive, in most cases.”

I would be very interested in the "methodology" the author used. If you speak to a bunch of gear heads, of course they are going to say there is no problem. Did he ask questions about the individual's personal life? How many marriages, debt load, retirement funding, frequency and types of arguments with significant others around the financial impacts of GAS or emotional unavailability due to GAS related research and activities? Or conflicts due to storage of all of this gear. I seriously doubt it.

I'm not a guitarist, but I can see the need for a fair number of pedals. Up to a point. Depending on what they are playing, they might need to be able to produce a large number of sounds. I can even see the point for several guitars and amps. Different sounds and ability to have equipment for practice and equipment for gigging. The same with drums. If you are gigging drummer, two drum sets is a very nice situation. Having one kit that stays setup and another in bags ready to go is a luxury, but not unreasonable. A couple of snare drums for different rooms is also a reasonable luxury. Upgrading from a low end kit or snare to a better quality instrument is completely reasonable. Filling your basement with stuff? Not so much.

Where I part ways with this is buying a new drum kit every couple of years, just because, Or having a crap load of snares, just because. Buying something because you just have to have it and then turning around and selling it makes no sense to me. I suspect that in most cases, gear heads lose money on this activity. By the time you factor in shipping, packaging and listing fees, unless you got something for a steal, money will be lost.

I don't know how many "forever drum kits" or "forever snares" I have seen bought and posted about, only to see up for sale in a short time.

And I don't discount the fact that as a drummer, I should be playing the drums. If I am spending the majority of my time buying and selling instead of playing and practicing, how is that furthering my craft?

If someone is a pro, and/or well heeled, and collecting isn't causing problems in someone's life, then so be it. I do agree with one point of the article: GAS is much more of an issue with amateurs. Pros tend to be too busy working to get all caught up with GAS. They aren't thinking that if they can get the same snare that Neil Peart or Tony Williams used, I will be able to do what they do. A lot of amateurs have this mindset, at least to a certain degree.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
What a nothing article that was, total fluff

GAS I think has overshadowed becoming proficient on an instrument, at least that's what it seems to me

As a former GASSER, I like it better now. Less complication, less distraction, more actual practicing.

It's much nicer to not to be controlled by GAS
 

Darth Vater

Senior Member
What a nothing article that was, total fluff

GAS I think has overshadowed becoming proficient on an instrument, at least that's what it seems to me

As a former GASSER, I like it better now. Less complication, less distraction, more actual practicing.

It's much nicer to not to be controlled by GAS
I practice PLENTY. I have a #1 kit, my favorite, and usually a 2nd and even a 3rd for spells. It doesn't have anything to do with how much I practice. This notion that someone is controlled by acquiring gear is nonsense, at least in my case. Variety is the spice of life if you ask me. Sometimes I think this forum is "anti-gear" what with the opinions I see where if you pay more than a grand for a kit you're some kind of poser or can't play. I always have a couple of nice kits setup and If anyone wants to stop by and trade some 4's let me know.
 

wraub

Well-known member
I have run out of G.A.S. I have it no more.

I had it for quite a while, but now it's gone.

Now, all I have is gear I really enjoy, and I play it as often as possible-sometimes daily. Played drums and guitar yesterday, not a bad day.

Now I have S.A.S.- Skills Acquisitions Syndrome.
It's better than G.A.S., imo.
 

larryace

"Uncle Larry"
I practice PLENTY. I have a #1 kit, my favorite, and usually a 2nd and even a 3rd for spells. It doesn't have anything to do with how much I practice. This notion that someone is controlled by acquiring gear is nonsense, at least in my case. Variety is the spice of life if you ask me. Sometimes I think this forum is "anti-gear" what with the opinions I see where if you pay more than a grand for a kit you're some kind of poser or can't play. I always have a couple of nice kits setup and If anyone wants to stop by and trade some 4's let me know.

Fair enough man
 

Darth Vater

Senior Member
Station in life is a huge factor too. My wife and I are both retired with both daughters through college and working. I gigged A LOT when I was younger and had a blast doing it in the 60's,70's and 80's. I'm not out to try to recreate it in some dopey tribute band. If I go to a bar I'm there to drink and dance! I've gigged all I care to at this point so I need a room with some toys in it. I totally understand the ideas of gigging kits and economics of being younger trying to save a buck here and there.

One thing I taught both my kids was the danger of credit cards and having the ability to pay for things you buy whether it's in cash or credit. I would agree that if people are buying just to buy and are neglecting their family situation, or even their personal well being, that they have a problem.
 

Square

Well-known member
Guilty as charged... I practice daily which in my case is a must. I started late and if I have any hope of "catching up" I must put in the hours. The next task is to make sure my practice time is productive, I have doubts.

My nemesis is GAS... Not because some new object will make me better, but because I like new (to me) stuff. The less time I spend shopping, and surfing forums, the more time I'll have to practice. I need to remember, and apply, that.

In my case I never buy on credit and the finance dept (wife) typically signs off on any discretionary funds expenditure in advance.
 
I have run out of G.A.S. I have it no more.

I had it for quite a while, but now it's gone.

Now, all I have is gear I really enjoy, and I play it as often as possible-sometimes daily. Played drums and guitar yesterday, not a bad day.

Now I have S.A.S.- Skills Acquisitions Syndrome.
I am really truly no kidding jealous.
I have GAS. I wish I didn't, I fight it, but I do.
But I wish I had SAS. I do try to improve—there's always something I'm working on (right now it's faster, cleaner Bonham triplets and six stroke rolls)—but for me GAS is far stronger than SAS. So, I said, I'm honestly jealous.
I have SASAS. (Skills Acquisition Syndrome Acquisition Syndrome)
 

felonious69

Well-known member
When I started getting guitars again, I wanted to get my fingers back because of hand damage.
I have 6 now, but I wanted "different ones", so I have
A 12 string acoustic, a 6 string electric acoustic, and electric bass, and acoustic electric (Dreadnaught style) bass, a Stratocaster and a Les Paul.
I wanted a keyboard, so I got one.
Amps and such... well, ya GOTTA get those!
I wanted a drum set so I got one. I wanted Roto toms, so I got a set.
The car I drive is a '07 RAV4 that I got for 500 bux in '18. I have put tires, oil changes and a battery in it. I have put 65,000 miles on it so far and it's running fine.
I'll probably "retire" when I fall off my chair at work, and folks say "Man! I don't think I've ever seen Bob being lazy before!" (someone else) "And he finally shut up!"
I spend my money on what I want to...
Practice (the motivation to do more of it) would be nice.
I'm OK, You're OK...or something like that.
 

felonious69

Well-known member
I once knew a drummer with GAS,
The gear that he bought was first class,
I suggested one day, that the guy couldn’t play,
So he shoved his stick bag up my [kickport?]!
:oops:
I have thought about porting my bass drum...but I have seen the stick bag thread...and...YEEEEOUCH!
 

Vintage Old School

Gold Member
I can openly say with great certainty that there are two things that will never happen to me in my lifetime: 1) Being called as a stand-in for Brad Pitt
and 2) Securing a professional drum endorsement.

So I have always paid for my own gear for the past 50 "plus" years and will continue to do so. For the first 40 of those years each purchase was dictated by two factors: a tight budget and a Type A personality. My personality tended to lock in on only liking one certain thing at a time, so why even bother adding on an extra snare or cymbal? That would be futility, or so I thought. If that were to ever happen--and it never did--my budget constraints would have kicked in.
Less is more was my adage.

But as fate would have it several things changed in my 50's. First, it's like a switch was flipped on and all of a sudden I became intrigued by options. The thought of owning a shell bank or multiple snares no longer seemed unnecessary, it seemed inviting. Second, I made a career move and locked in on doing location audio recording for video and film production. I became hyper aware of sound, sonics and audio and that carried over in a new way to my drumming. Third, years of frugal saving; driving each and every car a minimum of 22 years; living well below our means; two wonderful, incredible daughters rolling off of the family payroll; and having a steady cush side gig that paid me monthly on an annual rider for 16 years; all of these leaving my wife and I in a good financial spot. Not rich but comfortable.

My wife voiced some concern when I started acquiring more gear than anticipated. I said, "Look at it this way, gear is 'Man Jewelry'." She immediately got it. And when I told her my objective in life was to grow old with her and my gear she became my biggest supporter.

I don't buy gear just to have more things. I'm acquiring very specific sounds from all my drums and cymbals. I'm building sound, percussive systems through very selective purchases. I have to confess I have more than I deserve, but I'm having the time of my life mixing things up. I'm playing for the sheer enjoyment of playing these days. Every few weeks the setup changes and I experiment until I learn something new that puts a smile on my face. Now my adage is variety is the spice of life.

So just a closing observation. Enjoy what you have. Don't ever compare yourself or your gear to others. Gear never defines your talent nor your abilities.

And remember for all of us who enjoy finding a good used deal at an incredible price, someone else had to purchase that equipment new before ultimately sending it on down the proverbial pipeline at a steeply discounted price for someone else to own. Everyone has a part in supporting our drum and cymbal manufacturers to keep them afloat. And some gear collectors serve to preserve pieces of history that may one day land in your collection to enjoy.

The great theologian Sheryl Crow says it well, "It's not having what you want/It's wanting what you've got."
 
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