From programmed original to live acoustic

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
As I already mentioned, the band is going for a much powered up (& slightly increased tempo) version, but the only material I have to rehearse to currently mimics the original, so I have to make do with it being out of context. That's fine, I'm just mapping the mechanical stuff.

Anyhow, here's a clip of me working through some parts directly after the first tryout with the band, & trying to overlay the version in my head with the reference audio I have. Hopefully, all will become clear when you hear the full band version, but with this audio, it kinda doesn't work too well, as it's all far to timid, slower, and with different guitar patterns to our version.

 

GetAgrippa

Platinum Member
You know I love the lively kick-really drives this song (sounds good). The hats time starts off slow then picks up after about 20 sec-that intentional or just adjusting everything in your head trying to sort it out? After that it flows well. I have to ask how many cymbal stands and hat stands do you have piled up over there? I can't wait to hear the bands take on it-I think it will congeal better when you play with the band (hard to console practicing to wrong version from what you will play).
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
Thanks Art - I thought about posting this or not, because it's so out of context with the version this drum part is designed for, plus it's a bit shabby.

The hats time starts off slow then picks up after about 20 sec-that intentional or just adjusting everything in your head trying to sort it out?
The first section then into the verse are the same speed, just the hihat pattern is different (effectively 4/4 to 12/8). It does give the impression of a tempo change, especially in this context.
 

Channing

Member
When I play this song, I play it two handed, starting with the left hand. so its lrlRlr with the capital being the snare and the lowercase ones being hi hat hits. I'm not sure if that's right or not but it was the only way to get the feel right (to my ears) since I can't play the hi hat that fast with just one hand.

The fills are possible to play using this two handed technique, too, just figure out which ones need to be on the snare and then hit the snare at that time.

Maybe I'm not explaining this very well but when I play the song it sounds more or less like the recording.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
When I play this song, I play it two handed, starting with the left hand. so its lrlRlr with the capital being the snare and the lowercase ones being hi hat hits. I'm not sure if that's right or not but it was the only way to get the feel right (to my ears) since I can't play the hi hat that fast with just one hand.

The fills are possible to play using this two handed technique, too, just figure out which ones need to be on the snare and then hit the snare at that time.

Maybe I'm not explaining this very well but when I play the song it sounds more or less like the recording.
You've explained it just fine. Left hand lead playing 12/8 mirrors the shaker part in the percussion track, and works really well with the original song vibe (although it's not the original part). Unfortunately, in the context I'm required to play the song (much more powerful), I need that singular figure HH accent.
 

Channing

Member
You've explained it just fine. Left hand lead playing 12/8 mirrors the shaker part in the percussion track, and works really well with the original song vibe (although it's not the original part). Unfortunately, in the context I'm required to play the song (much more powerful), I need that singular figure HH accent.
I watched your video. I see what you’re saying. The way you play it is close enough to the feel of the song, although it’s different from how I would play it. I’d be trying to fit those accents into a two handed groove.
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
Ok, I was preferring to put something up when finished, but to give you an idea of context, here's a short clip from the very first time we tried it out. Of course, everyone's just messing around / experimenting, & camera audio, but hopefully you get the idea.

 

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
Ok, I was preferring to put something up when finished, but to give you an idea of context, here's a short clip from the very first time we tried it out. Of course, everyone's just messing around / experimenting, & camera audio, but hopefully you get the idea.

Now you got me wanting to give this a try. I don't remember the original starting off with quarter notes on the HH but I will give it a listen to again. Nice playing!
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
Now you got me wanting to give this a try. I don't remember the original starting off with quarter notes on the HH but I will give it a listen to again. Nice playing!
Thank you :) The original absolutely did not start with 1/4 notes on the hihat, but I'm working with a significantly powered up vibe. As for playing, we're just messing with it on the very first tryout, so it's a bit scruffy, and parts are all over the place. It's what we do when we're testing for band vibe.

By the next rehearsal, we expect all to return with parts nailed down, then polish with BVs and a few tweaks. It then goes into the set if it's good enough, & move on to the next song batch.
 

timmdrum

Silver Member
I've always covered it with all the triplet notes using one hand on the hi-hat, accenting the same notes you're playing after the intro, Andy, because I could hit the 1 a little easier that way, even though it was double the notes from my right hand. (one-TRIP-let-TWO-trip-LET). In a heavier/faster version like you're doing, I'd be inclined to cut it to just the accents also, and I like the touch of certain sections only having the 4/4 quarter / 12/8 dotted quarter. Good stuff, man.

Your singer reminds me of Robert Pollard, but sober. You, he, and the rest sound great!
 
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rhumbagirl

Senior Member
Thank you :) The original absolutely did not start with 1/4 notes on the hihat, but I'm working with a significantly powered up vibe. As for playing, we're just messing with it on the very first tryout, so it's a bit scruffy, and parts are all over the place. It's what we do when we're testing for band vibe.

By the next rehearsal, we expect all to return with parts nailed down, then polish with BVs and a few tweaks. It then goes into the set if it's good enough, & move on to the next song batch.
Can't wait to hear it! I want to give this song a try in the meantime. I had a dog bite to my right hand a couple of weeks ago and just now getting back to playing. Not a terrible bite. My own dog, a male Lhasa Apso whose getting old and aggressive. And I'm rusty on the youtube thing. Haven't made a video in 5 yrs or so. It's that whole aligning of video to audio that really sucks for me. Total time grabber. Anyway, the drums are miked and the Scarlet is setup with my DAW - Ableton Live on a Macbook.
 

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
The problem is the miked drumset is more for jazz than rock. It's a Gretsch Catalina Club square badge:



The drums I practice on everyday are my 1980s TAMA Granstars:

 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
I've always covered it with one hand on the hi-hat, accenting the same notes you're playing after the intro, Andy, because I could hit the 1 a little easier that way, even though it was double the notes from my right hand. (one-TRIP-let-TWO-trip-LET). In a heavier/faster version like you're doing, I'd be inclined to cut it to just the accents also, and I like the touch of certain sections only having the 4/4 quarter / 12/8 dotted quarter. Good stuff, man.
With the exception of the 4/4 quarter (& other later stuff in the bridge + some fills), I'm playing the original groove, including the slight workout bass drum figure that many lazy old farts like me usually try to "simplify" ;)

T4F dots.png

Can't wait to hear it! I want to give this song a try in the meantime. I had a dog bite to my right hand a couple of weeks ago and just now getting back to playing. Not a terrible bite. My own dog, a male Lhasa Apso whose getting old and aggressive. And I'm rusty on the youtube thing. Haven't made a video in 5 yrs or so. It's that whole aligning of video to audio that really sucks for me. Total time grabber. Anyway, the drums are miked and the Scarlet is setup with my DAW - Ableton Live on a Macbook.
I'm sorry to hear of your unfortunate cantankerous aged woofer incident :(

Audio / video - for anything I'm sharing in discussions like this, or between band members, I just use the camera audio for simplicity / time saving. It's only a reference, & so long as the audio isn't outright horrible, it's fine.


The problem is the miked drumset is more for jazz than rock. It's a Gretsch Catalina Club square badge:
The drums I practice on everyday are my 1980s TAMA Granstars:
Again, for reference material exchange, it really doesn't matter what kit is used IMHO, & as previously stated, just use the camera audio. Alternatively, you could just move the mics if detail really bugs you. Of course, for anything you're "putting out there", that's a different matter.
 

timmdrum

Silver Member
With the exception of the 4/4 quarter (& other later stuff in the bridge + some fills), I'm playing the original groove, including the slight workout bass drum figure that many lazy old farts like me usually try to "simplify" ;)

View attachment 90392
Right, I got that. I misspoke earlier- I meant to say "with all the triplet notes using one hand on the hi-hat", playing the notes you rest on. I corrected it in my post.
 

rhumbagirl

Senior Member
Again, for reference material exchange, it really doesn't matter what kit is used IMHO, & as previously stated, just use the camera audio. Alternatively, you could just move the mics if detail really bugs you. Of course, for anything you're "putting out there", that's a different matter.
Well, I'm probably going to lean toward the entire kit miked. I've had the Scarlett audio interface for over 5 years and still haven't made a video with it LOL. That and the fact that I rarely play the Gretsch these days, I'm going to spend the next couple of days moving the mics and cables. More fun :)
 

Andy

Administrator
Staff member
Right, I got that. I misspoke earlier- I meant to say "with all the triplet notes using one hand on the hi-hat", playing the notes you rest on. I corrected it in my post.
Got you! I've seen only a few bands attempt this song. All have taken an original vibe approach, & in every case, the drummer has played all 12 notes / bar on the hihat, even though such a hihat part never existed on the original song. Of course, everyone's trying to imitate the programmed shaker part.

Exhibit A:


In my playing context, it's a much more guttural / accent bias that's required.


Well, I'm probably going to lean toward the entire kit miked. I've had the Scarlett audio interface for over 5 years and still haven't made a video with it LOL. That and the fact that I rarely play the Gretsch these days, I'm going to spend the next couple of days moving the mics and cables. More fun :)
The earlier video I put up here of me home rehearsing, is just using a little zoom camera on audio only setting as an overhead. For reference stuff only, I think the sound is more than acceptable - certainly no need for a fully mic'd kit IMHO.
 

moxman

Silver Member
I haven't tried this song before but know it well of course.. like many of the posts here, to cover both parts (shaker and sticks) I'd play ghost notes with the left on the hats and accent the actual recorded hat part with the right.. seems like it would capture the feel of the song. On the original it's hard to hear the shaker except in the intro.. but its felt through out the song.. Your video sounds like you've got it together.. my only suggestion would be to lean into the right hand triplet part a bit more.. sounds a bit too straight.. but well done!
 
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