For those that have "made it" in the music biz

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
Some people accuse me of having made it, so I'll try to answer your question, but to be clear on what you mean by "living on the edge of the abyss", is that like living paycheck to paycheck? I think we all go through that at times, and it's certainly not limited to the pursuit of the arts, it can happen in any profession (or especially the lack of!) I've had no problem balancing day jobs and a full-time career with my music in the past, because I refused to be a starving artist. FYI, starving for one's art is highly over-rated!

My life and career are great just playing music, and I'm in my prime drumming-wise and always growing and moving forward.

So to answer your question, no.

Bermuda
 

caddywumpus

Platinum Member
Since it's my sole source of income, I'll answer.

Sometimes you're on the edge of the abyss, and sometimes you're on the top of the world. They don't call it "feast or famine" for nothing. Just as it is for EVERYONE, you need to learn to control your finances, and it's especially important to have some cashola "stored away for a rainy day".
 

BassDriver

Silver Member
Interesting your take on this...

...the question was partly on the philosophical subject of the happy person being the person the lives on the edge; never giving into security, loving the thrill of risk, accepting the uncertainty of the future...

...as you can see, when you step down to reality, people would prefer not to be the starving artist.

Some people accuse me of having made it, so I'll try to answer your question, but to be clear on what you mean by "living on the edge of the abyss", is that like living paycheck to paycheck? I think we all go through that at times, and it's certainly not limited to the pursuit of the arts, it can happen in any profession (or especially the lack of!) I've had no problem balancing day jobs and a full-time career with my music in the past, because I refused to be a starving artist. FYI, starving for one's art is highly over-rated!
I would say you have "made it", established a working music career for yourself, doing what you like and getting paid for it (however much that is).
 

bermuda

Drummerworld Pro Drummer - Administrator
Staff member
Interesting your take on this...

...the question was partly on the philosophical subject of the happy person being the person the lives on the edge; never giving into security, loving the thrill of risk, accepting the uncertainty of the future...

...as you can see, when you step down to reality, people would prefer not to be the starving artist.
There are people who have the freedom to live on the edge as you defined it, unbound by a home, possessions, family, etc. They come and go as they please, and in a way I suppose they're to be respected for embracing that freedom; the simple life. And yes, there are artists who believe they have to suffer/starve for their art to be valid. But either direction usually doesn't add up to much in the scheme of things.

I know several such people and artists, some seemingly happy and carefree, some deep in that abyss with little hope of getting out, but none of them with anything to show for the life they chose. Given the envious comments they make to me about what I've been able to achieve, I guess their "thrill" wasn't really worth it.

For me, I'm having a ball being tied to my life and career, and I can also afford freedoms that they can't.

Bermuda
 

Derek Roddy

DRUMMERWORLD PRO DRUMMER
Can you please define "making it"?
Because if you'd "made it" .....there should be no need to "look in the abyss".

D
 
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