Flat Ride as a Crash?

JaysonJeanChannel

Well-known member
I have always been interested in a flat ride, but not as a ride but as a crash.

My eyes have always been on the 20" Zildjian K light flat ride as a crash. What are your thought?
 

TK-421

Senior Member
Definitely not my thing, but if you like it, go for it!
But I would recommend crashing one in person before making the plunge. The few flat rides I’ve attempted to crash in person (including a 20” K Custom) did not sound at all like the one in the video. Their crash sound was pretty rancid. Though if you want to use it as a ride, that’s a different story.
 

toddbishop

Platinum Member
Maybe with a mic right on it like that, not for normal playing. Do you have some kind of special application in mind for it?
 

NouveauCliche

Senior Member
I have always been interested in a flat ride, but not as a ride but as a crash.

My eyes have always been on the 20" Zildjian K light flat ride as a crash. What are your thought?
I had an 18" K flat ride as one of my main rides for a long time. There was times when I crashed it -but I always felt like had to hit it HARD to keep up as a crash...even in a jazz setting it never wanted to open up as a crash - which makes complete sense with the lack of bell and the extremely controlled sound of a flat ride. When it would crash - it sounded like a clunky splash - which wasn't super pleasant to my ears.

But hey - that's the cool thing about cymbals - that could be your signature sound.
 

JaysonJeanChannel

Well-known member
I had an 18" K flat ride as one of my main rides for a long time. There was times when I crashed it -but I always felt like had to hit it HARD to keep up as a crash...even in a jazz setting it never wanted to open up as a crash - which makes complete sense with the lack of bell and the extremely controlled sound of a flat ride. When it would crash - it sounded like a clunky splash - which wasn't super pleasant to my ears.

But hey - that's the cool thing about cymbals - that could be your signature sound.
That's one, if not, my main issue with a flat ride. I love the sound, but it does feel like Imma have to hit the thing hard just for that crash sound like in the video.
 

bongoman

Junior Member
I’m a huge fan of flats, BUT very few of them have a good crash sound. Most (especially the dry patina ones) sound terrible as crashes: sour, dead, jarring, bongy, or all of the above. So I have gone cherry picking through loads of them in person or via online samples, to find two that have a good crash. Of those two, just one is available off the shelf, a Paiste 602 medium 20”. Actually the Paiste traditionals 20” was pretty ok too, but I liked the 602 better.
 

C.M. Jones

Well-known member
I don't use rides as crashes, meaning I don't crash my ride under any circumstances, nor do I buy rides and set them up as crashes. Lots of other players do, however, and I see nothing wrong with it. Be as creative as you wish with your cymbal selection. It's your own personal palette, an opportunity to forge a unique tonal voice. The drumming world is yours to shape.
 

JaysonJeanChannel

Well-known member
I don't use rides as crashes, meaning I don't crash my ride under any circumstances, nor do I buy rides and set them up as crashes. Lots of other players do, however, and I see nothing wrong with it. Be as creative as you wish with your cymbal selection. It's your own personal palette, an opportunity to forge a unique tonal voice. The drumming world is yours to shape.
That was me for a while. But experimenting with the idea, I love using rides as a crash. I enjoy crashing on rides and hearing that lovely sound they make. But I fully respect your opinion and appreciate that you shared it with me.
 

ToneT

Well-known member
I LOVE flat rides!
20" A and a 20" K Custom. I could never part with them!
I was floored by the one DeJohnette played on "Picture 3. ("Pictures" ECM) Delicious low-pitched overtones!

I never crash them though. But, it's your court so do what you like.
 

TK-421

Senior Member
That's one, if not, my main issue with a flat ride. I love the sound, but it does feel like Imma have to hit the thing hard just for that crash sound like in the video.
You know, they’re not designed to be crashed, and were never intended to be crashed. That’s why it’s most likely going to sound like a turd in that application. I’m all for using rides as crashes, but only the right kind of rides. A 20” Constantinople Thin Ride makes a very nice crash. A 21” Z Custom Mega Bell Ride, not so much.

Pick your weapons wisely.
 
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iCe

Senior Member
Never owned or played a flat ride (but the idea of having one is nice), but from what i've hear on vids etc. is almost like a compressed crash sound.
Obviously it's because a bell is missing and that reduces (crash) volume. The Meinl Generation X Thomas Lang crash cymbals sound similar. I don't see them listed on the Meinl site anymore, so i think those went under quietly. Very small bell, compressed sound and low in volume as well (different alloy as well though).
Personally; if i ever get a flat ride, i would just use it to ride on it. Believe Terry Bozzio actually has a Radia Flat ride in his main stack (the one with a china beneath a x-hat with a bell or something like that on top).
 

JaysonJeanChannel

Well-known member
You know, they’re not designed to be crashed, and were never intended to be crashed. That’s why it’s most likely going to sound like a turd in that application. I’m all for using rides as crashes, but only the right kind of rides. A 20” Constantinople Thin Ride makes a very nice crash. A 21” Z Custom Mega Bell Ride, not so much.

Pick your weapons wisely.
Wise words!
 

Ron_M

Senior Member
I'll be the dissenter; I've owned a 20" K Custom ride that had a good crash, whether shoulder shank, or just full on. Nice white noise. I currently have a 24" Soultone that's a thin monster of a flat, and it has a great crash. The drawback to flats is that they're quiet, but if using in a low volume situation, it works as a cool alternative-sound crash.
 

Woolwich

Silver Member
On the one hand, when it comes to drums and cymbals anyone is at liberty to do whatever they want with anything at whatever tuning.
On the other, there are so many excellent crash cymbals out there (All with their own qualities but all made with the specific intentions to be crashed) that unless someone has tried all or most of them already and found them all to be wanting then I question why they would want to use something specifically designed for another purpose.
If I happened to have a flat ride already/if I could pick one up at a giveaway price/if I had an alternative use lined up for one irrespective of it's crashability, then I'd experiment. But I wouldn't put good money down on something that's good for one job and expect it to do another.
 

bonerpizza

Silver Member
I don't put a lot of trust into cymbal demo videos, the few times I've bought cymbals based on a YouTube video they never sounded like I was expecting. That being said, try it out in person and see what you think or at least buy it from somewhere with a decent return policy.
 
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