First Time Testing My Rig

Supergrobi

Technical Supervisor
After my rehearsal and recording space got rebuilt eventually, I was able to do a first, very brief test recording of my setup, which is my Paiste cymbals, a DW Collectors, a SONOR Artist Series AS1406 CM and my new collection of studio gear. Microphone setup is as follows:
  • Bassdrum
    • DIY Subkick made of a Gallien Kruger 10"
    • Front head: Audio Technica AT4047
    • SHURE Beta 91A on a Kelly Shu Flatz Bass, flat response setting
  • Snaredrum
    • Top: Earthworks DM20
    • Bottom: SHURE Beta 98AD/C
  • HiHat: AKG C1000S (with modded casing and electronics)
  • Toms: SHURE Beta 98AD/C
  • Overheads: Oktava MK012 matched pair
I recorded through a Soundcraft Ui24R into my DELL XPS15 running Ardour 6.

This test is missing:
  • The Wurst (I'm using a cheapo AKG dynamic tom mic for this)
  • 2 room mics AKG C1000S (same mod as mentioned above)
  • omnidirectional room mic Warm Audio WA-47
Fun thing is: there's absolutely no effects and not even even a mix involved. All channels are running at 0dB flat without any compression, gating, EQ'ing or what else. I just did some minor tweaks on the panorama settings to position the instruments where they are located in the overheads.

Toms are dampened with a single moon gel each, the bass drum has a single DW pillow, barely touching the front head and the thin ring of a EMAD applied to the the batter head. No other dampening involved.

Focus was on microphone selection and positioning, so please don't hang me because of my poor performance :rolleyes: Also the toms are a bit out of tune.


To me this sounds like a good starting point for further experiments on tuning/dampening, microphone positioning, room mic'ing, mixing and mastering. Really looking forward to start using my new musical monkey bars :)

Some photos of my DIY subkick (the cheapo Millenium DI box got replaced by a R.U.D.I by Atelier der Tonkunst, offering a very flat frequency response between 20Hz - 50kHz with 1dB difference at max):

Subkick Freigestellt.png IMG_20190608_195058.jpg Subkick 3.jpg Gallien-Krueger-GK-10‘‘-Bass-Lautsprecher-Speaker-mit-8.jpeg
atelierDerTonkunst_product_rudi_1.jpg
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
That’s a great sound! Glad to see you weren’t affected by all that flooding.
 

yammyfan

Senior Member
Sounds great and no need to apologize for your playing. You solo much better than I do and play as well as a lot of working drummers I've listened to.
 

Supergrobi

Technical Supervisor
That’s a great sound!
Yes, I'm pretty excited, too!
Glad to see you weren’t affected by all that flooding.
All in all it had cost around 10k€ and a few weeks of build time, but eventually we are exactly where we were at when the incident happened.
 

Supergrobi

Technical Supervisor
You solo much better than I do and play as well as a lot of working drummers I've listened to.
Wow 😳 thanks a bunch dude, although it's a bit hard to believe..
 

calan

Silver Member
Sounds good.

I'm slowly getting to that point with my own room and UI24r. I suspect that your room beats mine by significant margin.
 

Supergrobi

Technical Supervisor
I'm slowly getting to that point with my own room and UI24r.
Yes, it's a fantastic bang for the buck. But even leaving the low price aside it sounds very good to me, no need for other mic pres or ADC. I planned replacing it with Focusrite Clarett and an Audient ASP800 but currently I don't see the need.

I suspect that your room beats mine by significant margin.
I spent a lot of time on the acoustical concept - apart from sound proofing. The room serves various use-cases (rehearsal, recording, mixing/mastering) at the same time and is performing really well at all of them. I managed to create separate zones with a specific sound each for the various applications. Center of the room is dead through the whole frequency range, which is where the sweet spot of the mixing/mastering desk is. Corners come with well-balanced reflections, focusing on a nice live recording sound. And half of the room is something in between to support articulate and balanced rehearsal sound.
 

calan

Silver Member
Yes, it's a fantastic bang for the buck. But even leaving the low price aside it sounds very good to me, no need for other mic pres or ADC. I planned replacing it with Focusrite Clarett and an Audient ASP800 but currently I don't see the need.


I spent a lot of time on the acoustical concept - apart from sound proofing. The room serves various use-cases (rehearsal, recording, mixing/mastering) at the same time and is performing really well at all of them. I managed to create separate zones with a specific sound each for the various applications. Center of the room is dead through the whole frequency range, which is where the sweet spot of the mixing/mastering desk is. Corners come with well-balanced reflections, focusing on a nice live recording sound. And half of the room is something in between to support articulate and balanced rehearsal sound.
Mine is basically a multipurpose live room, either rehearsal or demo recording. I don't really plan on ever getting to doing distribution quality recording, and mastering never, so my considerations aren't so stringent either.

I still made bass traps for the corners and am somewhere in the middle of about 32 sq of skyline diffuser. Rectangle room, two walls block, two framed with drywall. Not my building, so altering the geometry is not viable.
 

Supergrobi

Technical Supervisor
That’s a great sound! Glad to see you weren’t affected by all that flooding.
Ah now I get it - you meant the flooding in southern Germany! Yeah, fortunately I'm located in the northern areas. It's horrific what was going on there.

On topic: after listening to the recordings a couple of times I'm feeling like I have to get a different microphone for the hi hat. The modded C1000 sounds a bit too sharp for my liking. I definitely would prefer a more balanced, silky sound like the Oktavas or maybe a used AKG SE300 with the CK91 capsule.
 

J-W

Well-known member
Wow. That sounds great. All that hard work on (and in) the studio really paid off. (y)

And that DIY subkick sounds great. A lot of people were using the Yamaha JA-1801 out of the NS-10 before it was discontinued. What did you use on yours?
 

Supergrobi

Technical Supervisor
Wow. That sounds great. All that hard work on (and in) the studio really paid off. (y)
Absolutely, thanks a lot, mate!

And that DIY subkick sounds great. A lot of people were using the Yamaha JA-1801 out of the NS-10 before it was discontinued. What did you use on yours?
Yeah, never understood that, honestly. I mean the NS10 is known and famous for it's lack of bass frequencies - and then they try to transduce the lowest frequencies in a mix with it? Odd.

I chose a speaker dedicated to this frequency range - a 10" from a Gallien Kruger bass amp. It's shock-mounted inside a cheapo 12" Millenium tom, which is covered with mesh heads and coated with black pyramid foam on the inside. Speaker sits approx. 2" behind the bearing edge, so setting it up 1" close to the front head it has the perfect distance (width of a hand) to it. There's not much bleed from other instruments due to the shell, the foam and the close distance. This is a photo of the actual speaker from the ebay auction, which I dyed black using black ink:

index.php
 

J-W

Well-known member
Absolutely, thanks a lot, mate!


Yeah, never understood that, honestly. I mean the NS10 is known and famous for it's lack of bass frequencies - and then they try to transduce the lowest frequencies in a mix with it? Odd.

I chose a speaker dedicated to this frequency range - a 10" from a Gallien Kruger bass amp. It's shock-mounted inside a cheapo 12" Millenium tom, which is covered with mesh heads and coated with black pyramid foam on the inside. Speaker sits approx. 2" behind the bearing edge, so setting it up 1" close to the front head it has the perfect distance (width of a hand) to it. There's not much bleed from other instruments due to the shell, the foam and the close distance. This is a photo of the actual speaker from the ebay auction, which I dyed black using black ink:

index.php

I think since Yamaha was the first to make a subkick commercially available, and engineers were using the woofer out of the NS-10 to do so prior, everyone thought that was the only speaker to use for DIY. But, like you said, it's lacking in the bass frequencies so it seems like a logical choice to use a driver capable of even lower frequencies. You obviously made a wise selection. Not to mention an excellent job in constructing it.
I had considered making one in the past, when I was doing more studio work, but never got around to it. I may reconsider once I get set back up for recording.
Thanks for the info, and I look forward to hearing more from it/you in the future. (y)
 

Supergrobi

Technical Supervisor
I think since Yamaha was the first to make a subkick commercially available, and engineers were using the woofer out of the NS-10 to do so prior, everyone thought that was the only speaker to use for DIY.
Sounds absolutely reasonable to me.
 
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