First gig tips? Let's make a thread.

KamaK

Platinum Member
Random tips....

1: Your water goes in a spill proof container.
2: Spare sticks within reach.
3: Smile and (pretend to) have a great time.
4: Go potty before taking the stage.
5: Terrycloth towel.
6: Pimp your merch and schmooze after you strike the stage.
7: Hand sanitizer in case you have to shake two dozen people's hands.
8: Throw a roll of premium quality TP into your gig bag (you'll thank me later)

Advanced tips:

If the bar is having a special, on say Red Stripe, ask the bartender for an empry bottle and put it in a place next to you that is visible to the audience.
Stagger your booty-shakers and slow-numbers 3/1 or 4/1 to control bar-run-flow.
 

veecharlie

Senior Member
Random tips....

1: Your water goes in a spill proof container.
2: Spare sticks within reach.
3: Smile and (pretend to) have a great time.
4: Go potty before taking the stage.
5: Terrycloth towel.
6: Pimp your merch and schmooze after you strike the stage.
7: Hand sanitizer in case you have to shake two dozen people's hands.
8: Throw a roll of premium quality TP into your gig bag (you'll thank me later)

Advanced tips:

If the bar is having a special, on say Red Stripe, ask the bartender for an empry bottle and put it in a place next to you that is visible to the audience.
Stagger your booty-shakers and slow-numbers 3/1 or 4/1 to control bar-run-flow.
Number 4 it’s so true!!!! Lol I don’t want to be nasty.

Today I was not really feeling good and I realized I should prepare a Malay bag with “emergency” painkillers and stuff like that. It can really make gigs quite easier lol
 

ZildjianLover

Senior Member
1. Have several pairs of spare sticks within reach.
2. Have a backup snare drum in case something on your primary one malfunctions or you bust a head.
3. Have at least two drum keys on your person and/or in your stick bag.
4. Don't play on an empty stomach - eat before the show.
5. Take a bathroom break before the show.
 

cbphoto

Gold Member
There are great suggestions here!

My 2¢:
To avoid or minimize nervousness and/or anxiety, learn your music to the point of knowing every note to play in every song. Have the tempo of every tune memorized, or use a Tama Rhythm Watch in “stage mode”.
 

philrudd

Senior Member
1) Relax.

2) Double-check that you have all your gear before leaving for the gig. Then check it again.

3) Relax.

4) Remember the club/bar/stage will sound differently than your rehearsal room. Try to filter it out as best you can, and just concentrate on your parts, not so much the sound. (Practicing and then playing with good hearing protection is, I've found, an unintended benefit in facilitating this.)

5) Relax! You started drumming to have fun and meet chicks - always remember that! It ain't brain surgery.
 

MatzeM

Junior Member
After playing in primarily small venues which only required a bass drum microphone, I had my first "real stage" gigging experience with a fully microphoned kit two weeks ago and encountered some difficulties with the sound engineer.

We play a viariety of styles ranging from bluesrock to more jazzy/funky stuff during our concerts. Accordingly, I adjust my playing dynamics. So there are some passages where I play fairly quiet and others where I do play louder. Overall, the engineer thought I was one of the quietest drummers he ever mixed. I'd like to hear the opinion of more experienced drummers in regard to this. Do you guys adjust your playing dynamics with a fully microphoned kit? Do you play louder overall and "equalize" your playing volume?
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
You need more than 2 sticks.
Don't forget a drum key.
Eat a good meal before leaving the house.
Take a pre show dump before leaving the house.
Don't get hammered waiting to go on stage.
Sound check involves hitting a few notes and a groove , it's not a solo.
Between songs don't solo or "jam" with the bass player.
If you think your a rockstar, your not.
If you think you suck your probibly better than your giving yourself credit for.
No one remembers any mistakes you will make, or even notice for the most part.
Don't tune the house kit if it's your first gig.
DON"T SPEED UP, live shows you tend to speed up a ton, especially first time.
bring a towel, stage lights are hot.
Be humble after and say thank you to complements even if you think your set sucked.

most important, have fun.
 

beyondbetrayal

Platinum Member
This just needed to be quoted for it's profoundness.

I was quoted in a documentary last year on some local music stuff, I was asked if I had a pre show ritual. All I said was pre-show dump.

The guy working the camera lost it so hard we had to redo the take and they insisted I repeat that, so I am sure that will end up in the video. To any musician / drummer though, you guys know what I am talking about. Once that adrenilin kicks in or the nerves, you'll be happy you did. haha
 

KamaK

Platinum Member
I was quoted in a documentary last year on some local music stuff, I was asked if I had a pre show ritual. All I said was pre-show dump.

The guy working the camera lost it so hard we had to redo the take and they insisted I repeat that, so I am sure that will end up in the video. To any musician / drummer though, you guys know what I am talking about. Once that adrenilin kicks in or the nerves, you'll be happy you did. haha
All this time, the audience thought you simply were putting on your mean-face. Little did they know.
 

eclipseownzu

Gold Member
Soundcheck (if you get one) is not a time to practice your drum solo. The goal is to get a good level on every drum, not to practice your blast beat skills. Hit each drum, play a four on the floor beat, roll across the toms and call it good.

You monitor mix (if you have one) will not be great. Figure out what you need (for me its kick and rhythm guitar), have it put in your monitor and roll with what you got.

Between songs is not a time to practice your drum solo. Finish the song, get a drink, wipe off some sweat and get ready for the next one.

Have fun!
 

Black Label

Senior Member
1. Make sure your spare sticks are within reach
2. Don't try anything new - play what you rehearsed
3. Watch your tempo
4. Keep an eye on the band leader in case there's a change of plan
 

beotos

Junior Member
You need more than 2 sticks.
Don't forget a drum key.
Eat a good meal before leaving the house.
Take a pre show dump before leaving the house.
Don't get hammered waiting to go on stage.
Sound check involves hitting a few notes and a groove , it's not a solo.
Between songs don't solo or "jam" with the bass player.
If you think your a rockstar, your not.

If you think you suck your probibly better than your giving yourself credit for.
No one remembers any mistakes you will make, or even notice for the most part.
Don't tune the house kit if it's your first gig.
DON"T SPEED UP, live shows you tend to speed up a ton, especially first time.
bring a towel, stage lights are hot.
Be humble after and say thank you to complements even if you think your set sucked.

most important, have fun.
BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
 
make sure that playing the songs is second nature so that on the gig you have some overhead to be aware of the other things people have mentioned like keeping tempo and appropriate dynamics.

If that is all under control:

Have Fun!
Smile!
Let the audience see that you genuinely love playing music and that you love playing each song that you're playing.
 
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